Oracle Scratchpad

May 18, 2015

Migrated rows

Filed under: Infrastructure,Oracle,trace files,Troubleshooting — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:43 pm BST May 18,2015

I received an email recently describing a problem with a query which was running a full tablescan but: “almost all the waits are on ‘db file sequential read’ and the disk read is 10 times the table blocks”.  Some further information supplied was that the tablespace was using ASSM and 16KB block size; the table had 272 columns (ouch!) and the Oracle version was 11.2.0.4.

In his researches he had read my article on wide rows, and had picked out of one of the comments the line: “the very bad thing about chained rows and direct reads that is that finding the rest of row by ‘db file sequential read’ is never cached”, but he wasn’t sure that this was the problem he was seeing so, very sensibly, he had re-run the query with extended tracing available, and dumped (and formatted/edited) a couple of blocks from the table.

He then sent me the trace file and block dump. Generally this is a mistake – especially when the trace file is several megabytes – but he had prepared the ground well and had linked it back to one of my blog notes, and I thought there might be an opportunity for publishing a few more comments, so I took a look. Here’s a carefully edited subset of the block dump – showing all the pertinent information:


Start dump data blocks tsn: 99 file#:100 minblk 2513181 maxblk 2513181

Block header dump:  0x1926591d
 Object id on Block? Y
 seg/obj: 0x1652a7  csc: 0x53.891880b8  itc: 12  flg: E  typ: 1 - DATA
     brn: 1  bdba: 0x1965b70c ver: 0x01 opc: 0
     inc: 84  exflg: 0

 Itl           Xid                  Uba         Flag  Lck        Scn/Fsc
0x01   0x0010.01d.0000dff9  0x2b442286.3469.09  C---    0  scn 0x0053.891880b1
0x02   0x0000.000.00000000  0x00000000.0000.00  ----    0  fsc 0x0000.00000000
0x03   0x0000.000.00000000  0x00000000.0000.00  C---    0  scn 0x0000.00000000
0x04   0x0000.000.00000000  0x00000000.0000.00  C---    0  scn 0x0000.00000000
0x05   0x0000.000.00000000  0x00000000.0000.00  C---    0  scn 0x0000.00000000
0x06   0x0000.000.00000000  0x00000000.0000.00  C---    0  scn 0x0000.00000000
0x07   0x0000.000.00000000  0x00000000.0000.00  C---    0  scn 0x0000.00000000
0x08   0x0000.000.00000000  0x00000000.0000.00  C---    0  scn 0x0000.00000000
0x09   0x0000.000.00000000  0x00000000.0000.00  C---    0  scn 0x0000.00000000
0x0a   0x0000.000.00000000  0x00000000.0000.00  C---    0  scn 0x0000.00000000
0x0b   0x0000.000.00000000  0x00000000.0000.00  C---    0  scn 0x0000.00000000
0x0c   0x0000.000.00000000  0x00000000.0000.00  C---    0  scn 0x0000.00000000
bdba: 0x1926591d

data_block_dump,data header at 0x11083f154
===============
tsiz: 0x1ea8
hsiz: 0x26
pbl: 0x11083f154
     76543210
flag=--------
ntab=1
nrow=10
frre=-1
fsbo=0x26
fseo=0x4c5
avsp=0x49f
tosp=0x49f
0xe:pti[0]	nrow=10	offs=0
0x12:pri[0]	offs=0x1c15
0x14:pri[1]	offs=0x197b
0x16:pri[2]	offs=0x16e1
0x18:pri[3]	offs=0x1448
0x1a:pri[4]	offs=0x11b8
0x1c:pri[5]	offs=0xf1f
0x1e:pri[6]	offs=0xc85
0x20:pri[7]	offs=0x9ec
0x22:pri[8]	offs=0x752
0x24:pri[9]	offs=0x4c5
block_row_dump:
tab 0, row 0, @0x1c15
tl: 659 fb: -----L-- lb: 0x0  cc: 255
tab 0, row 1, @0x197b
tl: 666 fb: -----L-- lb: 0x0  cc: 255
tab 0, row 2, @0x16e1
tl: 666 fb: -----L-- lb: 0x0  cc: 255
tab 0, row 3, @0x1448
tl: 665 fb: -----L-- lb: 0x0  cc: 255
tab 0, row 4, @0x11b8
tl: 656 fb: -----L-- lb: 0x0  cc: 255
tab 0, row 5, @0xf1f
tl: 665 fb: -----L-- lb: 0x0  cc: 255
tab 0, row 7, @0x9ec
tl: 665 fb: -----L-- lb: 0x0  cc: 255
tab 0, row 8, @0x752
tl: 666 fb: -----L-- lb: 0x0  cc: 255
tab 0, row 9, @0x4c5
tl: 653 fb: -----L-- lb: 0x0  cc: 255

