Oracle Scratchpad

May 4, 2014

Extended stats

Filed under: 12c,extended stats,Histograms,Oracle,Statistics — Jonathan Lewis @ 1:24 pm GMT May 4,2014

Like the recent article on deleting histograms this is another draft that I rediscovered while searching for some notes I had written on a different topic – so I’ve finally finished it off and published it.

Here’s a quirky little detail of extended stats that came up in an OTN thread earlier on this week [ed: actually 8th Jan 2014]. When you create column group stats, Oracle uses an undocumented function sys_op_combined_hash() to create a hash value, and if you gather simple stats on the column (i.e. no histogram) you can get some idea of the range of values that Oracle generates through the hash function. For example:


create table t1 as
select  1 n1, 2 n2
from dual
connect by level<=5000
union all
select  2, 1
from dual
connect by level<=5000 ; 
 
select dbms_stats.create_extended_stats(user,'t1','(n1, n2)') name from dual; 

begin 
	dbms_stats.gather_table_stats( 
		ownname		=> user,
		tabname		=>'T1',
		method_opt	=> 'for all columns size 1'
	);
end;
/

break on column_name skip 1

column column_name format a32
column endpoint_number heading "EP No."
column endpoint_value  heading "Value" format 999,999,999,999,999,999,999

select
	column_name, endpoint_number, endpoint_value
from
	user_tab_histograms
where
	table_name = 'T1'
order by
	column_name, endpoint_value
;

COLUMN_NAME                          EP No.                        Value
-------------------------------- ---------- ----------------------------
N1                                        0                            1
                                          1                            2

N2                                        0                            1
                                          1                            2

SYS_STUBZH0IHA7K$KEBJVXO5LOHAS            0      298,332,787,864,733,000
                                          1    8,095,781,421,167,520,000

I could have selected low_value and high_value from user_tab_cols, using utl_raw.cast_to_number() to display them in numeric format, but the view user_tab_histograms display the low and high as a two-bucket histogram if there is no actual histogram data for the column in the histogram (histgrm$) table.

We probably don’t need to worry about what the low and high values might be because taking hash values destroys any meaning that a range might have (the optimizer can’t use column group stats in range-based predicates, only in equality predicates). However, we might collect a frequency histogram (or Top-N histogram in 12c) on the column group because there might be some data skew in the sets of values that we need to tell the optimizer about – so let’s gather a histogram with 2 buckets on our sample data set and see what we get:


begin
	dbms_stats.gather_table_stats(
		ownname		 => user,
		tabname		 =>'T1',
		method_opt 	 => 'for all columns size 2'
	);
end;
/

select
	column_name, endpoint_number, endpoint_value
from
	user_tab_histograms
where
	table_name = 'T1'
order by
	column_name, endpoint_value
;

COLUMN_NAME                          EP No.                        Value
-------------------------------- ---------- ----------------------------
N1                                     5000                            1
                                      10000                            2

N2                                     5000                            1
                                      10000                            2

SYS_STUBZH0IHA7K$KEBJVXO5LOHAS         5000                1,977,102,303
                                      10000                7,894,566,276

The histogram values have changed! As one of the posters on the OTN thread points out, what Oracle has actually stored in this case is mod(sys_op_combined_hash() ,9999999999).

So far I haven’t done any exhaustive testing to work out whether the change in the strategy for storing numbers makes any difference to the typical optimizer arithmetic – but I do have at least one case (relating to “missing values” behaviour where the presence or absence of a column group histogram does make a difference to the estimated cardinality in a way that seems inconsistent with other patterns of behaviour: I doubt if it’s actually due to the change in what’s stored, and one day I may come across a client where I actually need to work out what’s going on and how best to work with the anomaly.

Bonus thought:

In 12c Oracle collects column stats automatically as it loads data into an empty table; but not if it’s got extended stats defined on it.  (This is bug number 18425876, labelled as fixed in 12.2 [ed: actually fixed in 12.1.0.2]). Here’s some code modelling a client scenario where we truncate and reload a table every day. In the first part of the demonstration I’ve loaded the table twice to show that after truncating and reloading I get new stats on the table – the first load is 10,000 rows, the second is 20,000 rows and the stats reflect this automatically. In the second part of the code, after adding a set of column group stats, truncating and loading 5,000 rows, the stats from the previous cycle are still in place. (The code is only relevant to 12c, of course)

create table t1 (n1 number, n2 number);

insert	/*+ append */
into	t1
select	object_id, data_object_id
from	all_objects
where
	rownum <= 10000
;
commit;

-- stats have appeared without a call to dbms_stats to gather them.

select blocks, num_rows from user_tables where table_name = 'T1';
select column_name, num_distinct, num_nulls, density, low_value, high_value from user_tab_cols where table_name = 'T1';

truncate table t1;

insert	/*+ append */
into	t1
select	object_id, data_object_id
from	all_objects
where
	rownum <= 20000
;
commit;

