Oracle Scratchpad

May 13, 2013

Parse Time

Filed under: Execution plans,Oracle,Performance,Troubleshooting — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:59 pm GMT May 13,2013

Dominic Brooks published a note recently about some very nasty SQL – originally thinking that it was displaying a run-time problem due to the extreme number of copies of the lnnvl() function the optimizer had produced. In fact it turned out to be a parse-time problem rather than a run-time problem, but when I first read Dominic’s note I was sufficiently surprised that I decided to try modelling the query.

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May 10, 2013

Hakan Factor

Filed under: Infrastructure,Oracle,Troubleshooting — Jonathan Lewis @ 3:52 pm GMT May 10,2013

Here’s a quick and dirty script to create a procedure (in the SYS schema – so be careful) to check the Hakan Factor for an object. If you’re not familiar with the Hakan Factor, it’s the value that gets set when you use the command “alter table minimize records_per_block;”.

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May 2, 2013

v$lock

Filed under: Locks,Oracle,Statistics,Troubleshooting — Jonathan Lewis @ 7:03 pm GMT May 2,2013

The problem of slow queries on v$lock just came up again on the OTN database forum, so I thought I’d better push out a post that’s been hanging around on my blog for the last few months. This is actually mentioned in MOS in note 1328789.1: “Query Against v$lock Run from OEM Performs Slowly” which points out that it is basically a problem of bad statistics and all you have to do is collect the stats.

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April 16, 2013

systimestamp

Filed under: Bugs,Oracle,Troubleshooting — Jonathan Lewis @ 12:46 am GMT Apr 16,2013

For your entertainment – there’s nothing up my sleeves, this was a simple cut-n-paste after real-time typing with no tricks:

20:39:51 SQL> create table t1 (t1 timestamp);

Table created.

20:39:55 SQL> insert into t1 values(systimestamp);

1 row created.

20:39:59 SQL> select t1 - systimestamp  from t1;

T1-SYSTIMESTAMP
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
+000000000 04:59:50.680620

1 row selected.

20:40:08 SQL>

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April 13, 2013

Deadlocks

Filed under: deadlocks,Locks,Oracle,Troubleshooting — Jonathan Lewis @ 11:36 am GMT Apr 13,2013

Here’s a deadlock graph that might cause a little confusion:

Deadlock graph:
                       ---------Blocker(s)--------  ---------Waiter(s)---------
 Resource Name          process session holds waits  process session holds waits
 TX-001a0015-00014787        34      90     X             32       3           S
 TX-00190008-0000601b        32       3     X             34      90           S

 session 90: DID 0001-0022-00000327      session 3: DID 0001-0020-000009E9
 session 3: DID 0001-0020-000009E9       session 90: DID 0001-0022-00000327

 Rows waited on:
  Session 90: obj - rowid = 00030CE5 - AAAwzlAAGAABDiuAAA
  (dictionary objn - 199909, file - 6, block - 276654, slot - 0)
  Session 3: obj - rowid = 00030CE5 - AAAwzlAAGAABp8gAAA
  (dictionary objn - 199909, file - 6, block - 433952, slot - 0)

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April 7, 2013

DML Tracking

Filed under: Oracle,Troubleshooting — Jonathan Lewis @ 10:04 pm GMT Apr 7,2013

You’ve probably seen questions on the internet occasionally about finding out how frequently an object has been modified. The question is a little ambiguous – does it mean how much change has occurred, or how many DML statements have been executed; either may be an interesting measure. Of course, Oracle gave us a method of answering the first question a long time ago: v$segstat (or v$segment_statistics if you don’t mind suffering the join) and the resulting content in the AWR or Statspack reports:
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March 31, 2013

Index Selectivity

Filed under: CBO,Oracle,Troubleshooting — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:42 pm GMT Mar 31,2013

Here’s a summary of a recent posting on OTN:

I have two indexes (REFNO, REFTYPESEQNO) and (REFNO,TMSTAMP,REFTYPESEQNO). When I run the following query the optimizer uses the second index rather than the first index – which is an exact match for the predicates, unless I hint it otherwise:

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March 29, 2013

Missing SQL

Filed under: Bugs,Oracle,Statspack,Troubleshooting — Jonathan Lewis @ 9:35 am GMT Mar 29,2013

From time to time I’ve looked at an AWR report and pointed out to the owner the difference in work load visible in the “SQL ordered by” sections of the report when they compare the summary figure with the sum of the work done by the individual statements. Often the summary will state that the captured SQL in the interval represents some percentage of the total workload  in the high 80s to mid 90s – sometimes you might see a statement that the capture represents a really low percentage, perhaps in the 30s or 40s.

