Oracle Scratchpad

January 19, 2018

Nested MVs

Filed under: 12c,Bugs,Infrastructure,Materialized view,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 2:43 pm GMT Jan 19,2018

A recent client was seeing a very large redo penalty from refreshing materialized views. Unfortunately they had to be refreshed very frequently, and were being handled with a complete refresh in atomic mode – which means delete every row from every MV then re-insert every row.  The total redo was running at about 5GB per hour, which wasn’t a problem for throughput, but the space for handling backup and recovery was getting a bit extreme.

The requirement consisted of two MVs which extracted and aggregated row and column subsets in two different ways from a single table; then two MVs that aggregated one of the first MVs in two different ways; then two MVs which each joined one of the first level MVs to one of the scond level MVs.

No problem – join MVs are legal, aggregate MVs are legal, “nested” MVs are legal: all you have to do is create the right MV logs and pick the right refresh command.  Since the client was also running Standard Editions (SE2) there was no need to worry about how to ensure that query rewrite would work (feature not implemented on SE).

So here, simplified and camouflaged, is a minimum subset of just the first few stages of the construction: a base table with MV log, one first-level aggregate MV with its own MV log, and two aggregate MVs based on the first MV.

drop materialized view log on req_line;
drop materialized view log on jpl_req_group_numlines;

drop materialized view jpl_req_group_numlines;
drop materialized view jpl_req_numsel;
drop materialized view jpl_req_basis;

drop table req_line;

-- ----------
-- Base Table
-- ----------

create table req_line(
        eventid         number(10,0),
        selected        number(10,0),
        req             number(10,0),
        basis           number(10,0),
        lnid            number(10,0),
        area            varchar2(10),
        excess          number(10,0),
        available       number(10,0),
        kk_id           number(10,0),
        eventdate       number(10,0),
        rs_id           number(10,0)
)
;

-- --------------------
-- MV log on base table
-- --------------------

create materialized view log 
on
req_line
with rowid(
        req, basis, lnid, eventid, selected, area,
        excess, available, kk_id, eventdate, rs_id
)
including new values
;

-- --------------------
-- Level 1 aggregate MV
-- --------------------

create materialized view jpl_req_group_numlines(
        eventid, selected, 
        row_ct, req_ct, basis_ct, req, basis, 
        maxlnid, excess, numsel, area, available, kk_id, 
        rs_id, eventdate
)
segment creation immediate
build immediate
refresh fast on demand 
as 
select 
        eventid,
        selected,
        count(*)        row_ct,
        count(req)      req_ct,
        count(basis)    basis_ct,
        sum(req)        req,
        sum(basis)      basis,
        max(lnid)       maxlnid,
        excess,
        count(selected) numsel,
        area,
        available,
        kk_id,
        rs_id,
        eventdate
from 
        req_line
group by 
        eventid, selected, area, excess,
        available, kk_id, eventdate, rs_id
;

-- ------------------------
-- MV log on first level MV
-- ------------------------

create materialized view log 
on
jpl_req_group_numlines
with rowid 
(
        eventid, area, selected, available,
        basis, req, maxlnid, numsel
)
including new values
;


-- ----------------------------
-- First "level 2" aggregate MV
-- ----------------------------

create materialized view jpl_req_numsel(
        eventid, selected, 
        row_ct, totalreq_ct, totalbasis_ct, totalreq, totalbasis, 
        maxlnid, numsel_ct, numsel, area
)
segment creation immediate
build immediate
refresh fast on demand
as 
select 
        eventid,
        selected,
        count(*)        row_ct,
        count(req)      req_ct,
        count(basis)    basis_ct,
        sum(req)        req,
        sum(basis)      basis,
        max(maxlnid)    maxlnid,
        count(numsel)   numsel_ct,
        sum(numsel)     numsel,
        area
from 
        jpl_req_group_numlines
group by 
        eventid, selected, area
;


