Oracle Scratchpad

May 19, 2014

Ignoring Hints

Filed under: Bugs,Hints,Ignoring Hints,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:21 pm GMT May 19,2014

Does Oracle ignore hints – not if you use them correctly, and sometimes it doesn’t ignore them even when you use them incorrectly!

Here’s an example that I’ve run on 11.2.0.4 and 12.1.0.1


create table t1
as
with generator as (
	select	--+ materialize
		rownum id
	from dual
	connect by
		level <= 1e4
)
select
	rownum			id,
	rownum			n1,
	rpad('x',100)		padding
from
	generator	v1
;

begin
	dbms_stats.gather_table_stats(
		ownname		 => user,
		tabname		 =>'T1',
		method_opt	 => 'for all columns size 1'
	);
end;
/

create index t1_i1 on t1(id);
alter index t1_i1 unusable;

select n1 from t1 where id = 15;
select /*+ index(t1 (id)) */ n1 from t1 where id = 15;

Any guesses about the output from the last 4 statements ?

Index created.

Index altered.

        N1
----------
        15

1 row selected.

select /*+ index(t1 (id)) */ n1 from t1 where id = 15
*
ERROR at line 1:
ORA-01502: index 'TEST_USER.T1_I1' or partition of such index is in unusable state

That’s a pretty convincing display of Oracle not ignoring hints.

Update:

Technically, of course, I haven’t demonstrated that Oracle is not ignoring the hint (i.e. that it’s obeying the hint – if you want to avoid the double negative) until I demonstrate that in the absence of the hint the error would not occur – but that task is left as an exercise to the reader.

 

February 16, 2014

Recursive subquery factoring

Filed under: Hints,Ignoring Hints,Oracle,Subquery Factoring,Tuning — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:11 pm GMT Feb 16,2014

This is possibly my longest title to date – I try to keep them short enough to fit the right hand column of the blog without wrapping – but I couldn’t think of a good way to shorten it (Personally I prefer to use the expression CTE – common table expression – over “factored subquery” or “subquery factoring” or “with subquery”, and that would have achieved my goal, but might not have meant anything to most people.)

If you haven’t come across them before, recursive CTEs appeared in 11.2, are in the ANSI standard, and are (probably) viewed by Oracle as the strategic replacement for “connect by” queries. Here, to get things started, is a simple (and silly) example:

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February 12, 2014

Caution – hints

Filed under: Hints,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:57 pm GMT Feb 12,2014

Here’s a little example of why you should be very cautious about implementing undocumented discoveries. If you take a look at the view v$sql_hints in 11.2.0.4 you’ll discover a hint (no_)cluster_by_rowid; and if you look in v$parameter you’ll discover two new parameters _optimizer_cluster_by_rowid and _optimizer_cluster_by_rowid_control.

It doesn’t take much imagination to guess that the parameters and hint have something to do with the costs of accessing compressed data by rowid on an Exadata system (see, for example, this posting) and it’s very easy to check what the hint does:

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February 10, 2014

RAC Plans

Filed under: Execution plans,Hints,Oracle,RAC,Troubleshooting — Jonathan Lewis @ 1:12 pm GMT Feb 10,2014

Recently appeared on Mos – “Bug 18219084 : DIFFERENT EXECUTION PLAN ACROSS RAC INSTANCES”

Now, I’m not going to claim that the following applies to this particular case – but it’s perfectly reasonable to expect to see different plans for the same query on RAC, and it’s perfectly possible for the two different plans to have amazingly different performance characteristics; and in this particular case I can see an obvious reason why the two nodes could have different plans.

Here’s the query reported in the bug:

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January 3, 2014

Index Hash

Filed under: Bugs,CBO,Hints,Ignoring Hints,Index Joins,Indexing,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:56 pm GMT Jan 3,2014

I’m afraid this is one of my bad puns again – an example of the optimizer  making a real hash of the index hash join. I’m going to create a table with several indexes (some of them rather similar to each other) and execute a query that should do an index join between the obvious two indexes. To show how obvious the join should be I’m going to start with a couple of queries that show the cost of simple index fast full scans.

Here’s the data generating code:

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December 16, 2013

Unnest Oddity

Filed under: Execution plans,Hints,Oracle,subqueries — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:56 pm GMT Dec 16,2013

Here’s a little oddity I came across in 11.2.0.4 a few days ago – don’t worry too much about what the query is trying to do, or why it has been written the way I’ve done it, the only point I want to make is that I’ve got the same plan from two different strategies (according to the baseline/outline/hints), but the plans have a difference in cost.

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October 9, 2013

Hinting

Filed under: 12c,Hints,Ignoring Hints,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 5:33 pm GMT Oct 9,2013

I’ve spent so many years trying to explain that a “hint” to the Oracle optimizer is an order – if you know how to do it properly – that I finally decided to list the manual references that have made this point over the last 15 or so years. Here’s the list, which ends with a surprising change of flavour. (Emphasis in the body of the text is mine).

