Oracle Scratchpad

September 7, 2013

Hash Joins

Filed under: CBO,Execution plans,Hints,Oracle,Tuning — Jonathan Lewis @ 12:53 pm GMT Sep 7,2013

I’ve written notes about the different join mechanisms in the past – but such things are always worth revisiting, so here’s an accumulated bundle of comments about hash joins.

A hash join takes two inputs that (in most of the Oracle literature) are referred to as the “build table” and the “probe table”. These rowsources may be extracts from real tables or indexes, or might be result sets from previous joins. Oracle uses the “build table” to build a hash table in memory, consuming and using the rowsource in a single call; it then consumes the “probe table” one row at a time, probing the in-memory hash table to find a match.

Access to the hash table is made efficient by use of a hashing function applied to the join columns – rows with the same value on the join column end up hashing to the same place in the hash table. It is possible for different input values to produce the same hash value (a hash collision) so Oracle still has to check the actual values once it has identified “probable” joins in the hash table. Because the comparison is based on a hashing mechanism, hash joins can only be used for join predicates that are equality predicates.
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June 23, 2013

Index Hints

Filed under: CBO,Hints,Indexing,Oracle,trace files — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:04 pm GMT Jun 23,2013

In my last post I made a comment about how the optimizer will use the new format of the index hint to identify an index that is an exact match if it can, and any index that starts with the same columns (in the right order) if it can’t find an exact match. It’s fairly easy to demonstrate the behaviour in 11g by examining the 10053 (CBO) trace file generated by a simple, single table, query – in fact, this is probably a case that Doug Burns might want to cite as an example of how, sometimes, the 10053 is easy to interpret (in little patches):

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June 21, 2013

Invisible ?

Filed under: Bugs,Hints,Indexing,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 7:14 am GMT Jun 21,2013

I’ll probably have to file this one under “Optimizer ignoring hints” – except that it should also go under “bugs”, and that’s one of the get-out clauses I use in my “hints are not hints” argument.

Sometimes an invisible index isn’t completely invisible.

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June 14, 2013

Hints again

Filed under: CBO,Hints,Ignoring Hints,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:17 pm GMT Jun 14,2013

A recent posting on OTN came up with a potentially interesting problem – it started roughly like this:

I have two queries like this:

select * from emp where dept_id=10 and emp_id=15;
select * from emp where dept_id=10 and emp_id=16;

When I run them separately I get the execution plan I want, but when I run a union of the two the plans change.

This, of course, is extremely unlikely – even if we assume that the two queries are more complex than the text shown. On the other hand you might, after a little thought, come up with the idea that perhaps the optimizer had done something really clever like join factorization (moving a join that’s common to the two parts of the UNION from inside to outside the UNION), or maybe there’s some really new trick the optimizer had played because a UNION ultimately requires a SORT UNIQUE, and the optimizer had chosen a different path that returned the data from each part of the UNION in sorted order to decrease the cost of that final sort.

In fact it turned out to be a lot simpler than that. The query looked more like this:

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May 28, 2013

How to hint – 2

Filed under: CBO,Hints,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 5:25 pm GMT May 28,2013

Here’s a live example demonstrating a point I’ve often made – you have to be very detailed in your hinting or Oracle will find a way to obey your hints and do the wrong thing.  A recent posting on the OTN database forum gave use the following query and execution plan:

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May 23, 2013

Dynamic Sampling – 2

Filed under: CBO,Hints,Oracle,Troubleshooting — Jonathan Lewis @ 12:46 pm GMT May 23,2013

I’ve written about dynamic sampling in the past, but here’s a little wrinkle that’s easy to miss. How do you get the optimizer to work out the correct cardinality for a query like (the table creation statement follows the query):

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February 13, 2013

STS, OFE and SPM

Filed under: dbms_xplan,Execution plans,Hints,Oracle,Upgrades — Jonathan Lewis @ 9:19 am GMT Feb 13,2013

That’s SQL Tuning Sets, optimizer_features_enable, and SQL Plan Management.

There’s a recent post on OTN describing an issue when using SQL Tuning Sets to enforce plan stability when upgrading from 10.2.0.3 to 11.2.0.3 – it doesn’t always work. Here’s a very simple model to demonstrate the type of thing that can happen (the tables are cloned from a completely different demo, so don’t ask why I picked the data they hold):

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May 24, 2012

Subquery Factoring (8)

Filed under: Execution plans,Hints,Oracle,Subquery Factoring,Tuning — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:37 pm GMT May 24,2012

I have a small collection of postings where I’ve described anomalies or limitations in subquery factoring (the “with subquery”, or Common Table Expression (CTE) to give it the official ANSI name). Here’s another example of Oracle’s code not behaving consistently. You may recognise the basic query from yesterday’s example of logical tuning – so I won’t reprint the code to generate the data sets. This examples in this note were created on 11.2.0.2 – we start with a simple query and its execution plan:
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May 23, 2012