-- -----------------------------
-- Second "level 2" aggregate MV
-- -----------------------------

create materialized view jpl_req_basis(
        eventid, 
        row_ct, totalbasis_ct, totalreq_ct, totalbasis, totalreq, 
        area, selected, available, maxlnid ,
        numsel_ct, numsel
)
segment creation immediate
build immediate
refresh fast on demand
as 
select 
        eventid,
        count(*)        row_ct,
        count(basis)    totalbasis_ct,
        count(req)      totalreq_ct,
        sum(basis)      totalbasis,
        sum(req)        totalreq,
        area,
        selected,
        available,
        max(maxlnid)    maxlnid,
        count(numsel)   numsel,
        sum(numsel)     numsel
from
        jpl_req_group_numlines
group by 
        eventid, area, available, selected
;

Once the table, MV logs and MVs exist we can insert some data into the base table, then try refreshing the views. I have tried three different calls to the dbms_refresh package, dbms_mview.refresh_all_mviews(), dbms_mview.refresh_dependent(), and dbms_mview.refresh(), specifying the ‘F’ (fast) refresh method, atomic refresh, and nested. All three fail in the same way on 12.2.0.1. The code below shows only the refresh_dependent() call.

I’ve included a query to report the current state of the materialized views before and after the calls, and set a two second sleep before the refresh so that changes in “last refresh” time will appear. The final queries are just to check that the expected volume of data has been transferred to the materialized views.


-- ------------------------------------
-- Insert some data into the base table
-- ------------------------------------

begin
        for i in 1..100 loop
                execute immediate 'insert into req_line values( :xxx, :xxx, :xxx, :xxx, :xxx, :xxx, :xxx, :xxx, :xxx, :xxx, :xxx)' 
                using i,i,i,i,i,i,i,i,i,i,i;
                commit;
        end loop;
end;
/

set linesize 144
column mview_name format a40

select
        mview_name, staleness, compile_state, last_refresh_type, 
        to_char(last_refresh_date,'dd-mon hh24:mi:ss')          ref_time
from
        user_mviews
ORDER by
        last_refresh_date, mview_name
;

prompt  Waiting for 2 seconds to allow refresh time to change

execute dbms_lock.sleep(2)

declare
        m_fail_ct       number(6,0);
begin
        dbms_mview.refresh_dependent(
                number_of_failures      => m_fail_ct,
                list                    => 'req_line',
                method                  => 'F',
                nested                  => true,
                atomic_refresh          => true
        );

        dbms_output.put_line('Failures: ' || m_fail_ct);
end;
/

select
        mview_name, staleness, compile_state, last_refresh_type, 
        to_char(last_refresh_date,'dd-mon hh24:mi:ss')          ref_time
from
        user_mviews
order by
        last_refresh_date, mview_name
;

-- --------------------------------
-- Should be 100 rows in each table
-- --------------------------------

select count(*) from jpl_req_basis;
select count(*) from jpl_req_group_numlines;
select count(*) from jpl_req_numsel;

Both the earlier versions of Oracle are happy with this code and refresh all three materialized view without fail. Oracle 12.2.0.1 crashes the procedure call with a deadlock error which, when traced, shows itself to be a self-deadlock while attempting to select a data dictionary row for update:


MVIEW_NAME                               STALENESS	     COMPILE_STATE	 LAST_REF REF_TIME
---------------------------------------- ------------------- ------------------- -------- ------------------------
JPL_REQ_BASIS                            FRESH		     VALID		 COMPLETE 19-jan 14:03:01
JPL_REQ_GROUP_NUMLINES			 NEEDS_COMPILE	     NEEDS_COMPILE	 COMPLETE 19-jan 14:03:01
JPL_REQ_NUMSEL                           FRESH		     VALID		 COMPLETE 19-jan 14:03:01

3 rows selected.

