Oracle Scratchpad

February 28, 2014

Empty Hash

Filed under: Bugs,CBO,Execution plans,Oracle,Parallel Execution — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:45 pm BST Feb 28,2014

A little while ago I highlighted a special case with the MINUS operator (that one of the commentators extended to include the INTERSECT operator) relating to the way the second subquery would take place even if the first subquery produced no rows. I’ve since had an email from an Oracle employee letting me know that the developers looked at this case and decided that it wasn’t feasible to address it because – taking a wider view point – if the query were to run parallel they would need a mechanism that allowed some synchronisation between slaves so that every slave could find out that none of the slaves had received any rows from the first subquery, and this was going to lead to hanging problems.

The email reminded me that there’s another issue of the same kind that I discovered several years ago – I thought I’d written it up, but maybe it was on a newsgroup or forum somewhere, I can’t find it on my blog or old website). The problem can be demonstrated by this example:

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February 26, 2014

Predicate Order

Filed under: Bugs,CBO,Execution plans,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 8:14 am BST Feb 26,2014

Common internet question: does the order of predicates in the where clause make a difference.
General answer: It shouldn’t, but sometimes it will thanks to defects in the optimizer.

There’s a nicely presented example on the OTN database forum where predicate order does matter (between 10.1.x.x and 11.1.0.7). Note particularly – there’s a script to recreate the issue; note, also, the significance of the predicate section of the execution plan.
It’s bug 6782665, fixed in 11.2.0.1

January 3, 2014

Index Hash

Filed under: Bugs,CBO,Hints,Ignoring Hints,Index Joins,Indexing,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:56 pm BST Jan 3,2014

I’m afraid this is one of my bad puns again – an example of the optimizer  making a real hash of the index hash join. I’m going to create a table with several indexes (some of them rather similar to each other) and execute a query that should do an index join between the obvious two indexes. To show how obvious the join should be I’m going to start with a couple of queries that show the cost of simple index fast full scans.

Here’s the data generating code:

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December 8, 2013

12c Subqueries

Filed under: 12c,CBO,Execution plans,Oracle,subqueries — Jonathan Lewis @ 11:32 am BST Dec 8,2013

When you upgrade you often find that some little detail (of the optimizer) that didn’t receive a lot of attention in the “New Features” manuals introduces a few dramatic changes in execution plans. Here’s one example of a detail that is likely to catch a few unlucky people. We start with a very simple table which is just and id column with some padding, and then show the effect of a change in the handling of “constant subqueries”. Here’s my data set:

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November 4, 2013

Outline hassle

Filed under: CBO,Execution plans,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:17 pm BST Nov 4,2013

Here’s the output I got from a 10.2.0.5 system after generating a stored outline on a query – then dropping the index that was referenced by the stored outline and creating an alternative index. Spot the problem:

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October 2, 2013

FBI decode

Filed under: Bugs,CBO,Function based indexes,Indexing,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 8:26 am BST Oct 2,2013

It probably won’t surprise many people to hear me say that the decode() function can be a bit of a nuisance; and I’ll bet that quite a lot of people have had trouble occasionally trying to get function-based indexes that use this function to behave properly. So (to put it all together and support the general directives that case is probably a better choice than decode() and that the cast() operator is an important thing to learn) here’s an example of how function-based indexes don’t always allow you to work around bad design/code. (Note: this is a model of a problem I picked up at a client site, stripped to a minimum – you have to pretend that I’m not allowed to fix the problem by changing code).

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September 27, 2013

Virtual Stats

Filed under: CBO,Execution plans,Oracle,Statistics — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:49 am BST Sep 27,2013

Or – to be more accurate – real statistics on a virtual column.

This is one of the “10 top tips” that I came up with for my session with Maria Colgan at OOW13. A method of giving more information that might improve execution plans when you can’t change the code. I’ll start with a small data set including a virtual column (running 11.1.0.7), and a couple of problem queries:
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September 25, 2013

Extended Stats

Filed under: CBO,extended stats,Oracle,Statistics — Jonathan Lewis @ 5:06 pm BST Sep 25,2013

Here’s a little demo cut-n-pasted from a session running Oracle 12.1.0.1 (it works on 11g, too). All it does is create a table by copying from a well-known table, gather extended stats on a column group, then show you the resulting column names by querying view user_tab_cols.

