Oracle Scratchpad

November 6, 2019

Table Space

Filed under: Oracle,Problem Solving — Jonathan Lewis @ 5:59 pm GMT Nov 6,2019

There’s a request on the Oracle Developer Forum for assistance to write a report that shows the total space allocation for a table – including its indexes and LOB columns. There is no requirement to allow for partitioned tables, but it’s not entirely clear whether the code should allow for index-organized tables and clustered tables, and there’s no comment about nested tables.

The OP has made an attempt to write a suitable query, but the query joins dba_tables to dba_indexes then to dba_lobs then three times to dba_segments (all the joins being outer joins) before aggregating on table name. Unsurprisingly this produces the wrong results because (for example) if a table has two indexes the join to from dba_tables to dba_indexes will double the bytes reported for the table. As Andrew Sayer points out in the thread, it would be better to aggregate on each of the separate component types before joining.

This introduces an important, generic, principle to writing code.

  • If it’s difficult to write a single statement can you break the task down into separate components that are easier to handle.
  • If you can express the problem as a small set of simpler components, can you then combine the components
  • If this approach works is any loss of efficiency balanced by a gain in clarity and maintainability.

In the case of the OP, this isn’t a query that’s going to be runing every few seconds – maybe it will be once per day, maybe three or four times per day. so there’s no 111need to be worried about making it as efficient as possible – so let’s go for simplicity.

Here’s a query that reports the space allocate for a simple heap table. It references dba_tables and dba_segments, so has to be run by a user with DBA privileges, and at the moment it’s restricted to reporting a single user.

Wait – before I write the query I ought to create a testbed to see if the query is working. So let’s take an empty schema and create a few objects. Let’s create

  • a simple heap table with two indexes and two LOB columns.
  • an Index Organized Table (IOT) with an overflow and two LOB columns.
  • a table with two columns that are a nested table type

Here’s some suitable code:


rem
rem     Script:         sum_table_space.sql
rem     Author:         Jonathan Lewis
rem     Dated:          Nov 2019
rem
rem     Last tested 
rem             19.3.0.0
rem             12.2.0.1
rem

prompt  ============================================================
prompt  Simple heap table - copy of all_objects - then add two CLOBs
prompt  ============================================================

create table test_user.t1 as select * from all_objects;

alter table test_user.t1 add (c1 clob) lob (c1) store as basicfile t1_lob1 (disable storage in row);
alter table test_user.t1 add (c2 clob) lob (c2) store as basicfile t1_lob2 (disable storage in row);

update test_user.t1 set c1 = 'x', c2 = 'x' where rownum <= 125;

create index test_user.t1_i1 on test_user.t1(object_name, object_type, object_id);
create index test_user.t1_i2 on test_user.t1(object_type, object_name, object_id);

prompt  =========================================================
prompt  Simple IOT table - with a couple of CLOBs in the overflow
prompt  =========================================================

create table test_user.iot1 (
        id              number          not null,
        ind_pad         varchar2(20)    not null,
        n2              number          not null,
        n3              number          not null,
        padding         varchar2(50),
        ct1             clob,
        ct2             clob,
        constraint iot1_pk primary key (id, ind_pad)
)
organization index
        overflow
        including n3
lob(ct1) store as basicfile iot_lob1(
        disable storage in row
)
lob(ct2) store as basicfile iot_lob2(
        disable storage in row
)
;

insert into test_user.iot1
select
        rownum,
        rpad(rownum,20),
        rownum,
        rownum,
        rpad('x',50,'x'),
        case when mod(rownum,100) = 0 then rpad('x',100,'x') end,
        case when mod(rownum,100) = 0 then rpad('x',100,'x') end
from
        all_objects
where
        rownum <= 10000
;

commit;

prompt  ====================================================
prompt  Now create types to allow creation of a nested table
prompt  ====================================================

create type test_user.jpl_item as object (n1 number, v1 varchar2(32));
/

create type test_user.jpl_tab_type as table of jpl_item;
/

create table test_user.demo_nest (
        id      number,
        nest1   test_user.jpl_tab_type,
        nest2   test_user.jpl_tab_type
)
nested table nest1 store as t_nested1
return as locator
nested table nest2 store as t_nested2
return as locator
;

