Oracle Scratchpad

October 13, 2013

Parallel Execution – 1

Filed under: Execution plans,Oracle,Parallel Execution — Jonathan Lewis @ 7:43 pm BST Oct 13,2013

When you read an execution plan you’re probably trying to identify the steps that Oracle went through to acquire the final result set so that you can decide whether or not there is a more efficient way of getting the same result.

For a serial execution plan this typically means you have to identify the join order, join methods and access methods together with the point at which each predicate was applied. Generally this isn’t too difficult, although subquery pushing (and a couple of presentation bugs relating to other uses of scalar subqueries) can cause a little confusion; and the difference between join order and the order of operation can be slightly obscured when considering hash joins.

Parallel execution plans are harder, though, because you really need to understand the impact of the order of operation, distribution mechanisms chosen, and (in recent versions of Oracle) the timing of the generation and use of Bloom filters. The topic is stunningly large and easy to describe badly; it’s also going to be easy to make generalisations that turn out to be untrue or (at least) sufficiently incomplete as to be misleading. Rather than attempting to cover the topic in one note, I think I’m going to end up writing two or three.

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September 27, 2013

Virtual Stats

Filed under: CBO,Execution plans,Oracle,Statistics — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:49 am BST Sep 27,2013

Or – to be more accurate – real statistics on a virtual column.

This is one of the “10 top tips” that I came up with for my session with Maria Colgan at OOW13. A method of giving more information that might improve execution plans when you can’t change the code. I’ll start with a small data set including a virtual column (running 11.1.0.7), and a couple of problem queries:
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September 25, 2013

Autotrace trick

Filed under: Execution plans,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 11:58 pm BST Sep 25,2013

(… as in “trick or treat”)

Here’s an important point I learned from Maria Colgan’s “10 tips” presentation on Tuesday of Open World. It comes in two steps – the bit that most people know, and an unexpected consequence:

  1. autotrace can give misleading execution plans for queries that use bind variables – because autotrace doesn’t peek
  2. if you run a query after testing it with autotrace, the plan generated by autotrace can be shared by the later execution

Here’s a simple script I’ll be using to demonstrate the behaviour:

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September 13, 2013

Quiz Night

Filed under: Exadata,Execution plans,Oracle,Parallel Execution — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:32 pm BST Sep 13,2013

Here’s a little quiz about Bloom filtering. There seem to be at least three different classes of query where Bloom filters can come into play – all involving hash joins: partition elimination, aggregate reduction on non-mergeable aggregate views, and parallelism.

This quiz is about parallel queries – and all you have to do is work out how many Bloom filters were used in the following two execution plans (produced by 11.2.0.2), and where they were used.

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September 7, 2013

Hash Joins

Filed under: CBO,Execution plans,Hints,Oracle,Tuning — Jonathan Lewis @ 12:53 pm BST Sep 7,2013

I’ve written notes about the different join mechanisms in the past – but such things are always worth revisiting, so here’s an accumulated bundle of comments about hash joins.

A hash join takes two inputs that (in most of the Oracle literature) are referred to as the “build table” and the “probe table”. These rowsources may be extracts from real tables or indexes, or might be result sets from previous joins. Oracle uses the “build table” to build a hash table in memory, consuming and using the rowsource in a single call; it then consumes the “probe table” one row at a time, probing the in-memory hash table to find a match.

Access to the hash table is made efficient by use of a hashing function applied to the join columns – rows with the same value on the join column end up hashing to the same place in the hash table. It is possible for different input values to produce the same hash value (a hash collision) so Oracle still has to check the actual values once it has identified “probable” joins in the hash table. Because the comparison is based on a hashing mechanism, hash joins can only be used for join predicates that are equality predicates.
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August 13, 2013

NVL()

Filed under: CBO,Conditional SQL,Execution plans,NULL,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 7:14 am BST Aug 13,2013

Here’s a little detail about how the optimizer can handle the nvl() function that I hadn’t noticed before (and it goes back to at least 8i). This is running on 11.2.0.3, and table t1 is just all_objects where rownum <= 20000:

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August 5, 2013

Bloom Filter

Filed under: 12c,CBO,Execution plans,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 9:22 pm BST Aug 5,2013

I’ve posted this note as a quick way of passing on an example prompted by a twitter conversation with Timur and Maria about Bloom filters:

The Bloom filter (capital B because it’s named after a person) is not supposed to appear in Oracle plans unless the query is executing in parallel but here’s an example which seems to use a serial Bloom filter.  Running in 11.2.0.3 and 12.1.0.1 (the results shown are the latter – the numbers are slightly different between versions):

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July 25, 2013

Parallel to Serial

Filed under: Execution plans,Oracle,Parallel Execution — Jonathan Lewis @ 5:21 pm BST Jul 25,2013

Here’s a little problem that came up on the Oracle-L listserver today:

I’m trying to write a query which reads the corresponding partition of the fact, extracts the list of join keys, materialises this result set, and finally joins the necessary dimensions. The key thing I’m trying to do is to run the initial query on the fact in parallel and then the rest of the query serially.