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September 7, 2013

Hash Joins

Filed under: CBO,Execution plans,Hints,Oracle,Tuning — Jonathan Lewis @ 12:53 pm BST Sep 7,2013

I’ve written notes about the different join mechanisms in the past – but such things are always worth revisiting, so here’s an accumulated bundle of comments about hash joins.

A hash join takes two inputs that (in most of the Oracle literature) are referred to as the “build table” and the “probe table”. These rowsources may be extracts from real tables or indexes, or might be result sets from previous joins. Oracle uses the “build table” to build a hash table in memory, consuming and using the rowsource in a single call; it then consumes the “probe table” one row at a time, probing the in-memory hash table to find a match.

Access to the hash table is made efficient by use of a hashing function applied to the join columns – rows with the same value on the join column end up hashing to the same place in the hash table. It is possible for different input values to produce the same hash value (a hash collision) so Oracle still has to check the actual values once it has identified “probable” joins in the hash table. Because the comparison is based on a hashing mechanism, hash joins can only be used for join predicates that are equality predicates.
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August 15, 2013

MV Refresh

Filed under: Bugs,CBO,Infrastructure,Materialized view,Oracle,Statistics — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:12 pm BST Aug 15,2013

Here’s a funny little problem I came across some time ago when setting up some materialized views. I have two tables, orders and order_lines, and I’ve set up materialized view logs for them that allow a join materialized view (called orders_join) to be fast refreshable. Watch what happens if I refresh this view just before gathering stats on the order_lines table.

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August 13, 2013

NVL()

Filed under: CBO,Conditional SQL,Execution plans,NULL,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 7:14 am BST Aug 13,2013

Here’s a little detail about how the optimizer can handle the nvl() function that I hadn’t noticed before (and it goes back to at least 8i). This is running on 11.2.0.3, and table t1 is just all_objects where rownum <= 20000:

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August 5, 2013

Bloom Filter

Filed under: 12c,CBO,Execution plans,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 9:22 pm BST Aug 5,2013

I’ve posted this note as a quick way of passing on an example prompted by a twitter conversation with Timur and Maria about Bloom filters:

The Bloom filter (capital B because it’s named after a person) is not supposed to appear in Oracle plans unless the query is executing in parallel but here’s an example which seems to use a serial Bloom filter.  Running in 11.2.0.3 and 12.1.0.1 (the results shown are the latter – the numbers are slightly different between versions):

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July 27, 2013

Clustering_factor

Filed under: CBO,Indexing,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 7:21 am BST Jul 27,2013

The clustering_factor is one of the most important numbers (if not the most important number) affecting the optimizer’s choice of execution plan – it’s the thing that has the most significant effect on the optimizer’s decision on whether to choose a table scan or an index, and on which index to choose.

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July 24, 2013

Linear Decay

Filed under: CBO,Oracle,Statistics — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:11 pm BST Jul 24,2013

I’ve mentioned “linear decay” in several posts when explaining a problem that someone has seen with an execution path – but I’ve recently realised that I don’t have a post describing what it is and how it works – although it’s in Cost Based Oracle – Fundamentals, of course, if you want some detail – so here’s a brief introduction (based on simple stats with no histograms).

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July 12, 2013

Wrong Index 2

Filed under: CBO,Oracle,trace files,Troubleshooting — Jonathan Lewis @ 5:17 pm BST Jul 12,2013

A couple of days ago I wrote an article about Oracle picking the “wrong index” after an index rebuild, and I mentioned that the sample data I had generated looked a little odd because it came from a script I had been using to investigate a completely different problem. This note describes that other problem, which appeared on the Oracle-L mailing list last month.

Stripped to a bare minimum, here’s the issue: we have a simple query against a single table with two indexes IDX2_AUFTRAG(arsAuftragsNr, dategAuftragsNr) and IDX7_AUFTRAG(arsAuftragsNr), and a predicate “arsAuftragsNr = {constant}”. Since the second column in the two-column index is irrelevant (we can’t use it to avoid visiting the table, and it’s not part of a group by or order by clause), and since adding a column to an index is likely to increase the clustering_factor and leaf block count of the index, we would probably expect to see Oracle pick the single column index as the path to the table – but it doesn’t, it picks the two-column index.

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