Oracle Scratchpad

November 27, 2018

Dump logfile

Filed under: Infrastructure,Oracle,redo — Jonathan Lewis @ 9:24 am GMT Nov 27,2018

Here’s a little procedure I’ve been using since Oracle 8i to dump the contents of the current log file – I’ve mentioned it several times in the past but never published it, so I’ll be checking for references to it and linking to it.

The code hasn’t changed in a long time, although I did add a query to get the full tracefile name from v$process when that became available. There’s also an (optional) called to dbms_support.my_sid to pick up the SID of the current session that slid into the code when that package became available.


rem
rem     Script:         c_dump_log.sql
rem     Author:         Jonathan Lewis
rem     Dated:          December 2002
rem     Purpose:        Create procedured to dump the current online redo log file.
rem
rem     Last tested
rem             18.3.0.0
rem             12.2.0.1
rem             11.1.0.7
rem             11.2.0.6
rem             10.2.0.5
rem             10.1.0.4
rem              9.2.0.8
rem              8.1.7.4
rem
rem     Notes:
rem     Must be run as a DBA
rem     Very simple minded - no error trapping
rem     

create or replace procedure dump_log
as
        m_log_name      varchar2(255);
        m_process       varchar2(255);
        m_trace_name    varchar2(255);

begin
        select 
                lf.member
        into
                m_log_name
        from
                V$log           lo,
                v$logfile       lf
        where 
                lo.status = 'CURRENT'
        and     lf.group# = lo.group#
        and     rownum = 1
        ;

        execute immediate
        'alter system dump logfile ''' || m_log_name || '''';

        select
                spid
        into
                m_process
        from
                v$session       se,
                v$process       pr
        where
                se.sid = --dbms_support.mysid
                        (select sid from v$mystat where rownum = 1)
        and     pr.addr = se.paddr
        ;

        select
                tracefile
        into
                m_trace_name
        from
                v$session       se,
                v$process       pr
        where
                se.sid = --dbms_support.mysid
                        (select sid from v$mystat where rownum = 1)
        and     pr.addr = se.paddr
        ;

        dbms_output.put_line('Trace file is: ' || m_trace_name);
        dbms_output.put_line('Log file name is: ' || m_log_name);
        dbms_output.put_line('Trace file name includes: ' || m_process);


end;
/

show errors

drop public synonym dump_log;
create public synonym dump_log for dump_log;
grant execute on dump_log to public;

I don’t use the package often but if I want to find out what redo is generated during a test I usually follow the sequence:

  • alter system switch logfile;
  • do the experiment
  • execute dump_log

If you’re running in a PDB there’s an extra step needed as you can’t “switch logfile” inside a PDB so I’ll either do a log file switch before I start the test or (if there are steps in the test script that could generate a lot of log file I don’t want to see) I include a “pause” in the test script and use another session to do the logfile switch – in both cases the second session has to be connected to the CDB.

You will have noticed the creation of the public synonym and granting of the execute privilege to public. In my own sandbox database that’s a convenience – you may want to be a little more protective in your development and test systems.

The “dump logfile” command has a number of options for selective dumping – I have a note in my file commenting on these options, but I haven’t checked if there are any new ones (or changes to existing ones) for a long time:


alter system dump logfile '{filename}'
        scn min {first SCN to dump}
        scn max {last SCN to dump}
        time min {seconds since midnight at the end of 1st Sept 1987}
        time max {see redo_time_calc.sql}
        layer {integer} opcode {integer} e.g.:
                layer 23        Block Written Records
                layer 5         Undo handling in general
                layer 5 opcode 4        Undo Seg header on commit; or rollback;
                layer 9999 opcode 9999  Trick to validate the whole log file structure
        xid {usn} {slot} {sequence}     -- 10g only, may break on IMU redo (see below)
        objno {object_id}               -- 10g only, may break on IMU redo (see below)
        dba min {datafile no} . {blockno} -- with spaces either side of the dot.
        dba max {datafile no} . {blockno} -- with spaces either side of the dot.
        rba min {log file seq no} . {blockno} -- with spaces either side of the dot.
        rba max {log file seq no} . {blockno} -- with spaces either side of the dot..
(The dots in the last four options becomes invalid syntax in 10g).

The introduction to this note references back to a presentation I did in the year 2000, but the closing comment suggests that I probably haven’t checked the list since some time in the 10g timeline.

The reference to redo_time_calc.sql points to the following script, that expresses the time as the number of seconds since Jan 1988, with the unfortunate simplification that Oracle thinks there are 31 days in every month of the year:


rem
rem     Script:         redo_time_calc3.sql
rem     Author:         Jonathan Lewis
rem     Dated:          Dec 2012
rem     Purpose:
rem

select 
        86400 * (
                31 *
                        months_between(
                                trunc(sysdate,'MM'),
                                to_date('01-Jan-1988','dd-mon-yyyy')
                        ) +
                sysdate - trunc(sysdate,'MM')
        )       redo_now
from 
        dual
;



select 
        86400 * (
                (sysdate - 10/1440) - trunc((sysdate-10/1440),'MM') + 
                31 * 
                        months_between(
                                trunc((sysdate - 10/1440),'MM'),
                                to_date('01-Jan-1988','dd-mon-yyyy')
                        )
                )               ten_minutes_ago,
        86400 * (
                sysdate - trunc(sysdate,'MM') + 
                31 * 
                        months_between(
                                trunc(sysdate,'MM'),
                                to_date('01-Jan-1988','dd-mon-yyyy')
                        )
                )               redo_now,
        to_char(sysdate,'mm/dd/yyyy hh24:mi:ss')        now
from 
        dual
;

This isn’t a piece of code I use much – the original version (which I published in Oracle Core, p.241) was something I wrote in 2003 and had to adjust by hand each time I used it without realising that I’d got it wrong. Luckily someone pointed out my error and gave me the corrected code a little while after I’d published the book. (It was one of those “why didn’t I think of that” moments – it seemed so obvious after he’d told me the right answer.)

November 13, 2018

Index Splits – 3

Filed under: Indexing,Infrastructure,Oracle,redo — Jonathan Lewis @ 8:06 pm GMT Nov 13,2018

This is stored only for reference, and in case anyone wants to wade through the details. It’s the redo log dump from the 90/10 index leaf block split test from the previous blog posts running on 11.2.0.4 on Linux. The first part is the full block dump, the second part is an extract of the Record and Change vector headings with the embedded opcode (opc:) for the undo records in the redo vectors, and a tiny note of what each change vector is doing.

Full dump


*** 2018-11-02 19:16:45.844
*** SESSION ID:(244.47) 2018-11-02 19:16:45.844
*** CLIENT ID:() 2018-11-02 19:16:45.844
*** SERVICE NAME:(SYS$USERS) 2018-11-02 19:16:45.844
*** MODULE NAME:(MyModule) 2018-11-02 19:16:45.844
*** ACTION NAME:(MyAction) 2018-11-02 19:16:45.844
 
----- begin tree dump
branch: 0x140008b 20971659 (0: nrow: 2, level: 1)
   leaf: 0x140008f 20971663 (-1: nrow: 147 rrow: 147)
   leaf: 0x140008c 20971660 (0: nrow: 145 rrow: 145)
----- end tree dump
----- begin tree dump
branch: 0x140008b 20971659 (0: nrow: 3, level: 1)
   leaf: 0x140008f 20971663 (-1: nrow: 147 rrow: 147)
   leaf: 0x140008c 20971660 (0: nrow: 145 rrow: 145)
   leaf: 0x140008d 20971661 (1: nrow: 1 rrow: 1)
----- end tree dump
Initial buffer sizes: read 1024K, overflow 832K, change 805K
 
DUMP OF REDO FROM FILE '/u01/app/oracle/oradata/TEST/onlinelog/o1_mf_2_bfjt3tsl_.log'
 Opcodes *.*
 RBAs: 0x000000.00000000.0000 thru 0xffffffff.ffffffff.ffff
 SCNs: scn: 0x0000.00000000 thru scn: 0xffff.ffffffff
 Times: creation thru eternity
 FILE HEADER:
        Compatibility Vsn = 186647552=0xb200400
        Db ID=2124268929=0x7e9dc581, Db Name='TEST'
        Activation ID=2124229505=0x7e9d2b81
        Control Seq=28320068=0x1b02144, File size=204800=0x32000
        File Number=2, Blksiz=512, File Type=2 LOG
 descrip:"Thread 0001, Seq# 0000012654, SCN 0x0b860d004016-0xffffffffffff"
 thread: 1 nab: 0xffffffff seq: 0x0000316e hws: 0x1 eot: 1 dis: 0
 resetlogs count: 0x313da101 scn: 0x0000.00000001 (1)
 prev resetlogs count: 0x0 scn: 0x0000.00000000
 Low  scn: 0x0b86.0d004016 (12670371643414) 11/02/2018 19:16:45
 Next scn: 0xffff.ffffffff 01/01/1988 00:00:00
 Enabled scn: 0x0000.00000001 (1) 09/14/2013 14:28:50
 Thread closed scn: 0x0b86.0d004016 (12670371643414) 11/02/2018 19:16:45
 Disk cksum: 0xfc42 Calc cksum: 0xfc42
 Terminal recovery stop scn: 0x0000.00000000
 Terminal recovery  01/01/1988 00:00:00
 Most recent redo scn: 0x0000.00000000
 Largest LWN: 0 blocks
 End-of-redo stream : No
 Unprotected mode
 Miscellaneous flags: 0x800000
 Thread internal enable indicator: thr: 0, seq: 0 scn: 0x0000.00000000
 Zero blocks: 0
 Format ID is 2
 redo log key is 16409c48687eb1bbc3e4a4d820a6f7e5
 redo log key flag is d
 Enabled redo threads: 1 
 
REDO RECORD - Thread:1 RBA: 0x00316e.00000002.0010 LEN: 0x0074 VLD: 0x05
SCN: 0x0b86.0d004016 SUBSCN:  1 11/02/2018 19:16:45
(LWN RBA: 0x00316e.00000002.0010 LEN: 0038 NST: 0001 SCN: 0x0b86.0d004016)
CHANGE #1 TYP:2 CLS:1 AFN:5 DBA:0x0140008c OBJ:350367 SCN:0x0b86.0d003f20 SEQ:2 OP:4.1 ENC:0 RBL:0
Block cleanout record, scn:  0x0b86.0d004016 ver: 0x01 opt: 0x02, entries follow...
  itli: 2  flg: 2  scn: 0x0b86.0d003f20
 
REDO RECORD - Thread:1 RBA: 0x00316e.00000002.0084 LEN: 0x0144 VLD: 0x01
SCN: 0x0b86.0d004016 SUBSCN:  2 11/02/2018 19:16:45
CHANGE #1 TYP:0 CLS:75 AFN:3 DBA:0x00c00170 OBJ:4294967295 SCN:0x0b86.0d003fe6 SEQ:1 OP:5.2 ENC:0 RBL:0
ktudh redo: slt: 0x000d sqn: 0x00009d48 flg: 0x0412 siz: 136 fbi: 0
            uba: 0x00c05593.2254.1d    pxid:  0x0000.000.00000000
CHANGE #2 TYP:0 CLS:76 AFN:3 DBA:0x00c05593 OBJ:4294967295 SCN:0x0b86.0d003fe5 SEQ:2 OP:5.1 ENC:0 RBL:0
ktudb redo: siz: 136 spc: 2818 flg: 0x0012 seq: 0x2254 rec: 0x1d
            xid:  0x001e.00d.00009d48  
ktubl redo: slt: 13 rci: 0 opc: 10.21 [objn: 350367 objd: 350367 tsn: 7]
Undo type:  Regular undo        Begin trans    Last buffer split:  No 
Temp Object:  No 
Tablespace Undo:  No 
             0x00000000  prev ctl uba: 0x00c05593.2254.1b 
prev ctl max cmt scn:  0x0b86.0d003da4  prev tx cmt scn:  0x0b86.0d003da5 
txn start scn:  0xffff.ffffffff  logon user: 62  prev brb: 0  prev bcl: 0 BuExt idx: 0 flg2: 0
index general undo (branch) operations
KTB Redo 
op: 0x04  ver: 0x01  
compat bit: 4 (post-11) padding: 1
op: L  itl: xid:  0x0019.01d.00009119 uba: 0x00c1702b.1ea1.02
                      flg: CB--    lkc:  0     scn: 0x0b86.0d003e8f
Dump kdige : block dba :0x0140008c, seghdr dba: 0x0140008a
unlock block
(1):  01
CHANGE #3 TYP:0 CLS:1 AFN:5 DBA:0x0140008c OBJ:350367 SCN:0x0b86.0d004016 SEQ:1 OP:10.6 ENC:0 RBL:0
index redo (kdxlok):  lock block, count=2
KTB Redo 
op: 0x01  ver: 0x01  
compat bit: 4 (post-11) padding: 1
op: F  xid:  0x001e.00d.00009d48    uba: 0x00c05593.2254.1d
lock itl 1
operation = 0x5, pre-split
 
