Oracle Scratchpad

June 8, 2012

Unique Fail

Filed under: Bugs,CBO,Execution plans,Oracle,Statistics — Jonathan Lewis @ 5:54 pm BST Jun 8,2012

As in – how come a unique (or primary key) index is predicted to return more than one row using a unique scan. Here’s and example (running on 10.2.0.3 – but the same type of thing happens on newer versions):
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March 21, 2012

ACS

Filed under: Bugs,Infrastructure,Oracle,Upgrades — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:15 pm BST Mar 21,2012

You’ve probably heard about adaptive cursor sharing, and possibly you’ve wondered why you haven’t seen it happening very often on your production systems (assuming you’re running a modern version of Oracle). Here’s a little bug/fix that may explain the non-appearance.

MOS Doc ID 9532657.8 Adaptive cursor sharing ignores SELECTs which are not fully fetched.

This bug is confirmed in 11.2.0.1, and fixed in 11.2.0.3. The problem is that the ACS code doesn’t process the statistical information from the cursor unless the cursor reaches “end of fetch” – i.e. if you don’t select all the data in your query, Oracle doesn’t consider the statistics of that execution when deciding whether or not to re-optimise a statement.

It’s quite possible, of course, for an OLTP system, and particularly a web-based system, to execute a number of that allow the user to fetch data one “page” at a time, and stop before fetching all the data – so this bug (or limitation, perhaps) means that some critical statements in your application may never be re-optimized. If this is the case, and you know that you have some such statements that should generate multiple plans, then you could add the hint /*+ bind_aware */ to the SQL.

Upgrade woes: as ever, when a bug is fixed, it’s possible that a few people will suffer from unfortunate side-effects. In the case of this bug, Oracle may start to re-optimize and generated multiple child cursors for SQL statements that (from your perspective) didn’t need the extra work. If you’re very unlucky this may have an undesirable impact on execution performance, and library cache activity.

Thanks to Leonid Roodnitsky for sending me a note about this bug after attending one of my tutorial days last month.

March 12, 2012

First_rows hash

Filed under: Bugs,CBO,Execution plans,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 1:49 am BST Mar 12,2012

Just like my posting on an index hash, this posting is about a problem as well as being about a hash join. The article has its roots in a question posted on the OTN database forum, where a user has shown us the following execution plan:

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                     | Name                    | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT              |                         |    14 |   896 |    63   (7)| 00:00:01 |
|   1 |  SORT GROUP BY                |                         |    14 |   896 |    63   (7)| 00:00:01 |
|   2 |   NESTED LOOPS                |                         |       |       |            |          |
|   3 |    NESTED LOOPS               |                         |    14 |   896 |    62   (5)| 00:00:01 |
|*  4 |     HASH JOIN                 |                         |    14 |   280 |    48   (7)| 00:00:01 |
|   5 |      VIEW                     | V_SALES_ALL             |   200 |  1800 |     4   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   6 |       UNION-ALL               |                         |       |       |            |          |
|   7 |        INDEX FAST FULL SCAN   | PRODUCTS_DATES_IDX      |   100 |   900 |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   8 |        INDEX FAST FULL SCAN   | PRODUCTS_DATES_IDX_HARD |   100 |   900 |     2   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  9 |      VIEW                     | index$_join$_003        |  2238 | 24618 |    44   (7)| 00:00:01 |
|* 10 |       HASH JOIN               |                         |       |       |            |          |
|* 11 |        INDEX RANGE SCAN       | PRODUCTS_GF_INDEX2      |  2238 | 24618 |     6   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|  12 |        INDEX FAST FULL SCAN   | PRODUCTS_GF_PK          |  2238 | 24618 |    45   (3)| 00:00:01 |
|* 13 |     INDEX UNIQUE SCAN         | DATES_PK                |     1 |       |     0   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|  14 |    TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| DATES                   |     1 |    44 |     1   (0)| 00:00:01 |
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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March 2, 2012