Waiting for 2 seconds to allow refresh time to change

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

declare
*
ERROR at line 1:
ORA-00060: deadlock detected while waiting for resource
ORA-06512: at "SYS.DBMS_SNAPSHOT_KKXRCA", line 2952
ORA-06512: at "SYS.DBMS_SNAPSHOT_KKXRCA", line 85
ORA-06512: at "SYS.DBMS_SNAPSHOT_KKXRCA", line 245
ORA-06512: at "SYS.DBMS_SNAPSHOT_KKXRCA", line 1243
ORA-06512: at "SYS.DBMS_SNAPSHOT_KKXRCA", line 2414
ORA-06512: at "SYS.DBMS_SNAPSHOT_KKXRCA", line 2908
ORA-06512: at "SYS.DBMS_SNAPSHOT_KKXRCA", line 3699
ORA-06512: at "SYS.DBMS_SNAPSHOT_KKXRCA", line 3723
ORA-06512: at "SYS.DBMS_SNAPSHOT", line 75
ORA-06512: at line 4


MVIEW_NAME				 STALENESS	     COMPILE_STATE	 LAST_REF REF_TIME
---------------------------------------- ------------------- ------------------- -------- ------------------------
JPL_REQ_NUMSEL                           NEEDS_COMPILE	     NEEDS_COMPILE	 COMPLETE 19-jan 14:03:01
JPL_REQ_BASIS                            FRESH		     VALID		 FAST	  19-jan 14:03:04
JPL_REQ_GROUP_NUMLINES                   FRESH		     VALID		 FAST	  19-jan 14:03:04

The deadlock graph from the trace file, with a little extra surrounding information, looks like this:


Deadlock graph:
                                          ------------Blocker(s)-----------  ------------Waiter(s)------------
Resource Name                             process session holds waits serial  process session holds waits serial
TX-00020009-00000C78-A9B090F8-00000000         26      14     X        40306      26      14           X  40306


*** 2018-01-19T14:18:03.925859+00:00 (ORCL(3))
dbkedDefDump(): Starting a non-incident diagnostic dump (flags=0x0, level=1, mask=0x0)
----- Error Stack Dump -----
----- Current SQL Statement for this session (sql_id=2vnzfjzg6px33) -----
select log, oldest, oldest_pk, oldest_oid, oldest_new, youngest+1/86400,  flag, yscn, oldest_seq, oscn, oscn_pk, oscn_oid, oscn_new, oscn_seq  from sys.mlog$ where mowner = :1 and master = :2 for update
----- PL/SQL Stack -----

So far I haven’t been able to spot whether or not I’m doing something wrong, or prohibited, and I haven’t been able to find a matching problem on MoS. Since the code works on 11gR2 and 12cR1 I’m inclined to believe it’s a bug introduced in the 12cR2 timeline – which is a nuisance for my client, but if it is a bug then perhaps a fix will appear fairly promptly.

July 12, 2016

Union All MV

Filed under: Infrastructure,Materialized view,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 10:10 am GMT Jul 12,2016

In an article I wrote last week about Bloom filters disappearing as you changed a SELECT to a (conventional) INSERT/SELECT I suggested using the subquery_pruning() hint to make the optimizer fall back to an older strategy of partition pruning. My example showed this working with a range partitioned table but one of the readers reported a problem when trying to apply the strategy to a composite range/hash partitioned table and followed this up with an execution plan of a select statement with a Bloom filter where the subquery_pruning() hint didn’t introduced subquery pruning when the select was used for an insert.

A couple of standard ways to work around this probelm are to embed the select statement in a pipeline function so that we can “insert into table select from table(pipeline_function)”, or to write a pl/sql block that opens a cursor to do a select with bulk collect and loops through an array insert. The overhead in both cases is likely to be relatively small (especially when compared with the overhead of failing to filter). In this case, however, the reader suggested that maybe the problem appeared because the driving table (i.e. the one that would have been query to derive the pruning values) was actually an inline view with a union all.

After modifying my working model to try a couple of different tests I was inclined to agree. Since the two tables in the view looked as if they were likely to be relatively tiny and static I suggested that it would be safe to create a materialized view defined to “refresh on commit” and then use the materialized view explicitly in the query. This, finally, brings me to the point of today’s article – how do you create such a materialized view ?

