Oracle Scratchpad

September 20, 2016

Why Bother

Filed under: Uncategorized — Jonathan Lewis @ 11:16 am GMT Sep 20,2016

This note comes to you prompted by “Noons” in a recent twitter exchange

In response to a complaint by Lukas Eder about having to educate people in 2016 that there is no (performance) difference between count(*) and count(1), Nuno  asked me to blog about my claim that this non-difference is a good educational example on at least three different counts.

One thing I won’t count in the list of three is an actual demonstration of the non-difference. I would be surprised if anyone reading this blog needed a proof of the point, but if you’re interested here are a few examples from my past writings – including a couple where the problem becomes subtler and the “non-difference” stops happening:

You’ll notice that the earliest note I’ve published on the blog dates back 8 years or more; and one of the notes references back to a FAQ dated 2001 published on my old website. So why bother making a fuss about this non-difference when it ought to be common knowledge and really isn’t worth the effort.

  • There is a huge amount of garbage on the internet about how Oracle works and what you can to do make it work better, so when you demonstrate to someone that claims can be backed up by proof and an idea that they’ve picked up from the internet is wrong it might make them pause for thought the next time they read some unjustified claim that really matters.
  • This is a delightfully simple example to use to demonstrate how you can get a little extra information from an execution plan that could help you understand the cause of a performance problem.  (I could make the same comment about being able to get something helpful a 10053 trace file, but I won’t claim that as reason number 3)
  • Starting even with this extremely simple example that proves one point we can see what happens as we push the boundaries of what we know. Thinking about this problem teaches us how to come up with new questions and modified examples which enhance our understanding of the product.

Frankly I find it extremely tedious how often I have to explain mechanisms that I first described in Practical Oracle 8i – it can be teribly depressing to see how ignorant people can be – but there are always new people starting their careers in Oracle, the manuals they look to are more concerned with describing how to use GUIs than with explaining the technology, and the old garbage on the internet won’t go away. New arrivals have little previous experience for telling the difference between fact and fiction until someone provides the demonstration – so we keep repeating the simple examples.

My favourite quote about the internet came by way of Terry Pratchett (in “The Truth”): A lie can run round the world before the truth has got its boots on.”

You just have to keep hammering away at the truth.

 

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