In the ITL you can see 10 entries with the flag set to “C—-” (committed) with no XID or SCN – that’s consistent with 10 rows migrating into the block in a single transaction. In the row directory you can see the block holds 10 rows, and in the body of the block you can see the header for each of those 10 rows with 255 columns (presumably the 2nd section of each row of 272 columns), and the flag bytes set to “—–L–” (the Last piece of a chained – as opposed to simply migrated – row).

So the block dump is consistent with the possiblity of a direct path read of a block somewhere (10 head pieces) having to read this block 10 times shortly afterwards. Can we find further corroboration in the trace file? The blockdump was for block 0x1926591d = 421943581 decimal


PARSE #4573135368:c=29,e=48,p=0,cr=0,cu=0,mis=0,r=0,dep=0,og=1,plh=4116693033,tim=79008343283418
EXEC #4573135368:c=53,e=93,p=0,cr=0,cu=0,mis=0,r=0,dep=0,og=1,plh=4116693033,tim=79008343283607
WAIT #4573135368: nam='SQL*Net message to client' ela= 1 driver id=1413697536 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=15477650 tim=79008343283636
WAIT #4573135368: nam='Disk file operations I/O' ela= 38 FileOperation=2 fileno=101 filetype=2 obj#=1462951 tim=79008343283973
WAIT #4573135368: nam='direct path read' ela= 8991 file number=100 first dba=947580 block cnt=13 obj#=1462951 tim=79008343293041

WAIT #4573135368: nam='db file sequential read' ela= 4934 file#=100 block#=2513181 blocks=1 obj#=1462951 tim=79008343298032
WAIT #4573135368: nam='db file sequential read' ela= 155 file#=100 block#=2513181 blocks=1 obj#=1462951 tim=79008343298216
WAIT #4573135368: nam='db file sequential read' ela= 127 file#=100 block#=2513181 blocks=1 obj#=1462951 tim=79008343298378
WAIT #4573135368: nam='db file sequential read' ela= 125 file#=100 block#=2513181 blocks=1 obj#=1462951 tim=79008343298526
WAIT #4573135368: nam='db file sequential read' ela= 128 file#=100 block#=2513181 blocks=1 obj#=1462951 tim=79008343298677
WAIT #4573135368: nam='db file sequential read' ela= 123 file#=100 block#=2513181 blocks=1 obj#=1462951 tim=79008343298826
WAIT #4573135368: nam='db file sequential read' ela= 134 file#=100 block#=2513181 blocks=1 obj#=1462951 tim=79008343298983
WAIT #4573135368: nam='db file sequential read' ela= 129 file#=100 block#=2513181 blocks=1 obj#=1462951 tim=79008343299135
WAIT #4573135368: nam='db file sequential read' ela= 180 file#=100 block#=2513181 blocks=1 obj#=1462951 tim=79008343299341
WAIT #4573135368: nam='db file sequential read' ela= 133 file#=100 block#=2513181 blocks=1 obj#=1462951 tim=79008343299497