I’m going to start by creating a couple of small base tables from a familiar object:


create table tt as select * from all_objects where object_type = 'TABLE';
create table tv as select * from all_objects where object_type = 'VIEW';

alter table tt add constraint tt_pk primary key (object_id);
alter table tv add constraint tv_pk primary key (object_id);

begin
        dbms_stats.gather_table_stats(
                ownname          => user,
                tabname          =>'TT',
                method_opt       => 'for all columns size 1'
        );
        dbms_stats.gather_table_stats(
                ownname          => user,
                tabname          =>'TV',
                method_opt       => 'for all columns size 1'
        );
end;
/

Assume, now, that I need an inline view that is interested in the things you will recognise from the above as the tables owned by OUTLN (which will apper in tt) and the views owned by SYSTEM (which will appear in tv) – in the 11.2.0.4 system I’m playing on at the moment that’s three rows from each of the two tables). Here’s the SQL I’d put into the inline view:


select
        object_id, object_type, object_name
from    tt
where   owner = 'OUTLN'
union all
select
        object_id, object_type, object_name
from    tv
where   owner = 'SYSTEM'
;

Since this view won’t give me partition pruning I have to replace it with a table and because I want to ensure that the table is always up to date I have to generate it as the container for a materialized view with refresh on commit. First I need some materialized view logs so that I can do a fast refresh:


create materialized view log on tt
with
        rowid, primary key
        (object_type, object_name, owner)
including new values
;

create materialized view log on tv
with
        rowid, primary key
        (object_type, object_name, owner)
including new values
;

I’ve included the primary key in the definition because I happen to want the object_id column in the log – but I could just have included it as a column in the filter list. I’ve included the rowid in the definition because Oracle needs the rowid if it’s going to be able to do a fast refresh. I can now create a materialized view:


create materialized view mv_t
        build immediate
        refresh fast on commit
as
select
        'T' mv_marker,
        rowid rid,
        object_id, object_type, object_name
from    tt
where   owner = 'OUTLN'
union all
select
        'V' mv_marker,
        rowid rid,
        object_id, object_type, object_name
from    tv
where   owner = 'SYSTEM'
;

I’ve taken the option to “build immediate” and specified – most importantly for my needs – “refresh on commit”. You’ll notice I haven’t chosen to “enable query rewrite”; for the purposes of this demo I don’t need that particular feature.

There are two key features to the materialized view that are a little special – first I’ve included the rowid of each source table as a named column in the materialized view; as I mentioned above Oracle will not allow the view to be fast refreshable without the rowid. The second feature is that I’ve introduced a literal value into the view which I’ve named mv_marker; this makes it easy to see which table a row comes from when you query the materialized view … and Oracle needs to see this.

That’s the job done. Just to demonstrate that my materialized view is working as required here’s a little more SQL (following by the output):


select * from mv_t;

delete from tt where object_name = 'OL$';
update tv set object_name = 'PRODUCT_PRIVILEGES' where object_name = 'PRODUCT_PRIVS';

commit;

select * from mv_t;

=======================================

M RID                 OBJECT_ID OBJECT_TYPE         OBJECT_NAME
- ------------------ ---------- ------------------- --------------------------------
T AAA6tXAAFAAAAEBAAI        471 TABLE               OL$
T AAA6tXAAFAAAAEBAAJ        474 TABLE               OL$HINTS
T AAA6tXAAFAAAAEBAAK        478 TABLE               OL$NODES
V AAA6tWAAFAAAACgABI       8260 VIEW                SCHEDULER_PROGRAM_ARGS
V AAA6tWAAFAAAACgABJ       8261 VIEW                SCHEDULER_JOB_ARGS
V AAA6tWAAFAAAACuAA7      14233 VIEW                PRODUCT_PRIVS

6 rows selected.

2 rows deleted.


1 row updated.


Commit complete.


M RID                 OBJECT_ID OBJECT_TYPE         OBJECT_NAME
- ------------------ ---------- ------------------- --------------------------------
T AAA6tXAAFAAAAEBAAJ        474 TABLE               OL$HINTS
T AAA6tXAAFAAAAEBAAK        478 TABLE               OL$NODES
V AAA6tWAAFAAAACgABI       8260 VIEW                SCHEDULER_PROGRAM_ARGS
V AAA6tWAAFAAAACgABJ       8261 VIEW                SCHEDULER_JOB_ARGS
V AAA6tWAAFAAAACuAA7      14233 VIEW                PRODUCT_PRIVILEGES

5 rows selected.