Add Constraint

Filed under: Bugs,Infrastructure,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:33 pm BST Mar 2,2012

Here’s a quirky little detail that may make you think carefully about how you define and load large tables.
I have a large table which I load with data and then apply the following:

alter table t_15400 modify (id not null, small_vc not null);

Would you really expect to find Oracle doing two tablescans on the table to enable these constraints ? This is what I found in a trace file (with a lot of db file scattered read waits and other stuff in between) when I ran the test recently on 11.2.0.3:

select /*+ all_rows ordered */ A.rowid, :1, :2, :3 from "SYS"."T_15400" A where( "ID" is null)
select /*+ all_rows ordered */ A.rowid, :1, :2, :3 from "SYS"."T_15400" A where( "SMALL_VC" is null)

It’s just a little difficult to come up with a good reason for this approach, rather than a single statement that validates both constaints at once.

Somewhere I think I’ve published a note that points out that when you add a primary key constraint Oracle first checks that the key column (or column set) is not null – which means that adding a primary key may also result in a tablescan for every column in the index before the index is created – but in that case you can’t see the SQL that checks each column, you have to infer the check from the number of tablescans and number of rows fetched by tablescan. The trace file is rather more helpful if all you’re doing is adding the not null constraints.

February 29, 2012

Missing Filter

Filed under: Bugs,Execution plans,Oracle,subqueries — Jonathan Lewis @ 9:30 pm BST Feb 29,2012

I see that Christian Antognini posted a note about an interesting little defect in Enterprise Manager a little while ago – it doesn’t always know how to interpret execution plans. The problem appears in Christians’ example when a filter subquery predicate is applied during an index range scan – it’s a topic I wrote about a few months ago with the title “filter bug” because the plan shows (or, rather, fails to show) a “missing” filter operation, which has been subsumed into the predicate section of the thing that would otherwise have been the first child of the filter operation – the rule of recursive descent through the plan breaks, and the ordering that OEM gives for the operations goes wrong.

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February 24, 2012

Upgrades again

Filed under: Bugs,Oracle,Upgrades — Jonathan Lewis @ 2:39 pm BST Feb 24,2012

I’ve just spent a couple of days in Switzerland presenting seminar material to an IT company based in Delemont (about 50 minutes drive from Basle), and during the course I picked up a number of new stories about interesting things that have gone wrong at client sites. Here’s one that might be of particular interest to people thinking of upgrading from 10g to 11g – even if you don’t hit the bug described in the blog, the fact that the new feature has been implemented may leave you wondering where all your machine resources are going during the overnight run.

 

February 14, 2012

Subquery Factoring

Filed under: Bugs,CBO,Execution plans,Oracle,Subquery Factoring,Tuning — Jonathan Lewis @ 5:59 pm BST Feb 14,2012

Here’s an interesting little conundrum about subquery factoring that hasn’t changed in the recent (11.2.0.3) patch for subquery factoring. It came to me from Jared Still (a fellow member of Oak Table Network) shortly after I’d made some comments about the patch. It’s an example based on the scott/tiger schema – which I’ve extracted from the script $ORACLE_HOME/rdbms/admin/utlsampl.sql (though the relevant scripts may be demobld.sql or scott.sql, depending on version).
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January 31, 2012

Bug fixes

Filed under: Bugs,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:37 pm BST Jan 31,2012

From MOS (Metalink) a search for “Patch Set – List of Bug Fixes by Problem” is a useful search, andother is “Availability and Known Issues”. Whenever you find some behaviour that looks like a bug, it’s worth checking the patch sets for the patches or release that are newer than the version that you’re running – you may find that your problem is a known bug with a patch that might be back-ported.