create unique index test_user.tn1_pk on test_user.t_nested1(nested_table_id, n1) compress 1;
create unique index test_user.tn2_pk on test_user.t_nested2(nested_table_id, n1) compress 1;

create index  test_user.tn1_v1 on test_user.t_nested1(v1);
create index  test_user.tn2_v1 on test_user.t_nested2(v1);

insert into test_user.demo_nest values (
        1,
        test_user.jpl_tab_type(
                test_user.jpl_item(1,'Item One one'),
                test_user.jpl_item(2,'Item One two')
        ),
        test_user.jpl_tab_type(
                test_user.jpl_item(1,'Item One one'),
                test_user.jpl_item(2,'Item One two')
        )
);

insert into test_user.demo_nest values (
        2,
        test_user.jpl_tab_type(
                test_user.jpl_item(1,'Item Two one'),
                test_user.jpl_item(2,'Item Two two')
        ),
        test_user.jpl_tab_type(
                test_user.jpl_item(1,'Item Two one'),
                test_user.jpl_item(2,'Item Two two')
        )
);

commit;

You’ll notice that I’ve prefixed every table, index and type name with a schema name. This is because I set up this test to run as a DBA so I’m creating the objects while connected with a different id.

Of course, before trying to report allocations summed by base table, it would be sensible to produce a simple list of the segments we should see so that we know when we’ve reported all of them. So let’s start with that very simple report:


column bytes format 999,999,999,999
column segment_name format a25

break on report on owner on object_name skip 1
compute sum of bytes on report

select
        segment_name, segment_type, bytes
from
        dba_segments
where
        owner = 'TEST_USER'
order by
        segment_type, segment_name
;

SEGMENT_NAME              SEGMENT_TYPE                  BYTES
------------------------- ------------------ ----------------
IOT1_PK                   INDEX                     1,048,576
SYS_C008380               INDEX                     1,048,576
SYS_C008381               INDEX                     1,048,576
SYS_FK0000075579N00002$   INDEX                     1,048,576
SYS_FK0000075579N00004$   INDEX                     1,048,576
T1_I1                     INDEX                     5,242,880
T1_I2                     INDEX                     5,242,880
TN1_PK                    INDEX                     1,048,576
TN1_V1                    INDEX                     1,048,576
TN2_PK                    INDEX                     1,048,576
TN2_V1                    INDEX                     1,048,576
SYS_IL0000075565C00027$$  LOBINDEX                  1,048,576
SYS_IL0000075565C00028$$  LOBINDEX                  1,048,576
SYS_IL0000075572C00006$$  LOBINDEX                  1,048,576
SYS_IL0000075572C00007$$  LOBINDEX                  1,048,576
IOT_LOB1                  LOBSEGMENT                1,048,576
IOT_LOB2                  LOBSEGMENT                1,048,576
T1_LOB1                   LOBSEGMENT                2,097,152
T1_LOB2                   LOBSEGMENT                2,097,152
T_NESTED1                 NESTED TABLE              1,048,576
T_NESTED2                 NESTED TABLE              1,048,576
DEMO_NEST                 TABLE                     1,048,576
SYS_IOT_OVER_75572        TABLE                     1,048,576
T1                        TABLE                    12,582,912
                                             ----------------
sum                                                47,185,920

So we have a list of segments, and we have a sum of bytes to aim for. One thing you might notice, though, is that the name “IOT1”  has “disappeared”, instead the thing we see as a “TABLE” is its overflow segment, called SYS_IOT_OVER_75572 (the number being the object_id of the table we originally defined.  We will have to do something in our code to translate that sys_iot_over_75572 to iot1 if we want to make our final report easy to comprehend.

There are a few other oddities in the list, but some of them we may be familiar with already – the indexes with names like SYS_IL0000075565C00027$$ are the lob indexes for the four lobs we created. (I deliberately created basicfile LOBs in case the OP wasn’t using securefile LOBs that most systems are now using)  The 75565 in the sample here is the object_id of the base table the C00027 tells us that the LOB is column 27 of the table definition.

You may be wondering about the indexes like SYS_C008380 and SYS_FK0000075579N00002$. We may need to work on those – but I’ll tell you the answer straight away – the former is a unique index on the “nest1” column  in the demo_nest table, the latter is a “foreign key” index on the (invisible) nested_table_id column in the nested tables.