If you’re wondering why you see “2 rows deleted” but a reduction by just one row in the final output, remember that we’re deleting from table tt but the materialized view holds information about just the subset of tables owned by OUTLN – I happen to have a row in tt that says SYSTEM also owns a table called OL$.

Assistance

If you have trouble working out why your attempts to create a particular materialized view aren’t working the dbms_mview package has a procedure called explain_mview that may give you enough ideas to work out what you’re doing wrong. For example, here’s how I could find out that I needed a literal column to tag the two parts of my union all view:


@$ORACLE_HOME/rdbms/admin/utlxmv.sql

begin
        dbms_mview.explain_mview (
                q'{
                create materialized view mv_t
                        build immediate
                        refresh fast
                        enable query rewrite
                as
                select  -- 'T' mv_marker,
                        rowid rid,
                        object_id, object_type, object_name from tt
                union all
                select  -- 'V' mv_marker,
                        rowid rid,
                        object_id, object_type, object_name from tv
                }'
        );
end;
/

column cap_class noprint
column related_text format a7
column short_msg format a72
break on cap_class skip 1

select
        substr(capability_name,1,3) cap_class,
        capability_name, possible, related_text, substr(msgtxt,1,70) short_msg
from
        mv_capabilities_table
where
        mvname = 'MV_T'
order by
        substr(capability_name,1,3), related_num, seq
;

The first line calls a supplied script to create a table called mv_capabilities_table in the current schema. The call to dbms_mview.explain_mview passes the text of a “create materialized view” statement to the procedure (there are a couple of variations possible) then, after a couple of SQL*Plus formatting commands I’ve queried the table to see Oracle’s analysis for the statement. (You can tag each call to this procedure using a second parameter that I haven’t bothered to use.)

Here’s the output for the failed attempt above, which has commented out the literals that tag the two parts of the UNION ALL:

CAPABILITY_NAME                POS RELATED SHORT_MSG
------------------------------ --- ------- ------------------------------------------------------------------------
PCT_TABLE                      N   TT      relation is not a partitioned table
PCT_TABLE_REWRITE              N   TT      relation is not a partitioned table
PCT_TABLE                      N   TV      relation is not a partitioned table
PCT_TABLE_REWRITE              N   TV      relation is not a partitioned table
PCT                            N

REFRESH_COMPLETE               Y
REFRESH_FAST                   N
REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_INSERT      N           the materialized view does not have a UNION ALL marker column
REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_INSERT      N           set operator in a context not supported for fast refresh
REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ONETAB_DML  N           see the reason why REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_INSERT is disabled
REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ANY_DML     N           see the reason why REFRESH_FAST_AFTER_ONETAB_DML is disabled
REFRESH_FAST_PCT               N           PCT FAST REFRESH is not possible if query has set operand query blocks

REWRITE                        Y
REWRITE_FULL_TEXT_MATCH        Y
REWRITE_PARTIAL_TEXT_MATCH     N           set operator encountered in mv
REWRITE_GENERAL                N           set operator encountered in mv
REWRITE_PCT                    N           general rewrite is not possible or PCT is not possible on any of the d


17 rows selected.

The query manages to split the output into three sections (but that depends on a side-effect in a way that I would normally call bad design): elements relating to “Partition Change Tracking”, elements relating to “Materialized View Refresh” and elements relating to “Query Rewrite”. You’ll notice that the rewrite section tells me that (even though I haven’t chosen to enable it) my view could be enabled to do query rewrite.

Critically, though, this version of the materialized view can’t be fast refreshed, and we see the key reason in the first “Refresh fast after insert” line: “the materialized view does not have a UNION ALL marker column”. That’s how I know I have to include a literal column that has a different value in each of the two parts of the UNION ALL.