The full requirement, if you follow the link, may seem a little puzzling but there’s no point in second-guessing every question that people ask – there’s usually a reason for doing something in a particular way – so I just rattled off the first thing that came to mind, which was this:  when you include rownum in a parallel query Oracle has to serialise to generate the rownum – so create an inline view which does the parallel but adds a rownum to the select list, then join to the inline view. The plan should include a VIEW operator holding the parallel bit, and then you can hint as necessary to make the subsequent activity serial.

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June 28, 2013

Illogical Tuning

Filed under: CBO,Execution plans,Oracle,subqueries — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:55 pm BST Jun 28,2013

The title is a bit of a joke, really. It’s mirroring a title I used a little over a year ago “Logical Tuning” and reflects my surprise that a silly little trick that I tried actually worked.

If you don’t want to read the original article, here’s a quick précis – I started with the first query, which the optimizer executed as a filter subquery, and rewrote it as the second query, which the optimizer executed as two anti-joins (reducing the execution time from 95 seconds to 27 seconds):

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June 7, 2013

Same Plan

Filed under: CBO,Execution plans,Oracle,Tuning — Jonathan Lewis @ 5:11 pm BST Jun 7,2013

An interesting little problem appeared on the Oracle-L mailing list earlier on this week – a query ran fairly quickly when statistics hadn’t been collected on the tables, but then ran rather slowly after stats collection even though the plan hadn’t changed, and the tkprof results were there to prove the point. Here are the two outputs (edited slightly for width – the original showed three sets of row stats, the 1st, avg and max, but since the query had only been run once the three columns showed the same results in each case):

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June 6, 2013

Parallel DML

Filed under: Execution plans,Oracle,Parallel Execution — Jonathan Lewis @ 8:06 am BST Jun 6,2013

Parallel DML is not enabled by default, and it’s easy to forget this and think you’ve made an operation “as parallel as possible” by declaring objects parallel or putting in hints for parallelism.

A recent question on OTN asked about speeding up a  materialized view refresh that seemed to be spending a lot of its time waiting on “PX Deq Credit: send blkd”. The manuals describe this as an “idle event”; but that’s not always true. The OP had supplied the output from tkprof for one of the sessions showing the “insert as select” that was the (complete) refresh and it was clear that the select was running in parallel, but the insert wasn’t – and that’s one case in which the “PX Deq Credit: send blkd” is arguably an “idle” wait (with a timeout of 2 seconds). It’s possible that the refresh could go faster if the OP enabled parallel DML.

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May 13, 2013

Parse Time

Filed under: Execution plans,Oracle,Performance,Troubleshooting — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:59 pm BST May 13,2013

Dominic Brooks published a note recently about some very nasty SQL – originally thinking that it was displaying a run-time problem due to the extreme number of copies of the lnnvl() function the optimizer had produced. In fact it turned out to be a parse-time problem rather than a run-time problem, but when I first read Dominic’s note I was sufficiently surprised that I decided to try modelling the query.

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February 13, 2013

STS, OFE and SPM

Filed under: dbms_xplan,Execution plans,Hints,Oracle,Upgrades — Jonathan Lewis @ 9:19 am BST Feb 13,2013

That’s SQL Tuning Sets, optimizer_features_enable, and SQL Plan Management.

There’s a recent post on OTN describing an issue when using SQL Tuning Sets to enforce plan stability when upgrading from 10.2.0.3 to 11.2.0.3 – it doesn’t always work. Here’s a very simple model to demonstrate the type of thing that can happen (the tables are cloned from a completely different demo, so don’t ask why I picked the data they hold):

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January 28, 2013

Losing it

Filed under: Execution plans,Oracle,Troubleshooting — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:08 pm BST Jan 28,2013

The example I gave last week showing how a SORT operation in an execution plan might include the work of resolving function calls in your SQL and might, therefore, be reporting much higher resource utilisation than expected reminded me of some problems I’ve had with gaps in execution plans in the past. So I thought I’d give a little demonstration of the way in which the completeness of execution plans can develop over time.

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January 25, 2013

Sorting

Filed under: Execution plans,Oracle,Troubleshooting — Jonathan Lewis @ 5:45 pm BST Jan 25,2013

Here’s a little quirk of execution plans that came up recently on the Oak Table network. If you call a function in a query, and do some sorting with the results, where does the work of calling the function get reported in the execution plan if you trace the query or look at the in-memory rowsource execution stats. Let’s take a look at a simple example:

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