REDO RECORD - Thread:1 RBA: 0x00316e.00000002.01c8 LEN: 0x20a4 VLD: 0x01
SCN: 0x0b86.0d004016 SUBSCN:  3 11/02/2018 19:16:45
CHANGE #1 TYP:0 CLS:75 AFN:3 DBA:0x00c00170 OBJ:4294967295 SCN:0x0b86.0d004016 SEQ:1 OP:5.2 ENC:0 RBL:0
ktudh redo: slt: 0x000d sqn: 0x00000000 flg: 0x000a siz: 8148 fbi: 255
            uba: 0x00c05595.2254.01    pxid:  0x0000.000.00000000
CHANGE #2 TYP:1 CLS:76 AFN:3 DBA:0x00c05595 OBJ:4294967295 SCN:0x0b86.0d004016 SEQ:1 OP:5.1 ENC:0 RBL:0
ktudb redo: siz: 8148 spc: 2680 flg: 0x000a seq: 0x2254 rec: 0x01
            xid:  0x001e.00d.00009d48  
ktubu redo: slt: 13 rci: 0 opc: 10.21 objn: 350367 objd: 350367 tsn: 7
Undo type:  Regular undo       Undo type:  Last buffer split:  No 
Tablespace Undo:  No 
             0x00c05593
index general undo (branch) operations
KTB Redo 
op: 0x05  ver: 0x01  
compat bit: 4 (post-11) padding: 1
op: R  itc: 2
 Itl           Xid                  Uba         Flag  Lck        Scn/Fsc
0x01   0x001e.00d.00009d48  0x00c05593.2254.1d  ----    1  fsc 0x0000.00000000
0x02   0x001d.012.0000a9d7  0x00c04b88.256f.10  C---    0  scn 0x0b86.0d003f20
Dump kdige : block dba :0x0140008c, seghdr dba: 0x0140008a
restore block before image
(8032): 
 00 01 85 02 01 00 00 00 91 00 46 01 5c 01 16 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 8f
 00 40 01 06 00 00 00 60 1f 00 00 2b 1f f6 1e c1 1e 8c 1e 57 1e 22 1e ed 1d
 b8 1d 83 1d 4e 1d 19 1d e4 1c af 1c 7a 1c 45 1c 10 1c db 1b a6 1b 71 1b 3c
 1b 07 1b d2 1a 9d 1a 68 1a 33 1a fe 19 c9 19 94 19 5f 19 2a 19 f5 18 c0 18
 8b 18 56 18 21 18 ec 17 b7 17 82 17 4d 17 18 17 e3 16 ae 16 79 16 44 16 0f
 16 da 15 a5 15 70 15 3b 15 06 15 d1 14 9c 14 68 14 33 14 fe 13 c9 13 94 13
 5f 13 2a 13 f5 12 c0 12 8b 12 56 12 21 12 ec 11 b7 11 82 11 4d 11 18 11 e3
 10 ae 10 79 10 44 10 0f 10 da 0f a5 0f 70 0f 3b 0f 06 0f d1 0e 9c 0e 67 0e
 32 0e fd 0d c8 0d 93 0d 5e 0d 29 0d f4 0c bf 0c 8a 0c 55 0c 20 0c eb 0b b6
 0b 81 0b 4c 0b 17 0b e2 0a ad 0a 78 0a 43 0a 0e 0a d9 09 a4 09 6f 09 3a 09
 05 09 d0 08 9b 08 66 08 31 08 fc 07 c7 07 92 07 5d 07 28 07 f3 06 be 06 89
 06 54 06 1f 06 ea 05 b5 05 80 05 4b 05 16 05 e1 04 ac 04 77 04 42 04 0d 04
 d8 03 a3 03 6e 03 39 03 04 03 cf 02 9a 02 65 02 30 02 fb 01 c6 01 91 01 5c
 01 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
 01 40 00 85 00 05 03 c2 03 5d 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 00 00 01 40 00 85 00 04 03 c2 03 5c 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 85 00 03 03 c2 03 5b 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 85 00 02 03 c2 03 5a 28 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 85 00 01 03 c2 03 59 28 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 85 00 00 03 c2 03 58
 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 46 03
 c2 03 57 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86
 00 45 03 c2 03 56 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01
 40 00 86 00 44 03 c2 03 55 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 43 03 c2 03 54 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 42 03 c2 03 53 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 41 03 c2 03 52 28 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 40 03 c2 03 51 28 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 3f 03 c2 03 50 28
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 3e 03 c2
 03 4f 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00
 3d 03 c2 03 4e 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40
 00 86 00 3c 03 c2 03 4d 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00
 00 01 40 00 86 00 3b 03 c2 03 4c 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 3a 03 c2 03 4b 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 39 03 c2 03 4a 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 38 03 c2 03 49 28 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 37 03 c2 03 48 28 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 36 03 c2 03
 47 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 35
 03 c2 03 46 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00
 86 00 34 03 c2 03 45 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00
 01 40 00 86 00 33 03 c2 03 44 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 32 03 c2 03 43 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 31 03 c2 03 42 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 30 03 c2 03 41 28 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 2f 03 c2 03 40 28 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 2e 03 c2 03 3f
 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 2d 03
 c2 03 3e 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86
 00 2c 03 c2 03 3d 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01
 40 00 86 00 2b 03 c2 03 3c 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 2a 03 c2 03 3b 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 29 03 c2 03 3a 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 28 03 c2 03 39 28 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 27 03 c2 03 38 28 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 26 03 c2 03 37 28
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 25 03 c2
 03 36 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00
 24 03 c2 03 35 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40
 00 86 00 23 03 c2 03 34 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00
 00 01 40 00 86 00 22 03 c2 03 33 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 21 03 c2 03 32 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 20 03 c2 03 31 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 1f 03 c2 03 30 28 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 1e 03 c2 03 2f 28 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 1d 03 c2 03
 2e 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 1c
 03 c2 03 2d 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00
 86 00 1b 03 c2 03 2c 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00
 01 40 00 86 00 1a 03 c2 03 2b 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 19 03 c2 03 2a 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 18 03 c2 03 29 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 17 03 c2 03 28 28 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 16 03 c2 03 27 28 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 15 03 c2 03 26
 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 14 03
 c2 03 25 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86
 00 13 03 c2 03 24 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01
 40 00 86 00 12 03 c2 03 23 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 11 03 c2 03 22 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 10 03 c2 03 21 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 0f 03 c2 03 20 28 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 0e 03 c2 03 1f 28 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 0d 03 c2 03 1e 28
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 0c 03 c2
 03 1d 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00
 0b 03 c2 03 1c 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40
 00 86 00 0a 03 c2 03 1b 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00
 00 01 40 00 86 00 09 03 c2 03 1a 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 08 03 c2 03 19 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 07 03 c2 03 18 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 06 03 c2 03 17 28 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 05 03 c2 03 16 28 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 04 03 c2 03
 15 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 03
 03 c2 03 14 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00
 86 00 02 03 c2 03 13 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00
 01 40 00 86 00 01 03 c2 03 12 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 00 00 01 40 00 86 00 00 03 c2 03 11 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 46 03 c2 03 10 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 45 03 c2 03 0f 28 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 44 03 c2 03 0e 28 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 43 03 c2 03 0d
 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 42 03
 c2 03 0c 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84
 00 41 03 c2 03 0b 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01
 40 00 84 00 40 03 c2 03 0a 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 3f 03 c2 03 09 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 3e 03 c2 03 08 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 3d 03 c2 03 07 28 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 3c 03 c2 03 06 28 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 3b 03 c2 03 05 28
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 3a 03 c2
 03 04 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00
 39 03 c2 03 03 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40
 00 84 00 38 03 c2 03 02 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00
 00 01 40 00 84 00 37 02 c2 03 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 36 03 c2 02 64 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 35 03 c2 02 63 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 34 03 c2 02 62 28 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 33 03 c2 02 61 28 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 32 03 c2 02 60
 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 31 03
 c2 02 5f 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84
 00 30 03 c2 02 5e 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01
 40 00 84 00 2f 03 c2 02 5d 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 2e 03 c2 02 5c 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 2d 03 c2 02 5b 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 2c 03 c2 02 5a 28 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 2b 03 c2 02 59 28 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 2a 03 c2 02 58 28
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 29 03 c2
 02 57 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00
 28 03 c2 02 56 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40
 00 84 00 27 03 c2 02 55 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00
 00 01 40 00 84 00 26 03 c2 02 54 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 25 03 c2 02 53 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 24 03 c2 02 52 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 23 03 c2 02 51 28 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 22 03 c2 02 50 28 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 21 03 c2 02
 4f 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 20
 03 c2 02 4e 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00
 84 00 1f 03 c2 02 4d 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00
 01 40 00 84 00 1e 03 c2 02 4c 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 1d 03 c2 02 4b 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 1c 03 c2 02 4a 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 1b 03 c2 02 49 28 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 1a 03 c2 02 48 28 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 19 03 c2 02 47
 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 18 03
 c2 02 46 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84
 00 17 03 c2 02 45 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01
 40 00 84 00 16 03 c2 02 44 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 15 03 c2 02 43 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 14 03 c2 02 42 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 13 03 c2 02 41 28 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 12 03 c2 02 40 28 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 11 03 c2 02 3f 28
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 10 03 c2
 02 3e 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00
 0f 03 c2 02 3d 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40
 00 84 00 0e 03 c2 02 3c 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00
 00 01 40 00 84 00 0d 03 c2 02 3b 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 0c 03 c2 02 3a 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 0b 03 c2 02 39 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 0a 03 c2 02 38 28 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 09 03 c2 02 37 28 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 08 03 c2 02
 36 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 07
 03 c2 02 35 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00
 84 00 06 03 c2 02 34 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 00 00
 01 40 00 84 00 05 03 c2 02 33 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 04 03 c2 02 32 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 00 00 01 40 00 84 00 03 03 c2 02 31 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
CHANGE #3 TYP:0 CLS:1 AFN:5 DBA:0x0140008c OBJ:350367 SCN:0x0b86.0d004016 SEQ:2 OP:10.9 ENC:0 RBL:0
index redo (kdxair): apply xat do to itl 1 (count=2)
KTB Redo 
op: 0x05  ver: 0x01  
compat bit: 4 (post-11) padding: 1
op: R  itc: 1
 Itl           Xid                  Uba         Flag  Lck        Scn/Fsc
0x01   0x001e.00d.00009d48  0x00c05595.2254.01  -B--    1  fsc 0x0000.00000000
 
REDO RECORD - Thread:1 RBA: 0x00316e.00000013.017c LEN: 0x0044 VLD: 0x01
SCN: 0x0b86.0d004016 SUBSCN:  3 11/02/2018 19:16:45
CHANGE #1 TYP:0 CLS:8 AFN:5 DBA:0x01400088 OBJ:350367 SCN:0x0b86.0d003e8e SEQ:3 OP:13.22 ENC:0 RBL:0
Redo on Level1 Bitmap Block
Redo for state change
Len: 1 Offset: 4 newstate: 140243567116289
 
REDO RECORD - Thread:1 RBA: 0x00316e.00000013.01c0 LEN: 0x01ac VLD: 0x01
SCN: 0x0b86.0d004016 SUBSCN:  4 11/02/2018 19:16:45
CHANGE #1 TYP:0 CLS:75 AFN:3 DBA:0x00c00170 OBJ:4294967295 SCN:0x0b86.0d004016 SEQ:2 OP:5.2 ENC:0 RBL:0
ktudh redo: slt: 0x000d sqn: 0x00000000 flg: 0x000a siz: 120 fbi: 0
            uba: 0x00c05596.2254.01    pxid:  0x0000.000.00000000
CHANGE #2 TYP:1 CLS:76 AFN:3 DBA:0x00c05596 OBJ:4294967295 SCN:0x0b86.0d004016 SEQ:1 OP:5.1 ENC:0 RBL:0
ktudb redo: siz: 120 spc: 0 flg: 0x000a seq: 0x2254 rec: 0x01
            xid:  0x001e.00d.00009d48  
ktubu redo: slt: 13 rci: 0 opc: 10.21 objn: 350367 objd: 350367 tsn: 7
Undo type:  Regular undo       Undo type:  Last buffer split:  No 
Tablespace Undo:  No 
             0x00c05595
index general undo (branch) operations
KTB Redo 
op: 0x05  ver: 0x01  
compat bit: 4 (post-11) padding: 1
op: R  itc: 2
 Itl           Xid                  Uba         Flag  Lck        Scn/Fsc
0x01   0x0000.000.00000000  0x00000000.0000.00  ----    0  fsc 0x0000.00000000
0x02   0x0000.000.00000000  0x00000000.0000.00  ----    0  fsc 0x0000.00000000
Dump kdige : block dba :0x0140008d, seghdr dba: 0x0140008a
make leaf block empty
(2):  01 00
CHANGE #3 TYP:0 CLS:1 AFN:5 DBA:0x0140008d OBJ:350367 SCN:0x0b86.0d003e8e SEQ:2 OP:10.8 ENC:0 RBL:0
index redo (kdxlne): (count=4) init header of newly allocated leaf block
KTB Redo 
op: 0x05  ver: 0x01  
compat bit: 4 (post-11) padding: 1
op: R  itc: 2
 Itl           Xid                  Uba         Flag  Lck        Scn/Fsc
0x01   0x001e.00d.00009d48  0x00c05596.2254.01  -B--    0  fsc 0x0000.00000000
0x02   0x0000.000.00000000  0x00000000.0000.00  ----    0  fsc 0x0000.00000000
kdxlnitl = 1
kdxlnnco = 2
kdxlndsz = 6
kdxlncol = 246
kdxlnflg = 0
kdxlnnxt = 0x0
kdxlnprv = 0x140008c
new block has 1 rows
dumping row index
Dump of memory from 0x00007F8D3FC10078 to 0x00007F8D3FC1007C
7F8D3FC10070                   1F5D1F26                   [&.].]    
dumping rows
Dump of memory from 0x00007F8D3FC1007C to 0x00007F8D3FC100B1
7F8D3FC10070                            40010101              [...@]
7F8D3FC10080 06008500 5E03C203 78787828 78787878  [.......^(xxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10090 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC100B0 30303078                             [x000]            
 
REDO RECORD - Thread:1 RBA: 0x00316e.00000014.017c LEN: 0x0048 VLD: 0x01
SCN: 0x0b86.0d004016 SUBSCN:  4 11/02/2018 19:16:45
CHANGE #1 TYP:2 CLS:1 AFN:5 DBA:0x0140008b OBJ:350367 SCN:0x0b86.0d003e8f SEQ:2 OP:4.1 ENC:0 RBL:0
Block cleanout record, scn:  0x0b86.0d004016 ver: 0x01 opt: 0x02, entries follow...
  itli: 1  flg: 2  scn: 0x0b86.0d003e8f
 