March 26, 2015

12c MView refresh

Filed under: 12c,Infrastructure,Materialized view,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 1:19 pm GMT Mar 26,2015

Some time ago I wrote a blog note describing a hack for refreshing a large materialized view with minimum overhead by taking advantage of a single-partition partitioned table. This note describes how Oracle 12c now gives you an official way of doing something similar – the “out of place” refresh.

I’ll start by creating a matieralized view and creating a couple of indexes on the resulting underlying table; then show you three different calls to refresh the view. The materialized view is based on all_objects so it can’t be made available for query rewrite (ORA-30354: Query rewrite not allowed on SYS relations) , and I haven’t created any materialized view logs so there’s no question of fast refreshes – but all I intend to do here is show you the relative impact of a complete refresh.


create materialized view mv_objects nologging
build immediate
refresh on demand
as
select
        *
from
        all_objects
;

begin
	dbms_stats.gather_table_stats(
		ownname		 => user,
		tabname		 =>'mv_objects',
		method_opt 	 => 'for all columns size 1'
	);
end;
/

create index mv_obj_i1 on mv_objects(object_name) nologging compress;
create index mv_obj_i2 on mv_objects(object_type, owner, data_object_id) nologging compress 2;

This was a default install of 12c, so there were about 85,000 rows in the view. You’ll notice that I’ve created all the objects as “nologging” – this will have an effect on the work done during some of the refreshes.

Here are the three variants I used – all declared explicitly as complete refreshes:


begin
	dbms_mview.refresh(
		list			=> 'MV_OBJECTS',
		method			=> 'C',
		atomic_refresh		=> true
	);
end;
/

begin
	dbms_mview.refresh(
		list			=> 'MV_OBJECTS',
		method			=> 'C',
		atomic_refresh		=> false
	);
end;
/

begin
	dbms_mview.refresh(
		list			=> 'MV_OBJECTS',
		method			=> 'C',
		atomic_refresh		=> false,
		out_of_place		=> true
	);
end;
/

The first one (atomic_refresh=>true) is the one you have to use if you want to refresh several materialized views simultaneously and keep them self consistent, or if you want to ensure that the data doesn’t temporarily disappear if all you’re worried about is a single view. The refresh works by deleting all the rows from the materialized view then executing the definition to generate and insert the replacement rows before committing. This generates a lot of undo and redo – especially if you have indexes on the materialized view as these have to be maintained “row by row” and may leave users accessing and applying a lot of undo for read-consistency purposes. An example at a recent client site refreshed a table of 6.5M rows with two indexes, taking about 10 minutes to refresh, generating 7GB of redo as it ran, and performing 350,000 “physical reads for flashback new”. This strategy does not take advantage of the nologging nature of the objects – and as a side effect of the delete/insert cycle you’re likely to see the indexes grow to roughly twice their optimal size and you may see the statistic “recursive aborts on index block reclamation” climbing as the indexes are maintained.

The second option (atomic_refresh => false) is quick and efficient – but may result in wrong results showing up in any code that references the materialized view (whether explicitly or by rewrite). The session truncates the underlying table, sets any indexes on it unusable, then reloads the table with an insert /*+ append */. The append means you get virtually no undo generated, and if the table is declared nologging you get virtually no redo. In my case, the session then dispatched two jobs to rebuild the two indexes – and since the indexes were declared nologging the rebuilds generated virtually no redo. (I could have declared them with pctfree 0, which would also have made them as small as possible).

The final option is the 12c variant – the setting atomic_refresh => false is mandatory if we want  out_of_place => true. With these settings the session will create a new table with a name of the form RV$xxxxxx where xxxxxx is the hexadecimal version of the new object id, insert the new data into that table (though not using the /*+ append */ hint), create the indexes on that table (again with names like RV$xxxxxx – where xxxxxx is the index’s object_id). Once the new data has been indexed Oracle will do some name-switching in the data dictionary (shades of exchange partition) to make the new version of the materialized view visible. A quirky detail of the process is that the initial create of the new table and the final drop of the old table don’t show up in the trace file  [Ed: wrong, see comment #1] although the commands to drop and create indexes do appear. (The original table, though it’s dropped after the name switching, is not purged from the recyclebin.) The impact on undo and redo generation is significant – because the table is empty and has no indexes when the insert takes place the insert creates a lot less undo and redo than it would if the table had been emptied by a bulk delete – even though the insert is a normal insert and not an append; then the index creation honours my nologging definition, so produces very little redo. At the client site above, the redo generated dropped from 7GB to 200MB, and the time dropped to 200 seconds which was 99% CPU time.