Side note: although the sys_fk0000075579N000025 index looks as if it’s supposed to be a “foreign key” index, as suggested by the name, the dependency, and the function, there’s no declared foreign key constraint declared between the parent table and the nested table. Also, if you check dba_indexes, the generated column has the value ‘N’, even though the name of the index was clearly generated by Oracle internal code.  (The index at the other end of the join – sys_c008380 – is, however, flagged with generated = ‘Y’)

Let’s start building our solution with the easiest bit.


select 
        tab.owner, 
        cast('TABLE' as varchar2(11))   object_type,
        tab.table_name,
        nvl(seg_tab.bytes,0)            bytes  
from
        dba_tables        tab  
left outer join
        dba_segments      seg_tab  
on
        seg_tab.owner      = tab.owner
and     seg_tab.table_name = tab.segment_name  
where
        tab.owner          = 'TEST_USER'
/


OWNER           OBJECT_TYPE TABLE_NAME                      BYTES
--------------- ----------- -------------------- ----------------
TEST_USER       TABLE       T1                         12,582,912
                TABLE       SYS_IOT_OVER_75572          1,048,576
                TABLE       DEMO_NEST                   1,048,576
                TABLE       IOT1                                0
***************                                  ----------------
sum                                                    14,680,064

Immediately we have to correct two problems – we can see the original Iiot1 table – but it doesn’t have an associated data segment, it has a “top”, which is the primary key index segment, and an “overflow” which is the designated by Oracle as a table segment. So we need to check the columns in dba_tables to work out how to get the more appropriate name reported for the table segment, and add a predicate to hide the original name. Here’s “tables only mark 2”:

select 
        tab.owner, 
        cast('TABLE' as varchar2(11))   object_type,
        case
                 when tab.iot_type = 'IOT_OVERFLOW' 
                        then tab.iot_name
                else tab.table_name
        end                             object_name,
        case
                 when tab.iot_type = 'IOT_OVERFLOW' 
                        then tab.table_name
        end                             auxiliary_name,
        nvl(seg_tab.bytes,0)            bytes  
from
        dba_tables        tab  
left outer join
        dba_segments      seg_tab  
on
        seg_tab.owner        = tab.owner
and     seg_tab.table_name   = tab.segment_name  
where
        tab.owner            = 'TEST_USER'
and     nvl(tab.iot_type,'NORMAL') != 'IOT'


OWNER           OBJECT_TYPE OBJECT_NAME          AUXILIARY_NAME                       BYTES
--------------- ----------- -------------------- ------------------------- ----------------
TEST_USER       TABLE       T1                                                   12,582,912
TEST_USER       TABLE       IOT1                 SYS_IOT_OVER_75572               1,048,576
TEST_USER       TABLE       DEMO_NEST                                             1,048,576

I’ve identified the table type using the iot_type column in dba_tables, hidden rows where the iot_type is ‘IOT’, and reported the iot_name (with table_name as an auxiliary name) when the iot_type is ‘IOT_OVERFLOW’. And we can now check that the result is consistent with the content of dba_segments that lists segment_type = ‘TABLE’.

So let’s move on to indexes.

select 
        ind.table_owner                 owner, 
        cast('INDEX' as varchar2(11))   object_type,
        ind.table_name,
        index_name                      auxiliary_name,
        nvl(seg_ind.bytes,0)            bytes  
from
        dba_indexes       ind  
left outer join 
        dba_segments      seg_ind  
on
        ind.owner      = seg_ind.owner
and     ind.index_name = seg_ind.segment_name  
where
        ind.table_owner = 'TEST_USER'