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September 7, 2013

Hash Joins

Filed under: CBO,Execution plans,Hints,Oracle,Tuning — Jonathan Lewis @ 12:53 pm GMT Sep 7,2013

I’ve written notes about the different join mechanisms in the past – but such things are always worth revisiting, so here’s an accumulated bundle of comments about hash joins.

A hash join takes two inputs that (in most of the Oracle literature) are referred to as the “build table” and the “probe table”. These rowsources may be extracts from real tables or indexes, or might be result sets from previous joins. Oracle uses the “build table” to build a hash table in memory, consuming and using the rowsource in a single call; it then consumes the “probe table” one row at a time, probing the in-memory hash table to find a match.

Access to the hash table is made efficient by use of a hashing function applied to the join columns – rows with the same value on the join column end up hashing to the same place in the hash table. It is possible for different input values to produce the same hash value (a hash collision) so Oracle still has to check the actual values once it has identified “probable” joins in the hash table. Because the comparison is based on a hashing mechanism, hash joins can only be used for join predicates that are equality predicates.
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June 23, 2013

Index Hints

Filed under: CBO,Hints,Indexing,Oracle,trace files — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:04 pm GMT Jun 23,2013

In my last post I made a comment about how the optimizer will use the new format of the index hint to identify an index that is an exact match if it can, and any index that starts with the same columns (in the right order) if it can’t find an exact match. It’s fairly easy to demonstrate the behaviour in 11g by examining the 10053 (CBO) trace file generated by a simple, single table, query – in fact, this is probably a case that Doug Burns might want to cite as an example of how, sometimes, the 10053 is easy to interpret (in little patches):

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June 21, 2013

Invisible ?

Filed under: Bugs,Hints,Indexing,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 7:14 am GMT Jun 21,2013

I’ll probably have to file this one under “Optimizer ignoring hints” – except that it should also go under “bugs”, and that’s one of the get-out clauses I use in my “hints are not hints” argument.

Sometimes an invisible index isn’t completely invisible.

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June 14, 2013

Hints again

Filed under: CBO,Hints,Ignoring Hints,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:17 pm GMT Jun 14,2013

A recent posting on OTN came up with a potentially interesting problem – it started roughly like this:

I have two queries like this:

select * from emp where dept_id=10 and emp_id=15;
select * from emp where dept_id=10 and emp_id=16;

When I run them separately I get the execution plan I want, but when I run a union of the two the plans change.

This, of course, is extremely unlikely – even if we assume that the two queries are more complex than the text shown. On the other hand you might, after a little thought, come up with the idea that perhaps the optimizer had done something really clever like join factorization (moving a join that’s common to the two parts of the UNION from inside to outside the UNION), or maybe there’s some really new trick the optimizer had played because a UNION ultimately requires a SORT UNIQUE, and the optimizer had chosen a different path that returned the data from each part of the UNION in sorted order to decrease the cost of that final sort.

In fact it turned out to be a lot simpler than that. The query looked more like this:

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May 28, 2013

How to hint – 2

Filed under: CBO,Hints,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 5:25 pm GMT May 28,2013

Here’s a live example demonstrating a point I’ve often made – you have to be very detailed in your hinting or Oracle will find a way to obey your hints and do the wrong thing.  A recent posting on the OTN database forum gave use the following query and execution plan:

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May 23, 2013

Dynamic Sampling – 2

Filed under: CBO,Hints,Oracle,Troubleshooting — Jonathan Lewis @ 12:46 pm GMT May 23,2013

I’ve written about dynamic sampling in the past, but here’s a little wrinkle that’s easy to miss. How do you get the optimizer to work out the correct cardinality for a query like (the table creation statement follows the query):

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February 13, 2013

STS, OFE and SPM

Filed under: dbms_xplan,Execution plans,Hints,Oracle,Upgrades — Jonathan Lewis @ 9:19 am GMT Feb 13,2013

That’s SQL Tuning Sets, optimizer_features_enable, and SQL Plan Management.

There’s a recent post on OTN describing an issue when using SQL Tuning Sets to enforce plan stability when upgrading from 10.2.0.3 to 11.2.0.3 – it doesn’t always work. Here’s a very simple model to demonstrate the type of thing that can happen (the tables are cloned from a completely different demo, so don’t ask why I picked the data they hold):

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May 24, 2012

Subquery Factoring (8)

Filed under: Execution plans,Hints,Oracle,Subquery Factoring,Tuning — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:37 pm GMT May 24,2012

I have a small collection of postings where I’ve described anomalies or limitations in subquery factoring (the “with subquery”, or Common Table Expression (CTE) to give it the official ANSI name). Here’s another example of Oracle’s code not behaving consistently. You may recognise the basic query from yesterday’s example of logical tuning – so I won’t reprint the code to generate the data sets. This examples in this note were created on 11.2.0.2 – we start with a simple query and its execution plan:
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