REDO RECORD - Thread:1 RBA: 0x00316e.00000014.01c4 LEN: 0x00e0 VLD: 0x01
SCN: 0x0b86.0d004016 SUBSCN:  5 11/02/2018 19:16:45
CHANGE #1 TYP:0 CLS:76 AFN:3 DBA:0x00c05596 OBJ:4294967295 SCN:0x0b86.0d004016 SEQ:2 OP:5.1 ENC:0 RBL:0
ktudb redo: siz: 84 spc: 8028 flg: 0x0022 seq: 0x2254 rec: 0x02
            xid:  0x001e.00d.00009d48  
ktubu redo: slt: 13 rci: 1 opc: 10.21 objn: 350367 objd: 350367 tsn: 7
Undo type:  Regular undo       Undo type:  Last buffer split:  No 
Tablespace Undo:  No 
             0x00000000
index general undo (branch) operations
KTB Redo 
op: 0x04  ver: 0x01  
compat bit: 4 (post-11) padding: 1
op: L  itl: xid:  0x0019.01d.00009119 uba: 0x00c17029.1ea1.01
                      flg: CB--    lkc:  0     scn: 0x0b86.0d003e8f
Dump kdige : block dba :0x0140008b, seghdr dba: 0x0140008a
branch block row purge
(4):  01 00 01 00
CHANGE #2 TYP:0 CLS:1 AFN:5 DBA:0x0140008b OBJ:350367 SCN:0x0b86.0d004016 SEQ:1 OP:10.15 ENC:0 RBL:0
index redo (kdxbin) :  insert branch block row, count=3
KTB Redo 
op: 0x01  ver: 0x01  
compat bit: 4 (post-11) padding: 1
op: F  xid:  0x001e.00d.00009d48    uba: 0x00c05596.2254.02
REDO itl: 1 insert into slot 1, child dba 0x140008d
new key : (5):  03 c2 03 5e fe
 