OWNER           OBJECT_TYPE TABLE_NAME           AUXILIARY_NAME                       BYTES
--------------- ----------- -------------------- ------------------------- ----------------
TEST_USER       INDEX       T1                   SYS_IL0000075565C00027$$         1,048,576
TEST_USER       INDEX       T1                   SYS_IL0000075565C00028$$         1,048,576
TEST_USER       INDEX       T1                   T1_I1                            5,242,880
TEST_USER       INDEX       T1                   T1_I2                            5,242,880
TEST_USER       INDEX       IOT1                 IOT1_PK                          1,048,576
TEST_USER       INDEX       IOT1                 SYS_IL0000075572C00007$$         1,048,576
TEST_USER       INDEX       IOT1                 SYS_IL0000075572C00006$$         1,048,576
TEST_USER       INDEX       T_NESTED1            SYS_FK0000075579N00002$          1,048,576
TEST_USER       INDEX       T_NESTED2            SYS_FK0000075579N00004$          1,048,576
TEST_USER       INDEX       DEMO_NEST            SYS_C008380                      1,048,576
TEST_USER       INDEX       DEMO_NEST            SYS_C008381                      1,048,576
TEST_USER       INDEX       T_NESTED1            TN1_PK                           1,048,576
TEST_USER       INDEX       T_NESTED2            TN2_PK                           1,048,576
TEST_USER       INDEX       T_NESTED1            TN1_V1                           1,048,576
TEST_USER       INDEX       T_NESTED2            TN2_V1                           1,048,576

A quick check shows that we’ve picked up the 15 indexes reported by dba_segments – although I’ve labelled them all just as “INDEX” while dba_segments does label LOB indexes differently. As you can see I’ve reported the table name in each case with the index name as the “auxiliary” name. This will be of use when I’m summing up the space associated with each table.

On to the LOBs – also easy:

select 
        lob.owner, 
        cast('LOB' as varchar2(11))   object_type,
        lob.table_name,
        lob.column_name               auxiliary_name,
        nvl(seg_lob.bytes,0)          bytes  
from
        dba_lobs    lob
left outer join 
        dba_segments      seg_lob
on
        seg_lob.owner        = lob.owner
and     seg_lob.segment_name = lob.segment_name
where 
        lob.owner            = 'TEST_USER'


OWNER           OBJECT_TYPE TABLE_NAME           AUXILIARY_NAME                       BYTES
--------------- ----------- -------------------- ------------------------- ----------------
TEST_USER       LOB         T1                   C1                               2,097,152
TEST_USER       LOB         T1                   C2                               2,097,152
TEST_USER       LOB         IOT1                 CT1                              1,048,576
TEST_USER       LOB         IOT1                 CT2                              1,048,576

And finally the nested tables:


select 
        nst.owner, 
        cast('NESTED' as varchar2(11))   object_type,
        nst.parent_table_name            object_name,
        table_name                       auxiliary_name,
        nvl(seg_nst.bytes,0)             bytes  
from
        dba_nested_tables    nst  
left outer join 
       dba_segments          seg_nst  
on
        seg_nst.owner        = nst.owner
and     seg_nst.segment_name = nst.table_name  
where
        nst.owner            = 'TEST_USER'

OWNER           OBJECT_TYPE OBJECT_NAME          AUXILIARY_NAME                       BYTES
--------------- ----------- -------------------- ------------------------- ----------------
TEST_USER       NESTED      DEMO_NEST            T_NESTED1                        1,048,576
TEST_USER       NESTED      DEMO_NEST            T_NESTED2                        1,048,576

A quick check tells us that the four pieces of code produce an exact match for all the segments reported in dba_segments – so all we have to do now is stitch the four queries together with UNION ALL, then sum(bytes) by owner and table_name.

There are 3 little problems to deal with though.

  • We have the predicate “where {owner} = ‘TEST_USER'” appearing 4 times in total, which is a bit messy. If we put this outside the UNION ALL will Oracle be smart enough to push it back inside the UNION ALL as part of its query transformation. It seems to, but the plan (which is several hundred lines long – so I’m not going to look too closely) does change a little, but on my little test system it didn’t make much difference to the performance. Initially it looks as if it might be okay to create a view from this query with no restricition on table owner, and allow users to query the view with a schema name.
  • The code to report indexes reports the indexes on the nested tables under t_nested1 and t_nested2 – we want the indexes to be associated with table demo_nest, so we need to refine that bit of the code. It needs an outer join to dba_nested_tables to supply the parent_table_name if it exists.
  • On my little system the query takes several seconds to run. Should I worry about that. Not until I’ve tested it on a much bigger system, and not until I know how frequently it needs to run. It may be good enough as it stands, and the ease with which I actually modified the first version of my code to handle the nested tables indexing issue is an indicator of the benefits of keeping a complex job as the sum of its parts if it’s reasonable to do so.