Logical tuning

Filed under: Hints,Ignoring Hints,Oracle,Performance,Tuning — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:22 pm GMT May 23,2012

Here’s a model of a problem I solved quite recently at a client site. The client’s query was much more complex and the volume of data much larger, but this tiny, two table, example is sufficient to demonstrate the key principle. (Originally I thought I’d have to use three tables to model the problem, which is why you may find my choice of table names a little odd). I ran this example on 11.2.0.2 – which was the client version:
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February 16, 2012

Subquery Factoring (7)

Filed under: Hints,Infrastructure,Oracle,Subquery Factoring,Tuning,Upgrades — Jonathan Lewis @ 5:03 pm GMT Feb 16,2012

When I wrote a note last week about the fixes to the subquery factoring optimizer code in 11.2.0.3, I finished with a comment about having more to say on the test case if I materialized the subquery. Today’s the day to talk about it. As a reminder, here’s the query, but with the /*+ materialize */ hint in place:
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January 13, 2012

Quiz Night

Filed under: Hints,Indexing,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:41 pm GMT Jan 13,2012

Browsing a little history recently I came across a note I’d written about the new-style index hint. In that note I claimed that:


… the index has to start with the columns (product_group, id) in that order – with preference given to an exact match, otherwise using the lowest cost index that starts the right way.

On reading this statement I suddenly realised that I hadn’t actually proved (to myself, even) that if I had the indexes (product_group, id) and (product_group, id, other_col) then a two-column hint forced Oracle to use the two column index in all (legal) circumstances.

So, tonight’s quiz – are there any edge cases, and what easy ways can you think of to prove (or disprove) the claim for the general case.

Footnote: you don’t have to demonstrate the method, just a brief outline of the idea will be sufficient.
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November 24, 2011

Index Hints

Filed under: Hints,Indexing,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 12:41 pm GMT Nov 24,2011

A new form of index hint appeared in 10g – and it’s becoming more common to see it in production code; instead of naming indexes in index hints, we describe them. Consider the following hint (expressed in two ways, first as it appeared in the outline section of an execution plan, then cosmetically adjusted to look more like the way you would write it in your SQL):

INDEX(@"SEL$1" "PRD"@"SEL$1" ("PRODUCTS"."PRODUCT_GROUP" "PRODUCTS"."ID"))
index(@sel$1 prd@sel$1(product_group  id))

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November 18, 2011

Hinting

Filed under: Execution plans,Hints,Ignoring Hints,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 12:54 pm GMT Nov 18,2011

As I’ve often pointed out, this blog isn’t AskTom, or the OTN forum, so I don’t expect to have people asking me to solve their problems; neither do I answer email questions about specific problems. Occasionally, though, questions do appear that are worth a little public airing, and one of these came in by email a couple of weeks ago. The question is longer than the answer I sent, my contribution to the exchange doesn’t start until the heading: “My Reply”.
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June 8, 2011

How to hint – 1

Filed under: dbms_xplan,Execution plans,Hints,Oracle,subqueries,Troubleshooting — Jonathan Lewis @ 3:00 pm GMT Jun 8,2011

Here’s a quick tutorial in hinting, promped by a question on the OTN database forum.
The OP has a hash semi-join and Oracle appears to be ignoring a hint to use a nested loop:

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January 16, 2011

Ignoring hints

Filed under: Hints,Ignoring Hints,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 10:32 pm GMT Jan 16,2011

Yes, finally, really ignoring hints – but it’s a sort of bug, of course.

Thanks to Timur Akhmadeev for telling us about bug 8432870 (you’ll need an account on MOS for the link) in his reply to Charles Hooper’s recent post.

In the upgrade from 9i to 10g there was a change in the “hint parser”. If you put a valid SQL keyword inside the hint delimiters (the note says /*+  */ but doesn’t mention the –+ alternative for specifying a hint, thought it’s probably still true there) when the keyword is not a valid hint – for example the word NOLOGGING which I have seen people use as if it were a hint – then Oracle will ignore all the hints.

Earlier versions of Oracle simply noticed that you had embedded something that wasn’t a valid hint, but that didn’t stop the parser from reading the rest of the hints correctly.

If the invalid hint is not a valid SQL keyword then there are no nasty side effects.

This might explain why I ran into an odd problem a little while ago when I added a comment to my  hint list and found that the hints stopped working. I can’t remember the exact details any more but I think my comment was something along the lines of: “Do not … because …”, and this broke the hints until I changed it to “Don’t … because …”.

[Further reading on “ignoring hints”]

 

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