Oracle Scratchpad

July 27, 2014

Analogy

Filed under: 12c,Oracle,Uncategorized — Jonathan Lewis @ 8:02 am BST Jul 27,2014

So 12.1.0.2 is out with a number of interesting new features, of which the most noisily touted is the “in-memory columnar storage” feature. As ever the key to making best use of a feature is to have an intuitive grasp of what it gives you, and it’s often the case that a good analogy helps you reach that level of understanding; so here’s the first thought I had about the feature during one of the briefing days run by Maria Colgan.

“In-memory columnar storage gives you bitmap indexes on OLTP systems without the usual disastrous locking side effects.”

Obviously the analogy isn’t perfect … but I think it’s very close:  for each column stored you use a compression technique to pack the values for a large number of rows into a very small space, and for each stored row you can derive the rowid by arithmetic.  In highly concurrent OLTP systems there’s still room for some contention as the session journals are applied to the globally stored compressed columns (but then, private redo introduces some effects of that sort anyway); and the “indexes” have to be created dynamically as tables are initially accessed (but that’s a startup cost, it’s timing can be controlled, and it’s basically limited to a tablescan).

Whatever the technical hand-waving it introduces – thinking of the in-memory thing as enabling real-time bitmaps ought to help you think of ways to make good use of the feature.

 

 

July 2, 2014

Comparisons

Filed under: Uncategorized — Jonathan Lewis @ 5:09 pm BST Jul 2,2014

Catching up (still) from the Trivadis CBO days, here’s a little detail which had never crossed my mind before.


where   (col1, col2) < (const1, const2)

This isn’t a legal construct in Oracle SQL, even though it’s legal in other dialects of SQL. The logic is simple (allowing for the usual anomaly with NULL): the predicate should evaluate to true if (col1 < const1), or if (col1 = const1 and col2 < const2). The thought that popped into my mind when Markus Winand showed a slide with this predicate on it – and then pointed out that equality was the only option that Oracle allowed for multi-column operators – was that, despite not enabling the syntax, Oracle does implement the mechanism.

If you’re struggling to think where, it’s in multi-column range partitioning: (value1, value2) belongs in the partition with high value (k1, k2) if (value1 < k1) or if (value1 = k1 and value2 < k2).

June 25, 2014

AWR thoughts

Filed under: Uncategorized — Jonathan Lewis @ 3:35 pm BST Jun 25,2014

It’s been a week since my last posting - so I thought I’d better contribute something to the community before my name gets lost in the mists of time.

I don’t have an article ready for publication, but some extracts from an AWR report appeared on the OTN database forum a few days ago, and I’ve made a few comments on what we’ve been given so far (with a warning that I might not have time to follow up on any further feedback). I tried to write my comments in a way that modelled the way I scanned (or would have scanned) through the reporting – noting things that caught my attention, listing some of the guesses and assumptions I made as I went along.  I hope it gives some indication of a pattern of thinking when dealing with a previously unseen AWR report.

 

 

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