REDO RECORD - Thread:1 RBA: 0x00316e.00000015.00b4 LEN: 0x1fb0 VLD: 0x01
SCN: 0x0b86.0d004017 SUBSCN:  1 11/02/2018 19:16:45
CHANGE #1 TYP:0 CLS:75 AFN:3 DBA:0x00c00170 OBJ:4294967295 SCN:0x0b86.0d004016 SEQ:3 OP:5.4 ENC:0 RBL:0
ktucm redo: slt: 0x000d sqn: 0x00009d48 srt: 0 sta: 9 flg: 0x2 ktucf redo: uba: 0x00c05596.2254.02 ext: 14 spc: 7942 fbi: 0 
CHANGE #2 TYP:0 CLS:1 AFN:5 DBA:0x0140008c OBJ:350367 SCN:0x0b86.0d004016 SEQ:3 OP:10.8 ENC:0 RBL:0
index redo (kdxlne): (count=4) init leaf block being split
zeroed lock count and free space, kdxlenxt = 0x140008d
new block has 145 rows
dumping row index
Dump of memory from 0x00007F8D3FC10028 to 0x00007F8D3FC1014C
7F8D3FC10020                   00370000 00A5006E          [..7.n...]
7F8D3FC10030 011300DC 0181014A 01EF01B8 025D0226  [....J.......&.].]
7F8D3FC10040 02CB0294 03390302 03A70370 041503DE  [......9.p.......]
7F8D3FC10050 0483044C 04F104BA 055F0528 05CD0596  [L.......(._.....]
7F8D3FC10060 063B0604 06A90672 071706E0 0785074E  [..;.r.......N...]
7F8D3FC10070 07F307BC 0861082A 08CF0898 093D0906  [....*.a.......=.]
7F8D3FC10080 09AB0974 0A1909E2 0A870A50 0AF50ABE  [t.......P.......]
7F8D3FC10090 0B620B2C 0BD00B99 0C3E0C07 0CAC0C75  [,.b.......>.u...]
7F8D3FC100A0 0D1A0CE3 0D880D51 0DF60DBF 0E640E2D  [....Q.......-.d.]
7F8D3FC100B0 0ED20E9B 0F400F09 0FAE0F77 101C0FE5  [......@.w.......]
7F8D3FC100C0 108A1053 10F810C1 1166112F 11D4119D  [S......./.f.....]
7F8D3FC100D0 1242120B 12B01279 131E12E7 138C1355  [..B.y.......U...]
7F8D3FC100E0 13FA13C3 14681431 14D6149F 1544150D  [....1.h.......D.]
7F8D3FC100F0 15B2157B 162015E9 168E1657 16FC16C5  [{..... .W.......]
7F8D3FC10100 176A1733 17D817A1 1846180F 18B4187D  [3.j.......F.}...]
7F8D3FC10110 192218EB 19901959 19FE19C7 1A6C1A35  [..".Y.......5.l.]
7F8D3FC10120 1ADA1AA3 1B481B11 1BB61B7F 1C241BED  [......H.......$.]
7F8D3FC10130 1C921C5B 1D001CC9 1D6E1D37 1DDC1DA5  [[.......7.n.....]
7F8D3FC10140 1E4A1E13 1EB81E81 1F261EEF           [..J.......&.]    
dumping rows
Dump of memory from 0x00007F8D3FC1014C to 0x00007F8D3FC11F50
7F8D3FC10140                            40010000              [...@]
7F8D3FC10150 03008400 3102C203 78787828 78787878  [.......1(xxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10160 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC10180 01000078 00840040 02C20304 78782832  [x...@.......2(xx]
7F8D3FC10190 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC101B0 78787878 00007878 84004001 C2030500  [xxxxxx...@......]
7F8D3FC101C0 78283302 78787878 78787878 78787878  [.3(xxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC101D0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC101E0 78787878 78787878 00787878 00400100  [xxxxxxxxxxx...@.]
7F8D3FC101F0 03060084 283402C2 78787878 78787878  [......4(xxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10200 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC10220 40010000 07008400 3502C203 78787828  [...@.......5(xxx]
7F8D3FC10230 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC10250 78787878 01000078 00840040 02C20308  [xxxxx...@.......]
7F8D3FC10260 78782836 78787878 78787878 78787878  [6(xxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10270 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10280 78787878 78787878 00007878 84004001  [xxxxxxxxxx...@..]
7F8D3FC10290 C2030900 78283702 78787878 78787878  [.....7(xxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC102A0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC102B0 78787878 78787878 78787878 00787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.]
7F8D3FC102C0 00400100 030A0084 283802C2 78787878  [..@.......8(xxxx]
7F8D3FC102D0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC102F0 78787878 40010000 0B008400 3902C203  [xxxx...@.......9]
7F8D3FC10300 78787828 78787878 78787878 78787878  [(xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10310 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10320 78787878 78787878 01000078 00840040  [xxxxxxxxx...@...]
7F8D3FC10330 02C2030C 7878283A 78787878 78787878  [....:(xxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10340 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10350 78787878 78787878 78787878 00007878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxx..]
7F8D3FC10360 84004001 C2030D00 78283B02 78787878  [.@.......;(xxxxx]
7F8D3FC10370 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC10390 00787878 00400100 030E0084 283C02C2  [xxx...@.......<(]
7F8D3FC103A0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC103C0 78787878 78787878 40010000 0F008400  [xxxxxxxx...@....]
7F8D3FC103D0 3D02C203 78787828 78787878 78787878  [...=(xxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC103E0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC103F0 78787878 78787878 78787878 01000078  [xxxxxxxxxxxxx...]
7F8D3FC10400 00840040 02C20310 7878283E 78787878  [@.......>(xxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10410 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC10430 00007878 84004001 C2031100 78283F02  [xx...@.......?(x]
7F8D3FC10440 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC10460 78787878 00787878 00400100 03120084  [xxxxxxx...@.....]
7F8D3FC10470 284002C2 78787878 78787878 78787878  [..@(xxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10480 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10490 78787878 78787878 78787878 40010000  [xxxxxxxxxxxx...@]
7F8D3FC104A0 13008400 4102C203 78787828 78787878  [.......A(xxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC104B0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC104D0 01000078 00840040 02C20314 78782842  [x...@.......B(xx]
7F8D3FC104E0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC10500 78787878 00007878 84004001 C2031500  [xxxxxx...@......]
7F8D3FC10510 78284302 78787878 78787878 78787878  [.C(xxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10520 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10530 78787878 78787878 00787878 00400100  [xxxxxxxxxxx...@.]
7F8D3FC10540 03160084 284402C2 78787878 78787878  [......D(xxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10550 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC10570 40010000 17008400 4502C203 78787828  [...@.......E(xxx]
7F8D3FC10580 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC105A0 78787878 01000078 00840040 02C20318  [xxxxx...@.......]
7F8D3FC105B0 78782846 78787878 78787878 78787878  [F(xxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC105C0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC105D0 78787878 78787878 00007878 84004001  [xxxxxxxxxx...@..]
7F8D3FC105E0 C2031900 78284702 78787878 78787878  [.....G(xxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC105F0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10600 78787878 78787878 78787878 00787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.]
7F8D3FC10610 00400100 031A0084 284802C2 78787878  [..@.......H(xxxx]
7F8D3FC10620 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC10640 78787878 40010000 1B008400 4902C203  [xxxx...@.......I]
7F8D3FC10650 78787828 78787878 78787878 78787878  [(xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10660 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10670 78787878 78787878 01000078 00840040  [xxxxxxxxx...@...]
7F8D3FC10680 02C2031C 7878284A 78787878 78787878  [....J(xxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10690 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC106A0 78787878 78787878 78787878 00007878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxx..]
7F8D3FC106B0 84004001 C2031D00 78284B02 78787878  [.@.......K(xxxxx]
7F8D3FC106C0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC106E0 00787878 00400100 031E0084 284C02C2  [xxx...@.......L(]
7F8D3FC106F0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC10710 78787878 78787878 40010000 1F008400  [xxxxxxxx...@....]
7F8D3FC10720 4D02C203 78787828 78787878 78787878  [...M(xxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10730 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10740 78787878 78787878 78787878 01000078  [xxxxxxxxxxxxx...]
7F8D3FC10750 00840040 02C20320 7878284E 78787878  [@... ...N(xxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10760 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC10780 00007878 84004001 C2032100 78284F02  [xx...@...!...O(x]
7F8D3FC10790 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC107B0 78787878 00787878 00400100 03220084  [xxxxxxx...@...".]
7F8D3FC107C0 285002C2 78787878 78787878 78787878  [..P(xxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC107D0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC107E0 78787878 78787878 78787878 40010000  [xxxxxxxxxxxx...@]
7F8D3FC107F0 23008400 5102C203 78787828 78787878  [...#...Q(xxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10800 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC10820 01000078 00840040 02C20324 78782852  [x...@...$...R(xx]
7F8D3FC10830 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC10850 78787878 00007878 84004001 C2032500  [xxxxxx...@...%..]
7F8D3FC10860 78285302 78787878 78787878 78787878  [.S(xxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10870 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10880 78787878 78787878 00787878 00400100  [xxxxxxxxxxx...@.]
7F8D3FC10890 03260084 285402C2 78787878 78787878  [..&...T(xxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC108A0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC108C0 40010000 27008400 5502C203 78787828  [...@...'...U(xxx]
7F8D3FC108D0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC108F0 78787878 01000078 00840040 02C20328  [xxxxx...@...(...]
7F8D3FC10900 78782856 78787878 78787878 78787878  [V(xxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10910 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10920 78787878 78787878 00007878 84004001  [xxxxxxxxxx...@..]
7F8D3FC10930 C2032900 78285702 78787878 78787878  [.)...W(xxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10940 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10950 78787878 78787878 78787878 00787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.]
7F8D3FC10960 00400100 032A0084 285802C2 78787878  [..@...*...X(xxxx]
7F8D3FC10970 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC10990 78787878 40010000 2B008400 5902C203  [xxxx...@...+...Y]
7F8D3FC109A0 78787828 78787878 78787878 78787878  [(xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC109B0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC109C0 78787878 78787878 01000078 00840040  [xxxxxxxxx...@...]
7F8D3FC109D0 02C2032C 7878285A 78787878 78787878  [,...Z(xxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC109E0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC109F0 78787878 78787878 78787878 00007878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxx..]
7F8D3FC10A00 84004001 C2032D00 78285B02 78787878  [.@...-...[(xxxxx]
7F8D3FC10A10 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC10A30 00787878 00400100 032E0084 285C02C2  [xxx...@.......\(]
7F8D3FC10A40 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC10A60 78787878 78787878 40010000 2F008400  [xxxxxxxx...@.../]
7F8D3FC10A70 5D02C203 78787828 78787878 78787878  [...](xxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10A80 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10A90 78787878 78787878 78787878 01000078  [xxxxxxxxxxxxx...]
7F8D3FC10AA0 00840040 02C20330 7878285E 78787878  [@...0...^(xxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10AB0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC10AD0 00007878 84004001 C2033100 78285F02  [xx...@...1..._(x]
7F8D3FC10AE0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC10B00 78787878 00787878 00400100 03320084  [xxxxxxx...@...2.]
7F8D3FC10B10 286002C2 78787878 78787878 78787878  [..`(xxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10B20 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10B30 78787878 78787878 78787878 40010000  [xxxxxxxxxxxx...@]
7F8D3FC10B40 33008400 6102C203 78787828 78787878  [...3...a(xxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10B50 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC10B70 01000078 00840040 02C20334 78782862  [x...@...4...b(xx]
7F8D3FC10B80 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC10BA0 78787878 00007878 84004001 C2033500  [xxxxxx...@...5..]
7F8D3FC10BB0 78286302 78787878 78787878 78787878  [.c(xxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10BC0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10BD0 78787878 78787878 00787878 00400100  [xxxxxxxxxxx...@.]
7F8D3FC10BE0 03360084 286402C2 78787878 78787878  [..6...d(xxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10BF0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC10C10 40010000 37008400 2803C202 78787878  [...@...7...(xxxx]
7F8D3FC10C20 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC10C40 78787878 40010000 38008400 0203C203  [xxxx...@...8....]
7F8D3FC10C50 78787828 78787878 78787878 78787878  [(xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10C60 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10C70 78787878 78787878 01000078 00840040  [xxxxxxxxx...@...]
7F8D3FC10C80 03C20339 78782803 78787878 78787878  [9....(xxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10C90 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10CA0 78787878 78787878 78787878 00007878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxx..]
7F8D3FC10CB0 84004001 C2033A00 78280403 78787878  [.@...:....(xxxxx]
7F8D3FC10CC0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC10CE0 00787878 00400100 033B0084 280503C2  [xxx...@...;....(]
7F8D3FC10CF0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC10D10 78787878 78787878 40010000 3C008400  [xxxxxxxx...@...<]
7F8D3FC10D20 0603C203 78787828 78787878 78787878  [....(xxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10D30 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10D40 78787878 78787878 78787878 01000078  [xxxxxxxxxxxxx...]
7F8D3FC10D50 00840040 03C2033D 78782807 78787878  [@...=....(xxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10D60 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC10D80 00007878 84004001 C2033E00 78280803  [xx...@...>....(x]
7F8D3FC10D90 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC10DB0 78787878 00787878 00400100 033F0084  [xxxxxxx...@...?.]
7F8D3FC10DC0 280903C2 78787878 78787878 78787878  [...(xxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10DD0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10DE0 78787878 78787878 78787878 40010000  [xxxxxxxxxxxx...@]
7F8D3FC10DF0 40008400 0A03C203 78787828 78787878  [...@....(xxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10E00 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC10E20 01000078 00840040 03C20341 7878280B  [x...@...A....(xx]
7F8D3FC10E30 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC10E50 78787878 00007878 84004001 C2034200  [xxxxxx...@...B..]
7F8D3FC10E60 78280C03 78787878 78787878 78787878  [..(xxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10E70 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10E80 78787878 78787878 00787878 00400100  [xxxxxxxxxxx...@.]
7F8D3FC10E90 03430084 280D03C2 78787878 78787878  [..C....(xxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10EA0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC10EC0 40010000 44008400 0E03C203 78787828  [...@...D....(xxx]
7F8D3FC10ED0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC10EF0 78787878 01000078 00840040 03C20345  [xxxxx...@...E...]
7F8D3FC10F00 7878280F 78787878 78787878 78787878  [.(xxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10F10 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10F20 78787878 78787878 00007878 84004001  [xxxxxxxxxx...@..]
7F8D3FC10F30 C2034600 78281003 78787878 78787878  [.F....(xxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10F40 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10F50 78787878 78787878 78787878 00787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.]
7F8D3FC10F60 00400100 03000086 281103C2 78787878  [..@........(xxxx]
7F8D3FC10F70 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC10F90 78787878 40010000 01008600 1203C203  [xxxx...@........]
7F8D3FC10FA0 78787828 78787878 78787878 78787878  [(xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10FB0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10FC0 78787878 78787878 01000078 00860040  [xxxxxxxxx...@...]
7F8D3FC10FD0 03C20302 78782813 78787878 78787878  [.....(xxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10FE0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC10FF0 78787878 78787878 78787878 00007878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxx..]
7F8D3FC11000 86004001 C2030300 78281403 78787878  [.@........(xxxxx]
7F8D3FC11010 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC11030 00787878 00400100 03040086 281503C2  [xxx...@........(]
7F8D3FC11040 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC11060 78787878 78787878 40010000 05008600  [xxxxxxxx...@....]
7F8D3FC11070 1603C203 78787828 78787878 78787878  [....(xxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11080 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11090 78787878 78787878 78787878 01000078  [xxxxxxxxxxxxx...]
7F8D3FC110A0 00860040 03C20306 78782817 78787878  [@........(xxxxxx]
7F8D3FC110B0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC110D0 00007878 86004001 C2030700 78281803  [xx...@........(x]
7F8D3FC110E0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC11100 78787878 00787878 00400100 03080086  [xxxxxxx...@.....]
7F8D3FC11110 281903C2 78787878 78787878 78787878  [...(xxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11120 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11130 78787878 78787878 78787878 40010000  [xxxxxxxxxxxx...@]
7F8D3FC11140 09008600 1A03C203 78787828 78787878  [........(xxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11150 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC11170 01000078 00860040 03C2030A 7878281B  [x...@........(xx]
7F8D3FC11180 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC111A0 78787878 00007878 86004001 C2030B00  [xxxxxx...@......]
7F8D3FC111B0 78281C03 78787878 78787878 78787878  [..(xxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC111C0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC111D0 78787878 78787878 00787878 00400100  [xxxxxxxxxxx...@.]
7F8D3FC111E0 030C0086 281D03C2 78787878 78787878  [.......(xxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC111F0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC11210 40010000 0D008600 1E03C203 78787828  [...@........(xxx]
7F8D3FC11220 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC11240 78787878 01000078 00860040 03C2030E  [xxxxx...@.......]
7F8D3FC11250 7878281F 78787878 78787878 78787878  [.(xxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11260 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11270 78787878 78787878 00007878 86004001  [xxxxxxxxxx...@..]
7F8D3FC11280 C2030F00 78282003 78787878 78787878  [..... (xxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11290 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC112A0 78787878 78787878 78787878 00787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.]
7F8D3FC112B0 00400100 03100086 282103C2 78787878  [..@.......!(xxxx]
7F8D3FC112C0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC112E0 78787878 40010000 11008600 2203C203  [xxxx...@......."]
7F8D3FC112F0 78787828 78787878 78787878 78787878  [(xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11300 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11310 78787878 78787878 01000078 00860040  [xxxxxxxxx...@...]
7F8D3FC11320 03C20312 78782823 78787878 78787878  [....#(xxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11330 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11340 78787878 78787878 78787878 00007878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxx..]
7F8D3FC11350 86004001 C2031300 78282403 78787878  [.@.......$(xxxxx]
7F8D3FC11360 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC11380 00787878 00400100 03140086 282503C2  [xxx...@.......%(]
7F8D3FC11390 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC113B0 78787878 78787878 40010000 15008600  [xxxxxxxx...@....]
7F8D3FC113C0 2603C203 78787828 78787878 78787878  [...&(xxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC113D0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC113E0 78787878 78787878 78787878 01000078  [xxxxxxxxxxxxx...]
7F8D3FC113F0 00860040 03C20316 78782827 78787878  [@.......'(xxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11400 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC11420 00007878 86004001 C2031700 78282803  [xx...@.......((x]
7F8D3FC11430 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC11450 78787878 00787878 00400100 03180086  [xxxxxxx...@.....]
7F8D3FC11460 282903C2 78787878 78787878 78787878  [..)(xxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11470 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11480 78787878 78787878 78787878 40010000  [xxxxxxxxxxxx...@]
7F8D3FC11490 19008600 2A03C203 78787828 78787878  [.......*(xxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC114A0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC114C0 01000078 00860040 03C2031A 7878282B  [x...@.......+(xx]
7F8D3FC114D0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC114F0 78787878 00007878 86004001 C2031B00  [xxxxxx...@......]
7F8D3FC11500 78282C03 78787878 78787878 78787878  [.,(xxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11510 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11520 78787878 78787878 00787878 00400100  [xxxxxxxxxxx...@.]
7F8D3FC11530 031C0086 282D03C2 78787878 78787878  [......-(xxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11540 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC11560 40010000 1D008600 2E03C203 78787828  [...@........(xxx]
7F8D3FC11570 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC11590 78787878 01000078 00860040 03C2031E  [xxxxx...@.......]
7F8D3FC115A0 7878282F 78787878 78787878 78787878  [/(xxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC115B0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC115C0 78787878 78787878 00007878 86004001  [xxxxxxxxxx...@..]
7F8D3FC115D0 C2031F00 78283003 78787878 78787878  [.....0(xxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC115E0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC115F0 78787878 78787878 78787878 00787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.]
7F8D3FC11600 00400100 03200086 283103C2 78787878  [..@... ...1(xxxx]
7F8D3FC11610 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC11630 78787878 40010000 21008600 3203C203  [xxxx...@...!...2]
7F8D3FC11640 78787828 78787878 78787878 78787878  [(xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11650 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11660 78787878 78787878 01000078 00860040  [xxxxxxxxx...@...]
7F8D3FC11670 03C20322 78782833 78787878 78787878  ["...3(xxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11680 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11690 78787878 78787878 78787878 00007878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxx..]
7F8D3FC116A0 86004001 C2032300 78283403 78787878  [.@...#...4(xxxxx]
7F8D3FC116B0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC116D0 00787878 00400100 03240086 283503C2  [xxx...@...$...5(]
7F8D3FC116E0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC11700 78787878 78787878 40010000 25008600  [xxxxxxxx...@...%]
7F8D3FC11710 3603C203 78787828 78787878 78787878  [...6(xxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11720 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11730 78787878 78787878 78787878 01000078  [xxxxxxxxxxxxx...]
7F8D3FC11740 00860040 03C20326 78782837 78787878  [@...&...7(xxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11750 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC11770 00007878 86004001 C2032700 78283803  [xx...@...'...8(x]
7F8D3FC11780 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC117A0 78787878 00787878 00400100 03280086  [xxxxxxx...@...(.]
7F8D3FC117B0 283903C2 78787878 78787878 78787878  [..9(xxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC117C0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC117D0 78787878 78787878 78787878 40010000  [xxxxxxxxxxxx...@]
7F8D3FC117E0 29008600 3A03C203 78787828 78787878  [...)...:(xxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC117F0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC11810 01000078 00860040 03C2032A 7878283B  [x...@...*...;(xx]
7F8D3FC11820 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC11840 78787878 00007878 86004001 C2032B00  [xxxxxx...@...+..]
7F8D3FC11850 78283C03 78787878 78787878 78787878  [.<(xxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11860 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11870 78787878 78787878 00787878 00400100  [xxxxxxxxxxx...@.]
7F8D3FC11880 032C0086 283D03C2 78787878 78787878  [..,...=(xxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11890 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC118B0 40010000 2D008600 3E03C203 78787828  [...@...-...>(xxx]
7F8D3FC118C0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC118E0 78787878 01000078 00860040 03C2032E  [xxxxx...@.......]
7F8D3FC118F0 7878283F 78787878 78787878 78787878  [?(xxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11900 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11910 78787878 78787878 00007878 86004001  [xxxxxxxxxx...@..]
7F8D3FC11920 C2032F00 78284003 78787878 78787878  [./...@(xxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11930 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11940 78787878 78787878 78787878 00787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.]
7F8D3FC11950 00400100 03300086 284103C2 78787878  [..@...0...A(xxxx]
7F8D3FC11960 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC11980 78787878 40010000 31008600 4203C203  [xxxx...@...1...B]
7F8D3FC11990 78787828 78787878 78787878 78787878  [(xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC119A0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC119B0 78787878 78787878 01000078 00860040  [xxxxxxxxx...@...]
7F8D3FC119C0 03C20332 78782843 78787878 78787878  [2...C(xxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC119D0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC119E0 78787878 78787878 78787878 00007878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxx..]
7F8D3FC119F0 86004001 C2033300 78284403 78787878  [.@...3...D(xxxxx]
7F8D3FC11A00 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC11A20 00787878 00400100 03340086 284503C2  [xxx...@...4...E(]
7F8D3FC11A30 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC11A50 78787878 78787878 40010000 35008600  [xxxxxxxx...@...5]
7F8D3FC11A60 4603C203 78787828 78787878 78787878  [...F(xxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11A70 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11A80 78787878 78787878 78787878 01000078  [xxxxxxxxxxxxx...]
7F8D3FC11A90 00860040 03C20336 78782847 78787878  [@...6...G(xxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11AA0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC11AC0 00007878 86004001 C2033700 78284803  [xx...@...7...H(x]
7F8D3FC11AD0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC11AF0 78787878 00787878 00400100 03380086  [xxxxxxx...@...8.]
7F8D3FC11B00 284903C2 78787878 78787878 78787878  [..I(xxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11B10 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11B20 78787878 78787878 78787878 40010000  [xxxxxxxxxxxx...@]
7F8D3FC11B30 39008600 4A03C203 78787828 78787878  [...9...J(xxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11B40 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC11B60 01000078 00860040 03C2033A 7878284B  [x...@...:...K(xx]
7F8D3FC11B70 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC11B90 78787878 00007878 86004001 C2033B00  [xxxxxx...@...;..]
7F8D3FC11BA0 78284C03 78787878 78787878 78787878  [.L(xxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11BB0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11BC0 78787878 78787878 00787878 00400100  [xxxxxxxxxxx...@.]
7F8D3FC11BD0 033C0086 284D03C2 78787878 78787878  [..<...M(xxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11BE0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC11C00 40010000 3D008600 4E03C203 78787828  [...@...=...N(xxx]
7F8D3FC11C10 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC11C30 78787878 01000078 00860040 03C2033E  [xxxxx...@...>...]
7F8D3FC11C40 7878284F 78787878 78787878 78787878  [O(xxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11C50 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11C60 78787878 78787878 00007878 86004001  [xxxxxxxxxx...@..]
7F8D3FC11C70 C2033F00 78285003 78787878 78787878  [.?...P(xxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11C80 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11C90 78787878 78787878 78787878 00787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.]
7F8D3FC11CA0 00400100 03400086 285103C2 78787878  [..@...@...Q(xxxx]
7F8D3FC11CB0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC11CD0 78787878 40010000 41008600 5203C203  [xxxx...@...A...R]
7F8D3FC11CE0 78787828 78787878 78787878 78787878  [(xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11CF0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11D00 78787878 78787878 01000078 00860040  [xxxxxxxxx...@...]
7F8D3FC11D10 03C20342 78782853 78787878 78787878  [B...S(xxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11D20 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11D30 78787878 78787878 78787878 00007878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxx..]
7F8D3FC11D40 86004001 C2034300 78285403 78787878  [.@...C...T(xxxxx]
7F8D3FC11D50 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC11D70 00787878 00400100 03440086 285503C2  [xxx...@...D...U(]
7F8D3FC11D80 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC11DA0 78787878 78787878 40010000 45008600  [xxxxxxxx...@...E]
7F8D3FC11DB0 5603C203 78787828 78787878 78787878  [...V(xxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11DC0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11DD0 78787878 78787878 78787878 01000078  [xxxxxxxxxxxxx...]
7F8D3FC11DE0 00860040 03C20346 78782857 78787878  [@...F...W(xxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11DF0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC11E10 00007878 85004001 C2030000 78285803  [xx...@.......X(x]
7F8D3FC11E20 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC11E40 78787878 00787878 00400100 03010085  [xxxxxxx...@.....]
7F8D3FC11E50 285903C2 78787878 78787878 78787878  [..Y(xxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11E60 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11E70 78787878 78787878 78787878 40010000  [xxxxxxxxxxxx...@]
7F8D3FC11E80 02008500 5A03C203 78787828 78787878  [.......Z(xxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11E90 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC11EB0 01000078 00850040 03C20303 7878285B  [x...@.......[(xx]
7F8D3FC11EC0 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
        Repeat 1 times
7F8D3FC11EE0 78787878 00007878 85004001 C2030400  [xxxxxx...@......]
7F8D3FC11EF0 78285C03 78787878 78787878 78787878  [.\(xxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11F00 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11F10 78787878 78787878 00787878 00400100  [xxxxxxxxxxx...@.]
7F8D3FC11F20 03050085 285D03C2 78787878 78787878  [......](xxxxxxxx]
7F8D3FC11F30 78787878 78787878 78787878 78787878  [xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
  Repeat 1 times
 