Let’s go straight to the final (so far) SQL:


select
        owner, object_name, sum(bytes) 
from    (
        select 
                tab.owner, 
                cast('TABLE' as varchar2(11))   object_type,
                case
                         when tab.iot_type = 'IOT_OVERFLOW' 
                                then tab.iot_name
                        else tab.table_name
                end                             object_name,
                case
                         when tab.iot_type = 'IOT_OVERFLOW' 
                                then tab.table_name
                end                             auxiliary_name,
                nvl(seg_tab.bytes,0)            bytes  
        from
                dba_tables        tab  
        left outer join
                dba_segments      seg_tab  
        on
                seg_tab.owner        = tab.owner
        and     seg_tab.segment_name = tab.table_name
        where
                tab.owner            = 'TEST_USER'
        and     nvl(tab.iot_type,'NORMAL') != 'IOT'
        union all
        select 
                ind.table_owner                  owner, 
                cast('INDEX' as varchar2(11))    object_type,
                nvl(
                        nst.parent_table_name,
                        ind.table_name
                )                                table_name,
                index_name                       auxiliary_name,
                nvl(seg_ind.bytes,0)             bytes  
        from
                dba_indexes       ind  
        left outer join
                dba_nested_tables nst
        on
                nst.owner       = ind.table_owner
        and     nst.table_name  = ind.table_name
        left outer join 
                dba_segments      seg_ind  
        on
                seg_ind.owner         = ind.owner
        and     seg_ind.segment_name  = ind.index_name 
        where
                ind.table_owner = 'TEST_USER'
        union all
        select 
                lob.owner, 
                cast('LOB' as varchar2(11))   object_type,
                lob.table_name,
                lob.column_name               auxiliary_name,
                nvl(seg_lob.bytes,0)          bytes  
        from
                dba_lobs    lob
        left outer join 
                dba_segments      seg_lob
        on
                seg_lob.owner        = lob.owner
        and     seg_lob.segment_name = lob.segment_name
        where 
                lob.owner            = 'TEST_USER'
        union all
        select 
                nst.owner, 
                cast('NESTED' as varchar2(11))   object_type,
                nst.parent_table_name            object_name,
                table_name                       auxiliary_name,
                nvl(seg_nst.bytes,0)             bytes  
        from
                dba_nested_tables    nst  
        left outer join 
               dba_segments          seg_nst  
        on
                seg_nst.owner        = nst.owner
        and     seg_nst.segment_name = nst.table_name
        where
                nst.owner         = 'TEST_USER'
        )
where
        owner = 'TEST_USER'
group by
        owner, object_name
order by
        sum(bytes)
/

OWNER           OBJECT_NAME                SUM(BYTES)
--------------- -------------------- ----------------
TEST_USER       IOT1                        6,291,456
TEST_USER       DEMO_NEST                  11,534,336
TEST_USER       T1                         29,360,128
                                     ----------------
sum                                        47,185,920


I wrote this note because my response to the original query was an informal suggestion of taking this approach; then I thought it might be worth writing a general comment about solving big problems by starting with little problems and stitching the pieces together using this case as a concrete example – then I just went ahead to finish the thing off within the bourndaries of the original requirements.

There’s a reason, though, why I tend to avoid publishing SQL that might be useful – it’s always possible to overlook bits and end up with people trying to use code that’s not totally appropriate to their system. In this case, of course, there’s a total (but deliberate) failure to handle clusters, partitions and subpartitions, but I don’t know how many other of the “less commonly used” bits of Otacle I haven’t considered. I do know that I haven’t touched on domain indexes (such as text indexes with all their convoluted collections of tables and indexes) but there may be some oddities of (e.g.) advanced queueing, replication, and audit vault that fall outside the range of the possibilities I’ve covered above.

Update 7th Nov 2019

The OP from OTN reported seeing some nested table in the output – which I thought I’d catered for so I modified the code I have on my sandbox to add a nested table to the IOT, and added a couple of extra indexes on the parent of the nested table, changed a couple of columns and object names to quoted mixed case, and everything still seemed to work okay.