For ease of reference, here are some of the results I got (sorted in reverse order of version) from the searches; you will need a MOS account to follow the links:

January 4, 2012

Index size bug

Filed under: Bugs,dbms_xplan,Indexing,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 5:29 pm BST Jan 4,2012

Here’s a follow-up to a post I did some time ago about estimating the size of an index before you create it. The note describes dbms_stats.create_index_cost() procedure, and how it depends on the results of a call to explain plan. A recent question on the OTN database forum highlighted a bug in explain plan, however, which I can demonstrate very easily. I’ll start with a small amount of data to demonstrate the basic content that is used to calculate the index cost.
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December 30, 2011

FBI Bug

Filed under: Bugs,Execution plans,Function based indexes,Indexing,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 5:47 pm BST Dec 30,2011

Here’s a funny little optimizer bug – though one that seems to have been fixed by at least 10.2.0.3. It showed up earlier on today in a thread on the OTN database forum. We’ll start (in 9.2.0.8) with a little table and two indexes – one normal, the other descending.
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December 19, 2011

Correlation oddity

Filed under: Bugs,Indexing,Oracle,trace files,Troubleshooting — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:26 pm BST Dec 19,2011

This one’s so odd I nearly posted it as a “Quiz Night” – but decided that it would be friendlier simply to demonstrate it. Here’s a simple script to create a couple of identical tables. It’s using my standard environment but, apart from fiddling with optimizer settings, I doubt if there’s any reason why you need to worry too much about getting the environment exactly right.
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September 12, 2011

System Stats

Filed under: Bugs,CBO,Oracle,Statistics,System Stats,Upgrades — Jonathan Lewis @ 5:40 pm BST Sep 12,2011

A quick collation – and warning – for 11.2

Bottom line – be careful about what you do with system stats on 11.2

Footnote: the MOS link is a search string  producing a list of references. I set it up like that because one of the articles referencing the bug is called “Things to consider before upgrade to 11.2.0.2″ and it’s worth reading.

Addendum: one of the people on the two-day course I’ve just run in Berlin sent me a link for a quick note on how to set your own values for the system stats if you hit this bug. It’s actually quite a reasonable thing to do whether or not you hit the bug given the way that gathering the stats can produce unsuitable figures anyway:  setting system stats. (I’ve also added their company blog to the links on the right, they have a number interesting items and post fairly regularly.)

August 3, 2011

Trouble-shooting

Filed under: Bugs,Oracle,Troubleshooting — Jonathan Lewis @ 5:37 pm BST Aug 3,2011

How do you trouble-shoot a problem ? It’s not an easy question to answer when posed in this generic fashion; but perhaps it’s possible to help people trouble-shoot by doing some examples in front of them. (This is why I’ve got so many statspack/AWR examples – just reading a collection of different problems helps you to get into the right mental habit.)

So here’s a problem someone sent me yesterday. Since it only took a few seconds to read, and included a complete build for a test case, with results, and since it clearly displayed an Oracle bug, I took a look at it. (I’ve trimmed the test a little bit, there were a few more queries leading up to the error):

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June 30, 2011

Virtual bug

Filed under: Bugs,Function based indexes,Indexing,Oracle,Parallel Execution,Statistics,Troubleshooting — Jonathan Lewis @ 5:37 pm BST Jun 30,2011

I’ve said in the past that one of the best new features, in my view, in 11g was the appearance of proper virtual columns; and I’ve also been very keen on the new “approximate NDV” that makes it viable to collect stats with the “auto_sample_size”.

Who’d have guessed that if you put them both together, then ran a parallel stats collection it would break :(

The bug number Karen quotes (10013177.8) doesn’t (appear to) mention extended stats – but since virtual columns, function-based indexes, and extended stats share a number of implementation details I’d guess that they might be affected as well.

June 7, 2011

Audit Excess

Filed under: audit,Bugs,Infrastructure,Oracle,trace files,Troubleshooting — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:18 pm BST Jun 7,2011

So you’ve decided you want to audit a particular table in your database, and think that Oracle’s built in audit command will do what you want. You discover two options that seem to be relevant:

audit all on t1 by access;
audit all on t1 by session;

To check the audit state of anything in your schema you can then run a simple query – with a few SQL*Plus formatting commands – to see something like the following:

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