REDO RECORD - Thread:1 RBA: 0x00316e.00000025.0164 LEN: 0x0330 VLD: 0x09
SCN: 0x0b86.0d004018 SUBSCN:  1 11/02/2018 19:16:45
CHANGE #1 TYP:2 CLS:1 AFN:5 DBA:0x01400085 OBJ:350366 SCN:0x0b86.0d003f20 SEQ:2 OP:11.2 ENC:0 RBL:0
KTB Redo 
op: 0x11  ver: 0x01  
compat bit: 4 (post-11) padding: 1
op: F  xid:  0x0019.004.00009104    uba: 0x00c1702a.1ea1.2a
Block cleanout record, scn:  0x0b86.0d004016 ver: 0x01 opt: 0x02, entries follow...
  itli: 1  flg: 2  scn: 0x0b86.0d003f1f
  itli: 2  flg: 2  scn: 0x0b86.0d003f20
KDO Op code: IRP row dependencies Disabled
  xtype: XA flags: 0x00000000  bdba: 0x01400085  hdba: 0x01400082
itli: 1  ispac: 0  maxfr: 4858
tabn: 0 slot: 6(0x6) size/delt: 99
fb: --H-FL-- lb: 0x1  cc: 3
null: ---
col  0: [ 3]  c2 03 5e
col  1: [40]
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
col  2: [50]
 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20
 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20
CHANGE #2 TYP:0 CLS:65 AFN:3 DBA:0x00c000a8 OBJ:4294967295 SCN:0x0b86.0d003fdc SEQ:1 OP:5.2 ENC:0 RBL:0
ktudh redo: slt: 0x0004 sqn: 0x00009104 flg: 0x0012 siz: 136 fbi: 0
            uba: 0x00c1702a.1ea1.2a    pxid:  0x0000.000.00000000
CHANGE #3 TYP:0 CLS:1 AFN:5 DBA:0x0140008d OBJ:350367 SCN:0x0b86.0d004016 SEQ:1 OP:10.5 ENC:0 RBL:0
index redo (kdxlre):  restore leaf row
KTB Redo 
op: 0x01  ver: 0x01  
compat bit: 4 (post-11) padding: 1
op: F  xid:  0x0019.004.00009104    uba: 0x00c1702a.1ea1.2b
REDO: SINGLE / -- / -- 
itl: 2, sno: 0, row size 55
CHANGE #4 TYP:0 CLS:65 AFN:3 DBA:0x00c000a8 OBJ:4294967295 SCN:0x0b86.0d004018 SEQ:1 OP:5.4 ENC:0 RBL:0
ktucm redo: slt: 0x0004 sqn: 0x00009104 srt: 0 sta: 9 flg: 0x2 ktucf redo: uba: 0x00c1702a.1ea1.2b ext: 60 spc: 2072 fbi: 0 
CHANGE #5 TYP:0 CLS:66 AFN:3 DBA:0x00c1702a OBJ:4294967295 SCN:0x0b86.0d003fdb SEQ:2 OP:5.1 ENC:0 RBL:0
ktudb redo: siz: 136 spc: 2324 flg: 0x0012 seq: 0x1ea1 rec: 0x2a
            xid:  0x0019.004.00009104  
ktubl redo: slt: 4 rci: 0 opc: 11.1 [objn: 350366 objd: 350366 tsn: 7]
Undo type:  Regular undo        Begin trans    Last buffer split:  No 
Temp Object:  No 
Tablespace Undo:  No 
             0x00000000  prev ctl uba: 0x00c1702a.1ea1.28 
prev ctl max cmt scn:  0x0b86.0d003d78  prev tx cmt scn:  0x0b86.0d003d88 
txn start scn:  0x0b86.0d004017  logon user: 62  prev brb: 12677159  prev bcl: 0 BuExt idx: 0 flg2: 0
KDO undo record:
KTB Redo 
op: 0x04  ver: 0x01  
compat bit: 4 (post-11) padding: 1
op: L  itl: xid:  0x001e.013.0000a096 uba: 0x00c05594.2254.32
                      flg: C---    lkc:  0     scn: 0x0b86.0d003f1f
KDO Op code: DRP row dependencies Disabled
  xtype: XA flags: 0x00000000  bdba: 0x01400085  hdba: 0x01400082
itli: 1  ispac: 0  maxfr: 4858
tabn: 0 slot: 6(0x6)
CHANGE #6 TYP:0 CLS:66 AFN:3 DBA:0x00c1702a OBJ:4294967295 SCN:0x0b86.0d004018 SEQ:1 OP:5.1 ENC:0 RBL:0
ktudb redo: siz: 112 spc: 2186 flg: 0x0022 seq: 0x1ea1 rec: 0x2b
            xid:  0x0019.004.00009104  
ktubu redo: slt: 4 rci: 42 opc: 10.22 objn: 350367 objd: 350367 tsn: 7
Undo type:  Regular undo       Undo type:  Last buffer split:  No 
Tablespace Undo:  No 
             0x00000000
index undo for leaf key operations
KTB Redo 
op: 0x03  ver: 0x01  
compat bit: 4 (post-11) padding: 1
op: Z
Dump kdilk : itl=2, kdxlkflg=0x1 sdc=0 indexid=0x140008a block=0x0140008d
(kdxlpu): purge leaf row
key :(45): 
 03 c2 03 5e 28 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78
END OF REDO DUMP
----- Redo read statistics for thread 1 -----
Read rate (ASYNC): 19Kb in 0.02s => 0.93 Mb/sec
Total redo bytes: 1023Kb Longest record: 8Kb, moves: 0/9 moved: 0Mb (0%)
Longest LWN: 19Kb, reads: 1 
Last redo scn: 0x0b86.0d004018 (12670371643416)
Change vector header moves = 0/22 (0%)
----------------------------------------------
[oracle@linux11 trace]$ 



Summary

REDO RECORD - Thread:1 RBA: 0x00316e.00000002.0010 LEN: 0x0074 VLD: 0x05
(LWN RBA: 0x00316e.00000002.0010 LEN: 0038 NST: 0001 SCN: 0x0b86.0d004016)
CHANGE #1 TYP:2 CLS:1 AFN:5 DBA:0x0140008c OBJ:350367 SCN:0x0b86.0d003f20 SEQ:2 OP:4.1 ENC:0 RBL:0
        Cleanout (the DBA is the high values leaf)

------

REDO RECORD - Thread:1 RBA: 0x00316e.00000002.0084 LEN: 0x0144 VLD: 0x01
CHANGE #1 TYP:0 CLS:75 AFN:3 DBA:0x00c00170 OBJ:4294967295 SCN:0x0b86.0d003fe6 SEQ:1 OP:5.2 ENC:0 RBL:0
        Update undo seg header 
                Start transaction (saves old transaction control data)

CHANGE #2 TYP:0 CLS:76 AFN:3 DBA:0x00c05593 OBJ:4294967295 SCN:0x0b86.0d003fe5 SEQ:2 OP:5.1 ENC:0 RBL:0
ktubl redo: slt: 13 rci: 0 opc: 10.21 [objn: 350367 objd: 350367 tsn: 7]
        index general undo (branch) operations
                Actually undo for high-values leaf.
                Detail "unlock block"

CHANGE #3 TYP:0 CLS:1 AFN:5 DBA:0x0140008c OBJ:350367 SCN:0x0b86.0d004016 SEQ:1 OP:10.6 ENC:0 RBL:0
        Lock block (the DBA is the high values leaf)

------

REDO RECORD - Thread:1 RBA: 0x00316e.00000002.01c8 LEN: 0x20a4 VLD: 0x01
CHANGE #1 TYP:0 CLS:75 AFN:3 DBA:0x00c00170 OBJ:4294967295 SCN:0x0b86.0d004016 SEQ:1 OP:5.2 ENC:0 RBL:0
        Update undo segment header 
                Updates current undo block address
                set to record 1 of new block

CHANGE #2 TYP:1 CLS:76 AFN:3 DBA:0x00c05595 OBJ:4294967295 SCN:0x0b86.0d004016 SEQ:1 OP:5.1 ENC:0 RBL:0
ktubu redo: slt: 13 rci: 0 opc: 10.21 objn: 350367 objd: 350367 tsn: 7
        index general undo (branch) operations
                Actually undo for high-values leaf.
                Saves leaf block before image
                vector size 8,148 bytes

CHANGE #3 TYP:0 CLS:1 AFN:5 DBA:0x0140008c OBJ:350367 SCN:0x0b86.0d004016 SEQ:2 OP:10.9 ENC:0 RBL:0
        Modify service ITL
                the DBA is the high values leaf block
                Set Flag to -B--, Lck to 1

------

REDO RECORD - Thread:1 RBA: 0x00316e.00000013.017c LEN: 0x0044 VLD: 0x01
CHANGE #1 TYP:0 CLS:8 AFN:5 DBA:0x01400088 OBJ:350367 SCN:0x0b86.0d003e8e SEQ:3 OP:13.22 ENC:0 RBL:0
        Update L1 bitmap block 
                Space management for the index segment

------

REDO RECORD - Thread:1 RBA: 0x00316e.00000013.01c0 LEN: 0x01ac VLD: 0x01
CHANGE #1 TYP:0 CLS:75 AFN:3 DBA:0x00c00170 OBJ:4294967295 SCN:0x0b86.0d004016 SEQ:2 OP:5.2 ENC:0 RBL:0
        Update segment header
                Updates current undo block address
                set to record 1 of new block

CHANGE #2 TYP:1 CLS:76 AFN:3 DBA:0x00c05596 OBJ:4294967295 SCN:0x0b86.0d004016 SEQ:1 OP:5.1 ENC:0 RBL:0
ktubu redo: slt: 13 rci: 0 opc: 10.21 objn: 350367 objd: 350367 tsn: 7
        index general undo (branch) operations
                Actually undo for new index leaf block
                Make leaf block empty.

CHANGE #3 TYP:0 CLS:1 AFN:5 DBA:0x0140008d OBJ:350367 SCN:0x0b86.0d003e8e SEQ:2 OP:10.8 ENC:0 RBL:0
        init header of newly allocated leaf block
                the DBA is next block to current high
                Include ITL (with service set to B), and row(s)

------

REDO RECORD - Thread:1 RBA: 0x00316e.00000014.017c LEN: 0x0048 VLD: 0x01
CHANGE #1 TYP:2 CLS:1 AFN:5 DBA:0x0140008b OBJ:350367 SCN:0x0b86.0d003e8f SEQ:2 OP:4.1 ENC:0 RBL:0
        Block cleanout 
                the DBA is the root block
                set the SCN in the service ITL

------

REDO RECORD - Thread:1 RBA: 0x00316e.00000014.01c4 LEN: 0x00e0 VLD: 0x01
CHANGE #1 TYP:0 CLS:76 AFN:3 DBA:0x00c05596 OBJ:4294967295 SCN:0x0b86.0d004016 SEQ:2 OP:5.1 ENC:0 RBL:0
kitubu redo: slt: 13 rci: 1 opc: 10.21 objn: 350367 objd: 350367 tsn: 7
        index general undo (branch) operations
                Modify root block
                Replace service ITL entry
                Purge a row

CHANGE #2 TYP:0 CLS:1 AFN:5 DBA:0x0140008b OBJ:350367 SCN:0x0b86.0d004016 SEQ:1 OP:10.15 ENC:0 RBL:0
        Insert branch block row
                The DBA is the root block
                inserts pointer to new high value block

------

REDO RECORD - Thread:1 RBA: 0x00316e.00000015.00b4 LEN: 0x1fb0 VLD: 0x01
CHANGE #1 TYP:0 CLS:75 AFN:3 DBA:0x00c00170 OBJ:4294967295 SCN:0x0b86.0d004016 SEQ:3 OP:5.4 ENC:0 RBL:0
        Commit transaction
                The recursive transaction for the split

CHANGE #2 TYP:0 CLS:1 AFN:5 DBA:0x0140008c OBJ:350367 SCN:0x0b86.0d004016 SEQ:3 OP:10.8 ENC:0 RBL:0
        init leaf block being split
                the DBA is current high values
                writes most of a block image to disc 

------

REDO RECORD - Thread:1 RBA: 0x00316e.00000025.0164 LEN: 0x0330 VLD: 0x09
CHANGE #1 TYP:2 CLS:1 AFN:5 DBA:0x01400085 OBJ:350366 SCN:0x0b86.0d003f20 SEQ:2 OP:11.2 ENC:0 RBL:0
        Insert row piece
                (to table)
                cleans out current ITL entries

CHANGE #2 TYP:0 CLS:65 AFN:3 DBA:0x00c000a8 OBJ:4294967295 SCN:0x0b86.0d003fdc SEQ:1 OP:5.2 ENC:0 RBL:0
        start transaction 
                new seg header, and transaction table slot

CHANGE #3 TYP:0 CLS:1 AFN:5 DBA:0x0140008d OBJ:350367 SCN:0x0b86.0d004016 SEQ:1 OP:10.5 ENC:0 RBL:0
        restore leaf row
                This is the new high-values block
                Was the image of data from the previous block marked deleted ?