It turned out that the OP had nested tables that were nested 5 deep – which means I need a hierarchical query to connect the 2nd to 5th (or nth) layer of nesting back to the parent to report the total volume against the top level table. In order to deal with this problem I modified the query in the smallest possible way.

I had two references to the view dba_nested_tables, so I created a hierarchical query based on dba_nested_tables that returned the “oldest ancestor” with each child table rather than the immediate parent. (I’ve written a separate note showing the derivation and testing). Then I turned this query into a “with subquery” (CTE) called top_nested_tables and changed the two calls that the main query made to dba_nested_tables  so that they referenced the CTE instead:


with my_nested_tables as (
select
        /*+ materialize */
        owner, parent_table_name, table_name
from
        dba_nested_tables
where   owner = 'TEST_USER'
),
top_nested_tables as (                                                             -- ***** Replacement CTE defined
select  /*+ materialize */
        owner, parent_table parent_table_name, table_name
from    (
        select
                owner,
                level,
                connect_by_root parent_table_name parent_table,
                table_name 
        from
                my_nested_tables
        connect by
                parent_table_name = prior table_name
        )
where   (owner, parent_table) not in (
                select owner, table_name
                from   my_nested_tables
        )
)
select                                                                             -- ***** Main select
        owner, object_name, sum(bytes)  total_bytes
from    (
        select 
                tab.owner, 
                cast('TABLE' as varchar2(11))   object_type,
                case
                         when tab.iot_type = 'IOT_OVERFLOW' 
                                then tab.iot_name
                        else tab.table_name
                end                             object_name,
                case
                         when tab.iot_type = 'IOT_OVERFLOW' 
                                then tab.table_name
                end                             auxiliary_name,
                nvl(seg_tab.bytes,0)            bytes  
        from
                dba_tables        tab  
        left outer join
                dba_segments      seg_tab  
        on
                seg_tab.owner        = tab.owner
        and     seg_tab.segment_name = tab.table_name
        where
                tab.owner            = 'TEST_USER'
        and     nvl(tab.iot_type,'NORMAL') != 'IOT'
        union all
        select 
                ind.table_owner                  owner, 
                cast('INDEX' as varchar2(11))    object_type,
                nvl(
                        nst.parent_table_name,
                        ind.table_name
                )                                table_name,
                index_name                       auxiliary_name,
                nvl(seg_ind.bytes,0)             bytes  
        from
                dba_indexes       ind  
        left outer join
                top_nested_tables nst                                              -- ***** view replacement 
        on
                nst.owner       = ind.table_owner
        and     nst.table_name  = ind.table_name
        left outer join 
                dba_segments      seg_ind  
        on
                seg_ind.owner         = ind.owner
        and     seg_ind.segment_name  = ind.index_name 
        where
                ind.table_owner = 'TEST_USER'
        union all
        select 
                lob.owner, 
                cast('LOB' as varchar2(11))   object_type,
                lob.table_name,
                lob.column_name               auxiliary_name,
                nvl(seg_lob.bytes,0)          bytes  
        from
                dba_lobs    lob
        left outer join 
                dba_segments      seg_lob
        on
                seg_lob.owner        = lob.owner
        and     seg_lob.segment_name = lob.segment_name
        where 
                lob.owner            = 'TEST_USER'
        union all
        select 
                nst.owner, 
                cast('NESTED' as varchar2(11))   object_type,
                nst.parent_table_name            object_name,
                table_name                       auxiliary_name,
                nvl(seg_nst.bytes,0)             bytes  
        from
                top_nested_tables nst                                              -- ***** view replacement 
        left outer join 
                dba_segments          seg_nst  
        on
                seg_nst.owner        = nst.owner
        and     seg_nst.segment_name = nst.table_name
        where
                nst.owner         = 'TEST_USER'
        )
where
        owner = 'TEST_USER'
group by
        owner, object_name
order by
        sum(bytes)
;

If you followed the link to the original Oracle Developer Forum thread you’ll see that the OP has made much more use of the “with subquery” (CTS) construct, – including a rather nice touch of having a CTE that reads “select cast(‘MY_SCHEMA’ as varchar2(30)) from dual” – this is particularly cute because it means you only have to supply a fixed schema name once in the query rather than having to repeat it several times in the course of the query because you can then inject the scemaname everywhere else as needed by a join to the CTE.

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