You have to be a little sensible about interpreting these figures, of course – at one extreme it’s easy to double-count the cost of SQL inside PL/SQL, at the other you may notice that every single statement reported does about the same amount of work so you can’t extrapolate from a pattern to decide how significant a low percentage might be. Nevertheless I have seen examples of AWR reports where I’ve felt justified in suggesting that at some point in the interval some SQL has appeared, worked very hard, and disappeared from the library cache before the AWR managed to capture it.

Now, from Nigel Noble, comes another explanation for why the AWR report might be hiding expensive SQL – a bug, which doesn’t get fixed until 12.2 (although there are backports in hand).

March 27, 2013

Open Cursors

Filed under: Infrastructure,Oracle,Troubleshooting — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:13 pm GMT Mar 27,2013

Here’s a little detail that appeared in 11gR2 that may help you answer questions about open cursors. Oracle has added a “cursor type” column to the view v$open_cursor, so you can now see which cursors have been held open because of the pl/sql cursor cache, which have been held by the session cursor cache, and various other reasons why Oracle may take a short-cut when you fire a piece of SQL at it.

The following is the output showing the state of a particular session just after it has started up in SQL*Plus and called a PL/SQL procedure to run a simple count:
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March 4, 2013

Duplicate indexes ?

Filed under: Indexing,Oracle,Troubleshooting — Jonathan Lewis @ 5:39 pm GMT Mar 4,2013

I don’t think this is likely to happen on a production system (until 12c) – but look what you can do if you try hard enough:

  1  select
  2     index_name, column_name from user_ind_columns
  3  where
  4     table_name = 'T1'
  5  order by
  6*    index_name , column_position
SQL> /

INDEX_NAME           COLUMN_NAME
-------------------- --------------------
T1_I1                N1
                     V1

T1_I2                N1
                     V1


4 rows selected.

That’s a straight cut-n-paste from an Oracle 11.1.0.7 SQL*Plus session. (You can tell I typed it in real time because I missed the return before the FROM, and couldn’t be bothered to go back and do it again ;) )

February 22, 2013

Deadlock Detection

Filed under: deadlocks,Locks,Oracle,Troubleshooting — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:19 pm GMT Feb 22,2013

By some strange coincidence, the “London Bus” effect perhaps, there have been three posts on the OTN database forum in the last couple of days relating to deadlocks; and they have prompted me to indulge in a little rant about the myth of Oracle and deadlock detection; it’s the one that goes:

“Oracle detects and resolves deadlocks automatically.”

Oracle may detect deadlocks automatically, but it doesn’t resolve them, it simply reports them (by raising error ORA-00060 and rolling back one statement) then leaves the deadlocked sessions stuck until the session that received the report resolves the problem or an external agent resolves the problem.

Consider the following example (which, I have to admit, I wrote without access to a live instance):

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February 18, 2013

Transactions 2

Filed under: Oracle,Statspack,Troubleshooting — Jonathan Lewis @ 7:54 am GMT Feb 18,2013

Here’s a little follow-on from Friday’s posting. I’ll start it off as a quiz, and follow up tomorrow with an explanation of the results (though someone will probably have given the correct solution by then anyway).

I have a simple heap table t1(id number(6,0), n1 number, v1 varchar2(10), padding varchar2(100)). The primary key is the id column, and the table holds 3,000 rows where id takes the values from 1 to 3,000. There are no other indexes. (I’d show you the code, but I don’t want to make it too easy to run the code, I want you to try to work it out in your heads).

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February 15, 2013

Transactions

Filed under: Oracle,Statspack,Troubleshooting — Jonathan Lewis @ 8:07 am GMT Feb 15,2013

It’s very easy to get a lot of information from an AWR (or Statspack) report – provided you remember what all the numbers represent. From time to time I find that someone asks me a question about some statistic and my mind goes completely blank about the exact interpretation; but fortunately it’s always possible to cross check because so many of the statistics are cross-linked. Here’s an example of a brief mental block I ran into a few days ago – I thought I knew the answer, but realised that I wasn’t 100% sure that my memory was correct:

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January 28, 2013

Losing it

Filed under: Execution plans,Oracle,Troubleshooting — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:08 pm GMT Jan 28,2013

The example I gave last week showing how a SORT operation in an execution plan might include the work of resolving function calls in your SQL and might, therefore, be reporting much higher resource utilisation than expected reminded me of some problems I’ve had with gaps in execution plans in the past. So I thought I’d give a little demonstration of the way in which the completeness of execution plans can develop over time.

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January 25, 2013

Sorting

Filed under: Execution plans,Oracle,Troubleshooting — Jonathan Lewis @ 5:45 pm GMT Jan 25,2013

Here’s a little quirk of execution plans that came up recently on the Oak Table network. If you call a function in a query, and do some sorting with the results, where does the work of calling the function get reported in the execution plan if you trace the query or look at the in-memory rowsource execution stats. Let’s take a look at a simple example:

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