CHANGE #4 TYP:0 CLS:65 AFN:3 DBA:0x00c000a8 OBJ:4294967295 SCN:0x0b86.0d004018 SEQ:1 OP:5.4 ENC:0 RBL:0
        Commit

CHANGE #5 TYP:0 CLS:66 AFN:3 DBA:0x00c1702a OBJ:4294967295 SCN:0x0b86.0d003fdb SEQ:2 OP:5.1 ENC:0 RBL:0
ktubl redo: slt: 4 rci: 0 opc: 11.1 [objn: 350366 objd: 350366 tsn: 7]
        undo row operation
                Undo for a table row insert
                Also holds transaction table control data

CHANGE #6 TYP:0 CLS:66 AFN:3 DBA:0x00c1702a OBJ:4294967295 SCN:0x0b86.0d004018 SEQ:1 OP:5.1 ENC:0 RBL:0
ktubu redo: slt: 4 rci: 42 opc: 10.22 objn: 350367 objd: 350367 tsn: 7
        undo leaf key operation
                Purge the new row from the new leaf block

One detail to note – the sys-recursive transaction operates in “classic” redo style – i.e. one change at a time in separate records in the order of activity; then the user transaction runs in the “modern” redo style using private redo to batch the forward and backward change vectors.

July 25, 2017

Redo OP Codes:

Filed under: Infrastructure,Oracle,redo — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:17 pm GMT Jul 25,2017

This posting was prompted by a tweet from Kamil Stawiarski in response to a question about how he’d discovered the meaning of Redo Op Codes 5.1 and 11.6 – and credited me and Julian Dyke with “the hardest part”.

Over the years I’ve accumulated (from Julian Dyke, or odd MoS notes, etc.) and let dribble out the occasional interpretation of a few op codes – typically in response to a question on the OTN database forum or the Oracle-L listserver, and sometimes as a throwaway comment in a blog post, but I’ve never published the full set of codes that I’ve acquired (or guessed) to date.

It’s been some time since I’ve looked closely at a redo stream, and there are many features of Oracle that I’ve never had to look at at the level of the redo so there are plenty of gaps in the list – and maybe a few people will use the comments to help fill the gaps.

It’s possible that I may be able to add more op codes over the new days – I know that somewhere I have some op codes relating to space management, and a batch relating to LOB handling, but it looks like I forgot to add them to the master list – so here’s what I can offer so far:


1	Transaction Control

2	Transaction read

3	Transaction update

4	Block cleanout
		4.1	Block cleanout record
		4.2	Physical cleanout
		4.3	Single array change
		4.4	Multiple array changes
		4.5	Format block
		4.6	ktbcc redo -  Commit Time Block Cleanout Change (?RAC, ?recursive, ?SYS objects)

5	Transaction undo management
		5.1	Update undo block
		5.2	Get undo header
		5.3	Rollout a transaction begin
		5.4	On a rollback or commit
		5.5	Create rollback segmenr
		5.6	On a rollback of an insert
		5.7	In the ktubl for 'dbms_transaction.local_transaction_id'
			(begin transaction) - also arrives for incoming distributed
			tx, no data change but TT slot acquired. Also for recursive
			transaction (e.g. truncate). txn start scn:  0xffff.ffffffff
		5.8	Mark transaction as dead
		5.9	Rollback extension of rollback seg
		5.10	Rollback segment header change for extension of rollback seg
		5.11	Mark undo as applied during rollback
		5.19	Transaction audit record - first
		5.20	Transaction audit record - subsequent
		5.23	ktudbr redo: disable block level recovery (reports XID)
		5.24	ktfbhundo - File Space Header Undo

6	Control file

10	Index
		10.1	SQL load index block
		10.2	Insert Leaf Row
		10.3	Purge Leaf Row
		10.4	Delete Leaf Row
		10.5	Restore Leaf during rollback
		10.6	(kdxlok) Lock block (pre-split?)
		10.7	(kdxulo) unlock block during undo
		10.8	(kdxlne) initialize leaf block being split
		10.9	(kdxair) apply XAT do to ITL 1	-- (service ITL) related to leaf block split
		10.10	Set leaf block next pointer
		10.11	(kdxlpr) (UNDO) set kdxleprv (previous pointer)
		10.12 	Initialize root block after split
		10.13	index redo (kdxlem): (REDO) make leaf block empty,
		10.14	Restore block before image
		10.15	(kdxbin) Insert branch block row
		10.16	Purge branch row
		10.17	Initialize new branch block
		10.18	Update key data in row -- index redo (kdxlup): update keydata
		10.19	Clear split flag
		10.20	Set split flag
		10.21	index general undo (branch) operations
		10.22	Undo leaf operation
		10.23	restore block to tree
		10.24	Shrink ITL
		10.25	format root block
		10.26	format root block (undo)
		10.27	format root block (redo)
		10.28	Migrating block (undo)
		10.29	Migrating block (redo)
		10.30	Update nonkey value
		10.31	index root block redo (kdxdlr):  create/load index
		10.34 	make branch block empty
		10.35	index redo (kdxlcnu): update nonkey
		10.37	undo index change (kdxIndexlogicalNonkeyUpdate) -- bitmap index
		10.38	index change (kdxIndexlogicalNonkeyUpdate) -- bitmap index
		10.39	index redo (kdxbur) :  branch block update range
		10.40	index redo (kdxbdu) :  branch block DBA update,

11	Table
		11.1  undo row operation
		11.2  insert row  piece
		11.3  delete row piece
		11.4  lock row piece
		11.5  update row piece
		11.6  overwrite row piece
		11.7  manipulate first column
		11.8  change forwarding address - migration
		11.9  change cluster key index
		11.10 Set Cluster key pointers
		11.11 Insert multiple rows
		11.12 Delete multiple rows
		11.13 toggle block header flags
		11.17 Update multiple rows
		11.19 Array update ?
		11.20 SHK (mark as shrunk?)
		11.24 HCC update rowid map ?

12	Cluster

13	Segment management
		13.1	ktsfm redo: -- allocate space ??
		13.5	KTSFRBFMT (block format) redo
		13.6	(block link modify) (? index )  (options: lock clear, lock set)
		13.7	KTSFRGRP (fgb/shdr modify freelist) redo: (options unlink block, move HWM)
		13.13	ktsbbu undo - undo operation on bitmap block
		13.14	ktsbbu undo - undo operation on bitmap block
		13.17	ktsphfredo - Format Pagetable Segment Header
		13.18	ktspffredo - Format Level1 Bitmap Block
		13.19	ktspsfredo - Format Level2 Bitmap Block
		13.21	ktspbfredo - Format Pagetable Datablock
		13.22	State change on level 1 bitmap block
		13.23	Undo on level 1 bitmap block
		13.24	Bitmap block (BMB) state change (level 2 ?)
		13.25	Undo on level 2 bitmap block
		13.26	?? Level 3 bitmap block state change ??
		13.27	?? Level 3 bitmap block undo ??
		13.28	Update LHWM and HHWM on segment header
		13.29	Undo on segment header
		13.31	Segment shrink redo for L1 bitmap block
		13.32	Segment shrink redo for segment header block

14	Extent management
		14.1	ktecush redo: clear extent control lock
		14.2	ktelk redo - lock extent (map)
		14.3	Extent de-allocate
		14.4	kteop redo - redo operation on extent map
		14.5	kteopu undo - undo operation on extent map
		14.8	kteoputrn - undo operation for flush for truncate

15	Tablespace

16	Row cache

17	Recovery management
		17.1	End backup mode marker
		17.3	Crash Recovery at scn:  0x0000.02429111
		17.28	STANDBY METADATA CACHE INVALIDATION

18	Block image (hot backups)
		18.1	Block image
		18.3	Reuse redo entry
				   (Range reuse: tsn=1 base=8388753 nblks=8)
				or (Object reuse: tsn=2 objd=76515)

19	Direct loader
		19.1	Direct load block record
		19.2	Nologging invalidate block range
			Direct Loader invalidate block range redo entry

20	Compatibility segment

21	LOB segment
		21.1	kdlop (Long Feild) redo:  [sic]
				(insert basicfile clob)

22	Locally managed tablespace
		22.2	ktfbhredo - File Space Header Redo:
		22.3	ktfbhundo - File Space Header Undo:
		22.5	ktfbbredo - File BitMap Block Redo:
		22.16	File Property Map Block (FPM)

23	Block writes
		23.1	Block written record
		23.2	Block read record (BRR) -- reference in Doc ID: 12423475.8 (lost write detection)

24	DDL statements
		24.1	DDL
		24.2	Direct load block end mark
		24.4	?? Media recovery marker
		24.10	??
		24.11	??

(E & O.E) – you’ll notice that some of the descriptions include question marks – those are guesses – and some are little more than the raw text extracted from a redo change vector with no interpretation of what they might mean.

Update

It didn’t take long for someone to email me a much longer list that has been published elsewhere on the Internet. The results don’t have the hierarchical style display I have above, so I may copy the extra entries into the list above when I get a little time.

August 25, 2015

Truncate

Filed under: Infrastructure,Oracle,redo,undo — Jonathan Lewis @ 8:39 am GMT Aug 25,2015

The old question about truncate and undo (“does a truncate generate undo or not”) appeared on the OTN database forum over the week-end and then devolved into “what really happens on a truncate” and then carried on.

The quick answer to the traditional question is essentially this: the actual truncate activity typically generates very little undo (and redo) compared to a full delete of all the data because all it does is tidy up any space management blocks and update the data dictionary; the undo and redo generated is only about the metadata, not about the data itself.

Of course, a reasonable response to the quick answer is: “how do you prove that?” – so I suggested that all you had to do was “switch logfile, truncate a table, dump logfile”. Unfortunately I realised that I had never bothered to do this myself and, despite having far more useful things to do, I couldn’t resist wasting some of my evening doing it. Here’s the little script I wrote to help


create table t2 (v1 varchar2(32));
insert into t2 values (rpad('A',32));
commit;

create table t1
nologging
as
with generator as (
        select  --+ materialize
                rownum id
        from dual
        connect by
                level <= 1e4 -- > comment to avoid wordpress format issue
)
select
        rownum                  id, 
        rpad('x',100)           padding
from
        generator       v1,
        generator       v2
where
        rownum <= 1e5 -- > comment to avoid wordpress format issue
;

create index t1_i1 on t1(id);
alter system flush buffer_cache;
execute dbms_lock.sleep(3)

alter system switch logfile;

insert into t2 values(rpad('X',32));

truncate table t1;

insert into t2 values(rpad('Y',32));
commit;

execute dump_log

Procedure dump_log simply dumps the current log file. The call to switch logfile keeps the dumped log file as small as possible; and I’ve flushed the buffer cache with a three second sleep to minimise the number of misleading “Block Written Record” entries that might otherwise appear in the log file after the truncate. There were all sorts of interesting little details in the resulting activity when I tested this on 12.1.0.2 – here’s one that’s easy to spot before you even look at the trace file:


SQL> select object_id, data_object_id, object_name from user_objects where object_name like 'T1%';

 OBJECT_ID DATA_OBJECT_ID OBJECT_NAME
---------- -------------- --------------------
    108705         108706 T1_I1
    108704         108707 T1

Notice how the data_object_id of the index is smaller than that of the table after the truncate ? Oracle truncates (and renumbers) the index before truncating the table.