WAIT #4573135368: nam='db file sequential read' ela= 11039 file#=100 block#=2513245 blocks=1 obj#=1462951 tim=79008343310565
WAIT #4573135368: nam='db file sequential read' ela= 133 file#=100 block#=2513245 blocks=1 obj#=1462951 tim=79008343310730
WAIT #4573135368: nam='db file sequential read' ela= 139 file#=100 block#=2513245 blocks=1 obj#=1462951 tim=79008343310895
WAIT #4573135368: nam='db file sequential read' ela= 124 file#=100 block#=2513245 blocks=1 obj#=1462951 tim=79008343311045
WAIT #4573135368: nam='db file sequential read' ela= 122 file#=100 block#=2513245 blocks=1 obj#=1462951 tim=79008343311190
WAIT #4573135368: nam='db file sequential read' ela= 127 file#=100 block#=2513245 blocks=1 obj#=1462951 tim=79008343311339
WAIT #4573135368: nam='db file sequential read' ela= 125 file#=100 block#=2513245 blocks=1 obj#=1462951 tim=79008343311490
WAIT #4573135368: nam='db file sequential read' ela= 134 file#=100 block#=2513245 blocks=1 obj#=1462951 tim=79008343311647
WAIT #4573135368: nam='db file sequential read' ela= 128 file#=100 block#=2513245 blocks=1 obj#=1462951 tim=79008343311797
WAIT #4573135368: nam='db file sequential read' ela= 124 file#=100 block#=2513245 blocks=1 obj#=1462951 tim=79008343311947

WAIT #4573135368: nam='db file sequential read' ela= 10592 file#=100 block#=2513309 blocks=1 obj#=1462951 tim=79008343322564
WAIT #4573135368: nam='db file sequential read' ela= 142 file#=100 block#=2513309 blocks=1 obj#=1462951 tim=79008343322740
WAIT #4573135368: nam='db file sequential read' ela= 126 file#=100 block#=2513309 blocks=1 obj#=1462951 tim=79008343322889

There are a couple of interesting details in this trace file.

First we note (as the OP said) there are very few direct path reads – but direct path reads can be asynchronous with several running concurrently, which means that we may report one direct path read while the data returned from others records no time. (You’ll have to take my word for the sparseness of direct path reads – there were 5 reading a total of 58 blocks from the object, compared to 50,000 db file sequential reads)

Then you can see that although each block that was subject to “db file sequential read” is reported 10 times, the first read is much slower than the subsequent ones – a fairly good indication that the later reads are coming from a cache somewhere. (The 50,00 reads consisted of roughly 5,300 blocks being read 10 times, 1,400 blocks being read 9 times, 460 blocks being read 8 times, and a few blocks being read 7 or fewer times.)

You might also notice that the “coincidental” jump of 64 blocks between the sets of 10 reads – this appears fairly frequently, and it’s the type of pattern you might expect to see when a serial process is allocating blocks for use in a clean ASSM tablespace after the extent sizes have become fairly large (possibly the 64MB size that eventually appears with system managed extent sizes). There’s a “pseudo-random” choice of block within extent dicated by the process id, that spreads the work done by a single process steadily through the extent. Having filled 2513181, 2513245, 2513309 and so on for 16 steps the trace file comes back to 2513182, 2513246, 2513309 and so on.

It’s interesting (and time-consuming) to check the patterns but what we really need next, and don’t have, to check the theory is the set of 13 blocks dictated by the first direct path read:

WAIT #4573135368: nam='direct path read' ela= 8991 file number=100 first dba=947580 block cnt=13 obj#=1462951 tim=79008343293041

It’s likely that somewhere in the 13 blocks in the range 947580 onwards we would find the 10 row head pieces pointing to block 2513181; then the 10 row head pieces pointing to block 2513245, and so on – and I’d hope that we might see a pattern of many consecutive (or near-consecutive) rows in each originating block pointing to the same “next block”. In fact, with a few blocks in the early range, we might even get some idea of how the application was loading and updating data and be able to make some suggestions for changing the strategy to avoid row chaining.

Footnote

The OP also had a follow-up question which was: “One question for the block dump is why there is no hrid in it since the row pieces are the second row pieces and the flag bit is ‘—–L–‘?”  It would be nice to see this, of course – then we wouldn’t need to see the 947580-947592 range to see what had been happening to the data – but that’s not the way Oracle works, as I’ve pointed out above; but since the answer was in another posting of mine I simply emailed the relevant URL to the OP.