Limitations, traps, and opportunities

The manuals say that the out of place refresh can only be used for materialized views that are joins or aggregates and, surprisingly, you actually can’t use the method on a view that simply extracts a subset of rows and columns from a single table.  There’s a simple workaround, though – join the table to DUAL (or some other single row table if you want to enable query rewrite).

Because the out of place refresh does an ordinary insert into a new table the resulting table will have no statistics – you’ll have to add a call to gather them. (If you’ve previously been using a non-atomic refreshes this won’t be a new problem, of course). The indexes will have up to date statistics, of course, because they will have been created after the table insert.

The big opportunity, of course, is to change a very expensive atomic refresh into a much cheaper out of place refresh – in some special cases. My client had to use the atomic_refresh=>true option in 11g because they couldn’t afford to leave the table truncated (empty) for the few minutes it took to rebuild; but they might be okay using the out_of_place => true with atomic_refresh=>false in 12c because:

  • the period when something might break is brief
  • if something does go wrong the users won’t get wrong (silently missing) results, they’ll an Oracle error (probably ORA-08103: object no longer exists)
  • the application uses this particular materialized view directly (i.e. not through query rewrite), and the query plans are all quick, light-weight indexed access paths
  • most queries will probably run correctly even if they run through the moment of exchange

I don’t think we could guarantee that last statement – and Oracle Corp. may not officially confirm it – and it doesn’t matter how many times I show queries succeeding but it’s true. Thanks to “cross-DDL read-consistency” as it was called in 8i when partition-exchange appeared and because the old objects still exist in the data files, provided your query doesn’t hit a block that has been overwritten by a new object, or request a space management block that was zero-ed out on the “drop” a running query can keep on using the old location for an object after it has been replaced by a newer version. If you want to make the mechanism as safe as possible you can help – put each relevant materialized view (along with its indexes) into its own tablespace so that the only thing that is going to overwrite an earlier version of the view is the stuff you create on the next refresh.

 

September 11, 2013

MV Refresh

Filed under: compression,Infrastructure,Materialized view,Oracle,Partitioning,Performance — Jonathan Lewis @ 8:47 pm GMT Sep 11,2013

I have a fairly strong preference for choosing simple solutions over complex solutions, and using Oracle-supplied packages over writing custom code – provided the difference in cost (whether that’s in human effort, run-time resources or licence fees) is acceptable. Sometimes, though, the gap between simplicity and cost is so extreme that a hand-crafted solution is clearly the better choice. Here’s an idea prompted by a recent visit to a site that makes use of materialized views and also happens to be licensed for the partitioning option.

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August 15, 2013

MV Refresh

Filed under: Bugs,CBO,Infrastructure,Materialized view,Oracle,Statistics — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:12 pm GMT Aug 15,2013

Here’s a funny little problem I came across some time ago when setting up some materialized views. I have two tables, orders and order_lines, and I’ve set up materialized view logs for them that allow a join materialized view (called orders_join) to be fast refreshable. Watch what happens if I refresh this view just before gathering stats on the order_lines table.

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April 29, 2013

MV Refresh

Filed under: Infrastructure,Materialized view,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 2:13 pm GMT Apr 29,2013

Materialized views open up all sorts of possibilities for making reporting more efficient – but at the same time they can introduce some “interesting” side effects when you start seeing refreshes taking place. (Possibly one of the most dramatic surprises appeared in the upgrade that switched many refreshes into “atomic” mode, changing a “truncate / append” cycle into a massively expensive “delete / insert” cycle).

If you want to have some ideas of the type of work that is involved in the materialized view “fast refresh”, you could look at some recent articles by Alberto Dell’Era on (very specifically) outer join materialized views (which a link back to a much older article on inner join materialized view refresh):

 

 

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