The truncate activity was pretty much as I had assumed it would be – with one significant variation. The total number of change vectors reported was 272 in 183 redo records (your numbers may vary slightly if you try to reproduce the example), and here’s a summary of the redo OP codes that showed up in those change vectors in order of frequency:


Change operations
=================
  1 OP:10.25    Format root block
  1 OP:11.11    Insert multiple rows (table)
  1 OP:24.1     DDL
  1 OP:4.1      Block cleanout record
  2 OP:10.4     Delete leaf row
  2 OP:13.28    HWM on segment header block
  3 OP:10.2     Insert leaf row
  3 OP:17.28    standby metadata cache invalidation
  4 OP:11.19    Array update (index)
  4 OP:11.5     Update row (index)
 10 OP:13.24    Bitmap Block state change (Level 2)
 11 OP:23.1     Block written record
 12 OP:14.1     redo: clear extent control lock
 12 OP:22.5     File BitMap Block Redo
 14 OP:14.2     redo - lock extent (map)
 14 OP:14.4     redo - redo operation on extent map
 14 OP:5.4      Commit / Rollback
 15 OP:18.3     Reuse record (object or range)
 15 OP:22.16    File Property Map Block (FPM)
 22 OP:13.22    State on Level 1 bitmap block
 24 OP:22.2     File Space Header Redo
 29 OP:5.2      Get undo header
 58 OP:5.1      Update undo block

The line that surprised me was the 14 commit/rollback OP codes – a single truncate appears to have operated as 14 separate (recursive) transactions. I did start to walk through the trace file to work out the exact order of operation but it’s a really tedious and messy task so I just did a quick scan to get the picture. I may have made a couple of mistakes in the following but I think the steps were:

  • Start transaction
  • Lock the extent map for the INDEX segment — no undo needed
  • Lock each bitmap (space management) block  — no undo needed
  • Reset each bitmap block — undo needed to preserve space management information
  • Reset highwater marks where relevant on bitmap and segment header block — undo needed
  • Clear segment header block — undo needed
  • Write all the updated space management blocks to disc (local write waits)
    • Log file records “Block Written Record”.
  • For each space management block in turn
    • Update space management blocks with new data object_id — undo needed
    • Write the updated block to disc (local write wait)
    • Log file records one “Block Written Record” for each block
  • Repeat all the above for the TABLE segment.
  • Start a recursive transaction
    • Insert a row into mon_mod$ — undo needed
    • recursive commit
  • Set DDL marker in redo log (possibly holding the text of the DDL statement, but it’s not visible in the dump)
  • Set object reuse markers in the redo log
  • update tab$  — needs undo, it’s just DML
  • update ind$ — needs undo, it’s just DML
  • update seg$  — needs undo, it’s just DML (twice – once for table once for index)
  • update obj$ — needs undo, it’s just DML (twice – ditto)
  • COMMIT — at last, with a change vector for a “Standby metadata cache invalidation” marker

The remaining 12 transactions look like things that could be delayed to tidy up things like space management blocks for the files and tablespaces and releasing “block locks”.

This first, long, transaction, is the thing that has to happen as an atomic event to truncate the table – and you can imagine that if the database crashed (or you crashed the session) in the middle of a very slow truncate then there seems to be enough information being recorded in the undo to allow the database to roll forward an incomplete truncate, and then roll back to before the truncate.

It would be possible to test whether or not this would actually work – but I wouldn’t want to do it on a database that anyone else was using.

March 9, 2015

Flashback logging

Filed under: Infrastructure,Oracle,redo,undo — Jonathan Lewis @ 2:44 pm GMT Mar 9,2015

When database flashback first appeared many years ago I commented (somewhere, but don’t ask me where) that it seemed like a very nice idea for full-scale test databases if you wanted to test the impact of changes to batch code, but I couldn’t really see it being a good idea for live production systems because of the overheads.

Features and circumstances change, of course, and someone recently pointed out that if your production system is multi-terabyte and you’re running with a dataguard standby and some minor catastrophe forces you to switch to the standby then you don’t really want to be running without a standby for the time it would take for you to use restore and recover an old backup to create a new standby and there may be cases where you could flashback the original primary to before the catastrophe and turn it into the standby from that point onward. Sounds like a reasonable argument to me – but you might still need to think very carefully about how to minimise the impact of enabling database flashback, especially if your database is a data warehouse, DSS, or mixed system.

Imagine you have a batch processes that revolve around loading data into an empty table with a couple of indexes – it’s a production system so you’re running with archivelog mode enabled, and one day you’re told to switch on database flashback. How much impact will that have on your current loading strategies? Here’s a little bit of code to help you on your way – I create an empty table as a clone of the view all_objects, and create one index, then I insert 1.6M rows into it. I’ve generated 4 different sets of results: flashback on or off, then either maintaining the index during loading or marking it unusable then rebuilding it after the load. Here’s the minimum code:


rem
rem     Script:         flashback_overheads.sql
rem     Author:         Jonathan Lewis
rem     Dated:          Feb 2015
rem     Purpose:
rem
rem     Last tested
rem             11.2.0.4
rem

create table t1 segment creation immediate tablespace test_8k
as
select * from all_objects
where   rownum < 1
;

create index t1_i1 on t1(object_name, object_id) tablespace test_8k_assm_auto;
-- alter index t1_i1 unusable;

insert /*+ append */ into t1
with object_data as (
        select --+ materialize
                *
        from
                all_objects
        where
                rownum <= 50000
),
counter as (
        select  --+ materialize
                rownum id
        from dual
        connect by
                level <= 32
)
select
        /*+ leading (ctr obj) use_nl(obj) */
        obj.*
from
        counter         ctr,
        object_data     obj
;

-- alter index t1_i1 rebuild;

Here’s a quick summary of the timing I got  before I talk about the effects (running 11.2.0.4):

Flashback off:
Maintain index in real time: 138 seconds
Rebuild index at end: 66 seconds

Flashback on:
Maintain index in real time: 214 seconds
Rebuild index at end: 112 seconds

It is very important to note that these timings do not allow you to draw any generic conclusions about optimum strategies for your systems. The only interpretation you can put on them is that different circumstances may lead to very different timings, so it’s worth looking at what you could do with your own systems to find good strategies for different cases.

Most significant, probably, is the big difference between the two options where flashback is enabled – if you’ve got to use it, how do you do damage limitation. Here are some key figures, namely the file I/O stats and the some instance activity stats, I/O stats first:


"Real-time" maintenance
---------------------------------
Tempfile Stats - 09-Mar 11:41:57
---------------------------------
file#       Reads      Blocks    Avg Size   Avg Csecs     S_Reads   Avg Csecs    Writes      Blocks   Avg Csecs    File name
-----       -----      ------    --------   ---------     -------   ---------    ------      ------   ---------    -------------------
    1       1,088      22,454      20.638        .063         296        .000     1,011      22,455        .000    /u01/app/oracle/oradata/TEST/datafile/o1_mf_temp_938s5v4n_.tmp

---------------------------------
Datafile Stats - 09-Mar 11:41:58
---------------------------------
file#       Reads      Blocks    Avg Size   Avg Csecs     S_Reads   Avg Csecs     M_Reads   Avg Csecs         Writes      Blocks   Avg Csecs    File name
-----       -----      ------    --------   ---------     -------   ---------     -------   ---------         ------      ------   ---------    -------------------
    3      24,802      24,802       1.000        .315      24,802        .315           0        .000          2,386      20,379        .239    /u01/app/oracle/oradata/TEST/datafile/o1_mf_undotbs1_938s5n46_.dbf
    5         718      22,805      31.762        .001           5        .000         713        .002            725      22,814        .002    /u01/app/oracle/oradata/TEST/datafile/o1_mf_test_8k_bcdy0y3h_.dbf
    6       8,485       8,485       1.000        .317       8,485        .317           0        .000            785       6,938        .348    /u01/app/oracle/oradata/TEST/datafile/o1_mf_test_8k__bfqsmt60_.dbf

Mark Unusable and Rebuild
---------------------------------
Tempfile Stats - 09-Mar 11:53:04
---------------------------------
file#       Reads      Blocks    Avg Size   Avg Csecs     S_Reads   Avg Csecs    Writes      Blocks   Avg Csecs    File name
-----       -----      ------    --------   ---------     -------   ---------    ------      ------   ---------    -------------------
    1       1,461      10,508       7.192        .100           1        .017       407      10,508        .000    /u01/app/oracle/oradata/TEST/datafile/o1_mf_temp_938s5v4n_.tmp

---------------------------------
Datafile Stats - 09-Mar 11:53:05
---------------------------------
file#       Reads      Blocks    Avg Size   Avg Csecs     S_Reads   Avg Csecs     M_Reads   Avg Csecs         Writes      Blocks   Avg Csecs    File name
-----       -----      ------    --------   ---------     -------   ---------     -------   ---------         ------      ------   ---------    -------------------
    3          17          17       1.000       5.830          17       5.830           0        .000             28          49       1.636    /u01/app/oracle/oradata/TEST/datafile/o1_mf_undotbs1_938s5n46_.dbf
    5         894      45,602      51.009        .001           2        .002         892        .001            721      22,811        .026    /u01/app/oracle/oradata/TEST/datafile/o1_mf_test_8k_bcdy0y3h_.dbf
    6       2,586       9,356       3.618        .313         264       3.064       2,322        .001          2,443       9,214        .000    /u01/app/oracle/oradata/TEST/datafile/o1_mf_test_8k__bfqsmt60_.dbf

There are all sorts of interesting differences in these results due to the different way in which Oracle handles the index. For the “real-time” maintenance the session accumulates the key values and rowids as it writes the table, then sorts them, then does an cache-based bulk update to the index. For the “rebuild” strategy Oracle simply scans the table after it has been loaded, sorts the key values and indexes, then writes the index to disc using direct path writes; you might expect the total work done to be roughly the same in both cases – but it’s not.

I’ve shown 4 files: the temporary tablespace, the undo tablespace, the tablespace holding the table and the tablespace holding the index; and the first obvious difference is the number of blocks written and read and the change in average read size on the temporary tablespace. Both sessions had to spill to disc for the sort, and both did a “one-pass” sort; the difference in the number of blocks written and read appears because the “real-time” session wrote the sorted data set back to the temporary tablespace one more time than it really needed to – it merged the sorted data in a single pass but wrote the data back to the temporary tablespace before reading it again and applying it to the index (for a couple of points on tracing sorts, see this posting). I don’t know why Oracle chose to use a much smaller read slot size in the second case, though.

The next most dramatic thing we see is that real-time maintenance introduced 24,800 single block reads with 20,000 blocks written to the undo tablespace (with a few thousand more that would eventually be written by dbwr – I should have included a “flush buffer_cache” in my tests), compared to virtually no activity in the “rebuild” case. The rebuild generates no undo; real-time maintenance (even starting with an empty index) generates undo because (in theory) someone might look at the index and need to see a read-consistent image of it. So it’s not surprising that we see a lot of writes to the undo tablespace – but where did the reads come from? I’ll answer question that later.

It’s probably not a surprise to see the difference in the number of blocks read from the table’s tablespace. When we rebuild the index we have to do a tablescan to acquire the data; but, again, we can ask why did we see 22,800 blocks read from the table’s tablespace when we were doing the insert with real-time maintenance. On a positive note those reads were multiblock reads, but what caused them? Again, I’ll postpone the answer.

Finally we see that the number of blocks read (reason again postponed) and written to the index’s tablespace are roughly similar. The writes differ because because the rebuild is doing direct path writes, while the real-time maintenance is done in the buffer cache, so there are some outstanding index blocks to be written. The reads are similar, though one test is exclusively single block reads and the other is doing (small) multiblock reads – which is just a little bit more efficient.  The difference in the number of reads is because the rebuild was at the default pctfree=10 while the index maintenance was a massive “insert in order” which would have packed the index leaf blocks at 100%.

To start the explanation – here are the most significant activity stats – some for the session, a couple for the instance:


"Real-time" maintenance
-----------------------
Name                                                                     Value
----                                                                     -----
physical reads for flashback new                                        33,263
redo entries                                                           118,290
redo size                                                          466,628,852
redo size for direct writes                                        187,616,044
undo change vector size                                            134,282,356
flashback log write bytes                                          441,032,704

Rebuild
-------
Name                                                                     Value
----                                                                     -----
physical reads for flashback new                                           156
redo entries                                                            35,055
redo size                                                          263,801,792
redo size for direct writes                                        263,407,628
undo change vector size                                                122,156
flashback log write bytes                                          278,036,480

The big clue is the “physical reads for flashback new”. When you modify a block, if it hasn’t been dumped into the flashback log recently (as defined by the hidden _flashback_barrier_interval parameter) then the original version of the block has to be written to the flashback log before the change can be applied; moreover, if a block is being “newed” (Oracle-speak for being reformatted for a new use) it will also be written to flashback log. Given the way that the undo tablespace works it’s not surprising if virtually every block you modify in the undo tablespace has to be written to the flashback log before you use it. The 33,264 blocks read for “flashback new” consists of the 24,800 blocks read from the undo tablespace when we were maintaining the index in real-time plus a further 8,460 from “somewhere” – which, probably not coincidentally, matches the number of blocks read from the index tablespace as we create the index. The odd thing is that we don’t see the 22,800 reads on the table’s tablespace (which don’t occur when flashback is off) reported as “physical reads for flashback new”; this looks like a reporting error to me.

So the volume of undo requires us to generate a lot of flashback log as well as the usual increase in the amount of redo. As a little side note, we get confirmation from these stats that the index was rebuilt using direct path writes – there’s an extra 75MB of redo for direct writes.

Summary

If you are running with flashback enabled in a system that’s doing high volume data loading remember that the “physical reads for flashback new” could be a major expense. This is particularly expensive on index maintenance, which can result in a large number single block reads of the undo tablespace. The undo costs you three times – once for the basic cost of undo (and associated redo), once for the extra reads, and once for writing the flashback log. Although you have to do tablescans to rebuild indexes, the cost of an (efficient, possibly direct path) tablescan may be much less than the penalty of the work relating to flashback.

Footnote:

Since you can’t (officially) load data into a table with an unusable unique index or constraint, you may want to experiment with using non-unique indexes to support unique/PK constraints and disabling the constraints while loading.

December 23, 2014

Just in case

Filed under: Infrastructure,Oracle,Performance,redo — Jonathan Lewis @ 10:37 am GMT Dec 23,2014

For those who don’t read Oracle-l and haven’t found Nikolay Savvinov’s blog, here’s a little note pulling together a recent question on Oracle-L and a relevant (and probably unexpected) observation from the blog. The question (paraphrased) was:

The developers/data modelers are creating all the tables with varchar2(4000) as standard by default “Just in case we need it”. What do you think of this idea?

The general answer was that it’s a bad idea (and unnecessary, anyway) and one specific threat that got mentioned was the problem of creating indexes and Oracle error ORA-01450; Coincidentally, though, Nikolay Savvinov had written about a performance-related “bug” in August this year which turned out, only last week, to be expected behaviour. You can read his articles for the details but since he used a 4KB block size to demonstrate it I thought I’d repeat the exercise using an 8KB block size.