3 Comments »

  1. Hi Jonathan,

    > but direct path reads can be asynchronous with several running concurrently, which means that we may report one direct path read while the data returned from others records no time. (You’ll have to take my word for the sparseness of direct path reads – there were 5 reading a total of 58 blocks from the object, compared to 50,000 db file sequential reads)

    Of course we trust you :-))

    … but afaik the wait event “direct path read” covers all parallel async I/O calls (io_submit and io_getevents) as Frits Hoogland showed here (https://fritshoogland.files.wordpress.com/2012/06/about-multiblock-reads-v2.pdf – starting on slide 61 + slides for slots). So i may misinterpret the phrase “while the data returned from others records no time”, but the time for all parallel async requests is recorded and summed by the one wait event “direct path read”.

    Thanks.

    Regards
    Stefan

    Comment by Stefan Koehler — May 18, 2015 @ 8:47 pm BST May 18,2015 | Reply

    • Stefan,

      There’s a complete tangle of counts and times with direct path reads that can make any interpretation obscure (beyond the basic fact that the time you see in the trace file probably has nothing to do with the total time that the discs were busy).

      Two details to support this – here’s the first few lines of the 10046 trace at level 8 of a tablescan of a table that is the only object created in a new tablespace (locally managed, uniform 1MB extent, 11.2.0.4).

      WAIT #140574166988000: nam='db file sequential read' ela= 481 file#=5 block#=128 blocks=1 obj#=194821 tim=1432151321866879
      WAIT #140574166988000: nam='direct path read' ela= 2646 file number=5 first dba=129 block cnt=127 obj#=194821 tim=1432151321873175
      WAIT #140574166988000: nam='direct path read' ela= 2866 file number=5 first dba=512 block cnt=128 obj#=194821 tim=1432151321880361
      WAIT #140574166988000: nam='direct path read' ela= 2468 file number=5 first dba=768 block cnt=128 obj#=194821 tim=1432151321885806
      WAIT #140574166988000: nam='direct path read' ela= 4210 file number=5 first dba=1024 block cnt=128 obj#=194821 tim=1432151321890908
      WAIT #140574166988000: nam='direct path read' ela= 3680 file number=5 first dba=1280 block cnt=128 obj#=194821 tim=1432151321896751
      WAIT #140574166988000: nam='direct path read' ela= 676 file number=5 first dba=1408 block cnt=128 obj#=194821 tim=1432151321897893
      WAIT #140574166988000: nam='direct path read' ela= 1662 file number=5 first dba=1536 block cnt=128 obj#=194821 tim=1432151321900132
      
      

      The point here is that we have consecutive reads of 128 blocks, but the “first dba” is jumping by 256 blocks (and nearer 384 in one case), even though (trust me ?) the reads should be contiguous. This shows the possible effect on the NUMBER of waits reported for a scan of direct path reads.

      Then here’s one of the direct path reads from the problem trace file:

      WAIT #4573135368: nam='direct path read' ela= 24332 file number=101 first dba=1843136 block cnt=16 obj#=1462951 tim=79008348014855
      

      I think this is (probably) showing us that (as per Frits presentation) a single “direct path read” wait can report the time from a staggered set of async calls – I’m assuming here, though, that a 16 block read can’t really be taking close to a quarter of a second.

      Comment by Jonathan Lewis — May 20, 2015 @ 9:10 pm BST May 20,2015 | Reply

      • Hi Jonathan,
        thank you and of course we trust :-))

        This does exactly show what i have meant with “the wait event ‘direct path read’ covers all parallel async I/O calls (io_submit and io_getevents)”. In your first case it looks like 2 I/O slots (for 2 x 128) are used and in the second case maybe more due to timing as the block count does not refelect this (possibly due to the first I/O slot request was only about 16 blocks, but the other parallel ones were not).

        Regards
        Stefan

        Comment by Stefan Koehler — May 21, 2015 @ 8:49 am BST May 21,2015 | Reply


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