 


rem
rem     Script:         column_length_threat.sql
rem     Author:         Jonathan Lewis
rem     Dated:          Dec 2014
rem

drop table t1 purge;
create table t1 (id number(6), v1 varchar(40), v2 varchar2(40), v3 varchar2(40));
create unique index t1_i1 on t1(id);

execute snap_redo.start_snap

insert into t1 
select	object_id, object_name, object_name, object_name 
from	all_objects
where	rownum <= 10000 --> comment to avoid wordpress format issue
;

execute snap_redo.end_snap


drop table t1 purge;
create table t1 (id number(6), v1 varchar(4000), v2 varchar2(4000), v3 varchar2(4000));
create unique index t1_i1 on t1(id);

execute snap_redo.start_snap

insert into t1 
select	object_id, object_name, object_name, object_name 
from	all_objects
where	rownum <= 10000 --> comment to avoid wordpress format issue
;

execute snap_redo.end_snap

I’ve dropped and created the same table twice, once with varchar2(40) columns and once with varchar2(4000) columns.

I’ve created an index on a (non-character) column – the specific results vary depending on whether the index is unique or non-unique, and whether or not you have the index, and whether or not the table already holds data, and the effective clustering on the index columns etc. etc. but the key difference between the two sets of results doesn’t go away.

I’ve inserted object_name values (maximum usage 32 bytes) into the varchar2() columns, inserting 10,000 rows.

The snap_redo package is one of my simple pre/post packages that calculates changes in values in some dynamic performance view – in this case it’s looking at v$sysstat (system statistics) for statistics relating to redo generation, which means you need to run this test on an otherwise idle instance. Here are the two sets of results from an instance of 11.2.0.4:


Name                                                                     Value
----                                                                     -----
messages sent                                                               11
messages received                                                           11
calls to kcmgcs                                                            313
calls to kcmgas                                                             37
calls to get snapshot scn: kcmgss                                           74
redo entries                                                               769
redo size                                                            1,317,008
redo wastage                                                             3,888
redo writes                                                                 11
redo blocks written                                                      2,664
redo write time                                                             10
redo blocks checksummed by FG (exclusive)                                2,242
redo ordering marks                                                          1
redo subscn max counts                                                       1
redo synch time                                                              7
redo synch time (usec)                                                  88,875
redo synch time overhead (usec)                                          1,810
redo synch time overhead count (<2 msec)                                    11
redo synch writes                                                           11
redo write info find                                                        11
undo change vector size                                                261,136
rollback changes - undo records applied                                      2
IMU undo allocation size                                                17,184


Name                                                                     Value
----                                                                     -----
messages sent                                                                8
messages received                                                            8
calls to kcmgcs                                                            222
calls to kcmgas                                                             56
calls to get snapshot scn: kcmgss                                           52
redo entries                                                            20,409
redo size                                                            5,606,872
redo buffer allocation retries                                               1
redo wastage                                                             1,248
redo writes                                                                  6
redo blocks written                                                     11,324
redo write time                                                             26
redo blocks checksummed by FG (exclusive)                                  571
redo ordering marks                                                         32
redo subscn max counts                                                       1
redo synch time                                                              6
redo synch time (usec)                                                  60,230
redo synch time overhead (usec)                                            159
redo synch time overhead count (<2 msec)                                     1
redo synch writes                                                            1
redo write info find                                                         1
undo change vector size                                              1,590,520
IMU undo allocation size                                                   144

Notice, particularly, the great change in the number of redo entries and the total redo size when the character columns are defined at varchar2(4000). Note particularly that the number of redo entries is roughly “2 * number of rows inserted” – that’s one for each row itself and one for each index entry. You can check the redo log content by dump the log file, of course (and Nikolay did), or you can take my word for it that Oracle is doing the equivalent of single row processing in the varchar2(4000) case and array processing in the varchar2(40) case.

When Oracle calculates that the row length definition (not data) is larger than the block size it falls back to single row processing; this can increase your redo generation significantly, and since the rate at which you can pump out redo is the ultimate rate at which you can load data this could have a significant impact on your data loading times. Declaring character columns as varchar2(4000) “just in case” is a bad idea.

Addendum (Sept 2018)

One of the strangest things about my own blog is that I often re-discover things I had forgotten about one topic while searching for an article on something complete different. Today’s little surprise was find a comment by Christo Kutrovsky that is relevant to the “long column definitions” while searching for something I’d written about using non-unique indexes to enforce unique constraints.

Here’s the link to the comment Christo made about the way that the mechanics of nested loop joins will change if the select list is greater than 8,100 bytes. (Inevitably the example raises the question of whether the limit could be related to the block size, or whether it’s an absolute value, and whether – three years later – it still applies in the latest versions of Oracle; but it’s an interesting point about how so many aspects of Oracle can run into strange edge cases.)

 

 

November 7, 2014

Quiz night

Filed under: Infrastructure,Oracle,redo — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:37 pm GMT Nov 7,2014

Prompted by an email from Yves Colin (who’ll be presenting on the Tuesday of UKOUG Tech14) I decided to dig out a little script I wrote some years ago and re-run an old test before asking this simple question:  What’s the largest size array insert that Oracle will handle ?

If you’re tempted to answer, watch out – it’s not exactly a trick question, but there is a bit of a catch.

Answer:

There is an internal limit of 255 on the size of array that Oracle can insert as a unit. I leave it as an exercise to the reader to decide whether or not this makes any significant difference to performance since the effects of row size, number of indexes maintained, and disk I/O requirements may make the effects of the limit virtually undetectable. To demonstrate the limit all we need do is insert a few hundred rows into a table and do a block dump, optionally followed by a dump of the redo log.


create table t1 (n1 number not null) segment creation immediate;

alter system switch logfile;

insert into t1 select rownum from all_objects where rownum <= 1000;
commit;

execute dump_log

start rowid_count t1

/*
   FILE_NO   BLOCK_NO ROWS_IN_BLOCK
---------- ---------- -------------
         5        180           660
         5        184           340

2 rows selected.


ROWS_IN_BLOCK     BLOCKS
------------- ----------
          340          1
          660          1

2 rows selected.
*/

alter system flush buffer_cache;

alter system dump datafile 5 block 180;

The dump_log procedure is simply a pl/sql wrapper for a call to ‘alter system dump logfile {current log}’; the script rowid_count.sql extracts the file and block numbers from rowids in the given table and aggregates them in different ways.  The reason for running the script is to find a table block with a lot of rows in it; the block I dumped actually held the first 660 rows of the insert. Here’s a tiny extract from the block dump (with one little comment added):


tab 0, row 0, @0x1904			-- 6,400 dec
tl: 6 fb: --H-FL-- lb: 0x1  cc: 1
col  0: [ 2]  c1 02
tab 0, row 1, @0x190a
tl: 6 fb: --H-FL-- lb: 0x1  cc: 1
col  0: [ 2]  c1 03
tab 0, row 2, @0x1910
tl: 6 fb: --H-FL-- lb: 0x1  cc: 1
col  0: [ 2]  c1 04
tab 0, row 3, @0x1916
tl: 6 fb: --H-FL-- lb: 0x1  cc: 1

This shows the first four rows inserted, and you can see that the offset from the row directory entry to the actual locaation of the first row is 6,400 bytes, and then each subsequent row is 6 bytes further down the block (when the values in the n1 column get larger the row lengths will increase to 7 bytes). The positioning of these rows is, at first sight, a little odd – you might have guessed that they would either start at offset “zero” and work down to offset “8K”, or start at “8K” and work backwards up to zero – why is the first row 3/4 of the way down the block ?

Rather than show you more row dumps, I’ll give you a carefully selected extract from the row directory:


0x12:pri[0]     offs=0x1904
0x14:pri[1]     offs=0x190a

...

0x20c:pri[253]  offs=0x1f8a
0x20e:pri[254]  offs=0x1f91		End of first 255 rows
0x210:pri[255]  offs=0x120e		Start of second 255 rows
0x212:pri[256]  offs=0x1215

...

0x40a:pri[508]  offs=0x18f6
0x40c:pri[509]  offs=0x18fd		End of second 255 rows
0x40e:pri[510]  offs=0xdf5		Start of last 150 rows
0x410:pri[511]  offs=0xdfc

...

0x536:pri[658]  offs=0x1200
0x538:pri[659]  offs=0x1207		End of last 150 rows

The first 255 rows inserted are stacked at the bottom of the block at offsets 0x1904 to 0x1f91.
The second 255 rows inserted are stacked above them at offsets 0x120e to 0x18fd (note 0x18fd + 6 = 0x1903)
The last 150 rows inserted are stack above them at offsets 0xdf5 to 0x1207 (note 0x1207 + 6 = 0x120d)

No matter how large your attempted array insert, the maximum number of rows (or index entries) Oracle can insert into a block in a single internal array operation is 255.

Further corroboration comes from the redo log dump – here’s a tiny bit of a single change vector (i.e. a single atomic change to a single Oracle block) from the redo generated while this insert was going on:


CHANGE #18 CON_ID:0 TYP:0 CLS:1 AFN:5 DBA:0x014000c7 OBJ:95876 SCN:0x0000.007528dd SEQ:1 OP:11.11 ENC:0 RBL:0 FLG:0x0000
KTB Redo
op: 0x01  ver: 0x01
compat bit: 4 (post-11) padding: 1
op: F  xid:  0x0007.007.000009f2    uba: 0x01000bda.02a9.14
KDO Op code: QMI row dependencies Disabled
  xtype: XA flags: 0x00000000  bdba: 0x014000c7  hdba: 0x01400083
itli: 1  ispac: 0  maxfr: 4858
tabn: 0 lock: 1 nrow: 255
slot[0]: 0
tl: 6 fb: --H-FL-- lb: 0x0  cc: 1
col  0: [ 2]  c1 02
slot[1]: 1
tl: 6 fb: --H-FL-- lb: 0x0  cc: 1
col  0: [ 2]  c1 03
slot[2]: 2
tl: 6 fb: --H-FL-- lb: 0x0  cc: 1
col  0: [ 2]  c1 04

Although the CON_ID in line 1 tells you this dump is from 12c the same limit holds across all (modern) versions of Oracle. The operation (OP 11.11 – in line 1) is “Insert Multiple Rows”, and at line 9 you can see: “nrow: 255”. I haven’t included the rest of the change vector, but all it does is show the remaining 252 rows.

June 25, 2013

12c

Filed under: 12c,Infrastructure,Oracle,Partitioning,redo — Jonathan Lewis @ 11:43 pm GMT Jun 25,2013

The news is out that 12c is now available for download (Code, Docs and Tutorials). There are plenty of nice little bits in it, and several important additions or enhancements to the optimizer, but there’s one feature that might prove to be very popular:

SQL> alter table p1 move partition solo ONLINE;

Table altered.

(more…)

October 5, 2012

SSD

Filed under: Exadata,Infrastructure,Oracle,Performance,redo — Jonathan Lewis @ 1:04 pm GMT Oct 5,2012

There’s never enough time to read everything that’s worth reading, so even though Guy Harrison’s blog is one of the ones worth reading I find that it’s often months since I last read it. Visiting it late last night, I found an interesting batch of articles spread over the last year about the performance of SSD – the conclusions may not be what you expect, but make sure you read all the articles or you might end up with a completely misleading impression:

Don’t forget to read the comments as well. For other notes Guy has written about SSD, here’s a URL for his SSD tag.

September 17, 2012

Private Redo

Filed under: Infrastructure,Oracle,redo — Jonathan Lewis @ 8:28 pm GMT Sep 17,2012

Following a question on the Oracle Core Addenda pages, here’s a little script to tell you about the sizes of the public and private redo threads currently active in the instance. It’s a minor variation of a script I published in Appendix D (Dumping and Debugging), page 237 to show the addresses of current activity in the various log buffers:
(more…)

August 19, 2011

Redo

Filed under: Infrastructure,Oracle,redo — Jonathan Lewis @ 2:58 am GMT Aug 19,2011

In the comments to a recent blog posting about log file syncs, Tony Hasler has produced a stunning observation about Oracle and ACID, in particular the D (durability) bit of transactions.

The observation can best be described with a demonstration (which I have run on versions from 8.1 to 11.2) involving three sessions, one of which has to be connected with sysdba privileges.

(more…)

May 27, 2011

Audit Ouch!

Filed under: audit,Bugs,Infrastructure,Oracle,redo — Jonathan Lewis @ 5:37 pm GMT May 27,2011

A few days ago I was rehearsing a presentation about how to investigate how Oracle works, and came across something surprising. Here’s a simple bit of code:
(more…)

January 3, 2011

Redo

Filed under: Infrastructure,redo — Jonathan Lewis @ 7:40 pm GMT Jan 3,2011

A couple of days ago I published a link to some comments I had made on OTN about differences in redo generation between 10g and earlier versions of Oracle. This raised a few questions that suggested a follow-up (or perhaps “prequel”) note might be a little helpful. So I’ve created a simple SQL script to help demonstrate the differences and show how some of the pieces hang together.
(more…)

December 23, 2010

Private Redo

Filed under: redo,undo — Jonathan Lewis @ 10:17 am GMT Dec 23,2010

About this time last year I wrote a short answer on OTN about Private Redo Threads and In-Memory Undo. Thanks to a follow-up question a year later I’ve been prompted to supply a link to my original answer because it was actually pretty good: OTN Thread “In Memory Undo”.

Update: If you’re looking at this note and haven’t expanded the view to see the comments, make sure that you do look at them since they include a couple of technical details I described in response to follow-up questions.

July 2, 2010

Unrecoverable

Filed under: Infrastructure,redo — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:38 pm GMT Jul 2,2010

A recent question on the OTN database forum asked: “What’s the difference between index rebuild unrecoverable and nologging?”

The most important difference, of course, is that unrecoverable is a deprecated option so you shouldn’t be using it even though it still works.
(more…)

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