-- Stats now show the latest data 

select blocks, num_rows from user_tables where table_name = 'T1';
select column_name, num_distinct, num_nulls, density, low_value, high_value from user_tab_cols where table_name = 'T1';

-- Add a column group to the stats 

select dbms_stats.create_extended_stats(user,'t1','(n1, n2)') name from dual;

truncate table t1;

insert	/*+ append */
into	t1
select	object_id, data_object_id
from	all_objects
where
	rownum <= 5000
;
commit;

-- The stats have not been updated to reflect the new data, and the column group stats are empty

select blocks, num_rows from user_tables where table_name = 'T1';
select column_name, num_distinct, num_nulls, density, low_value, high_value from user_tab_cols where table_name = 'T1';

--------------------------------------------------------
-- Here are the three consecutive sets of results
--------------------------------------------------------

    BLOCKS   NUM_ROWS
---------- ----------
        16      10000

COLUMN_NAME                      NUM_DISTINCT  NUM_NULLS    DENSITY LOW_VALUE                  HIGH_VALUE
-------------------------------- ------------ ---------- ---------- -------------------------- --------------------------
N1                                      10000          0      .0001 C103                       C3020C60
N2                                       2534       7429 .000394633 C103                       C30B2929

    BLOCKS   NUM_ROWS
---------- ----------
        32      20000

COLUMN_NAME                      NUM_DISTINCT  NUM_NULLS    DENSITY LOW_VALUE                  HIGH_VALUE
-------------------------------- ------------ ---------- ---------- -------------------------- --------------------------
N1                                      20000          0     .00005 C103                       C30A4553
N2                                       3115      16848 .000321027 C103                       C30B2929

    BLOCKS   NUM_ROWS
---------- ----------
        32      20000

COLUMN_NAME                      NUM_DISTINCT  NUM_NULLS    DENSITY LOW_VALUE                  HIGH_VALUE
-------------------------------- ------------ ---------- ---------- -------------------------- --------------------------
N1                                      20000          0     .00005 C103                       C30A4553
N2                                       3115      16848 .000321027 C103                       C30B2929
SYS_STUBZH0IHA7K$KEBJVXO5LOHAS

The workaround given in the bug is “add the extended stats after loading the table” – but if you’re constantly truncating and reloading that means you have to drop and add the extended stats and do a tablescan to gather the column group stats every time you reload.

Note: the limitation applies whether you create a column group, “ordinary” extended stats, a virtual column, or an implicit virtual column underlying a function-based index.

Just as a little aside – when I first wrote the demo script I forgot to put in the commit; after the insert/append – which meant I was trying to create column group stats on a table which should have given me Oracle error: “ORA-12838: cannot read/modify an object after modifying it in parallel”; instead this has been trapped by the dbms_stats package and shows up as a slightly confusing:


select dbms_stats.create_extended_stats(user,'t1','(n1, n2)') name from dual
       *
ERROR at line 1:
ORA-20001: Error when processing extension -  resource busy and acquire with NOWAIT specified or timeout expired
ORA-06512: at "SYS.DBMS_STATS", line 12977
ORA-06512: at "SYS.DBMS_STATS", line 44967
ORA-06512: at "SYS.DBMS_STATS", line 44986

May 1, 2014

Delete Histogram

Filed under: Histograms,Oracle,Statistics — Jonathan Lewis @ 1:27 pm GMT May 1,2014

Here’s a note that I drafted in November 2010, then didn’t publish. I found it earlier on this morning while looking for another note I’d written about histograms so, even though it may not be something that people need so much these days, I thought: better late than never.

I’ve pointed out in the past that I’m not keen on seeing lots of histograms on a system and tend to delete them if I think they are not needed. Here’s an example of the type of code I use to delete a histogram.

declare

	srec			dbms_stats.statrec;
	m_distcnt		number;
	m_density		number;
	m_nullcnt		number;
	m_avgclen		number;

	n_array                 dbms_stats.numarray;

begin

	dbms_stats.get_column_stats(
		ownname		=> user,
		tabname		=> 't1',
		colname		=> 'n1',
		distcnt		=> m_distcnt,
		density		=> m_density,
		nullcnt		=> m_nullcnt,
		srec		=> srec,
		avgclen		=> m_avgclen
	); 

	srec.bkvals := null;
	srec.novals :=	dbms_stats.numarray(
				utl_raw.cast_to_number(srec.minval),
				utl_raw.cast_to_number(srec.maxval)
			);
	srec.epc := 2;
	dbms_stats.prepare_column_values(srec, srec.novals);

	m_density := 1/m_distcnt;

	dbms_stats.set_column_stats(
		ownname		=> user,
		tabname		=> 't1',
		colname		=> 'n1',
		distcnt		=> m_distcnt,
		density		=> m_density,
		nullcnt		=> m_nullcnt,
		srec		=> srec,
		avgclen		=> m_avgclen
	); 

exception
	when others then
		raise;		-- should handle div/0

end;
/

The code basically reads the column stats, resets the histogram figures to just the low and high values for the column, setting the endpoint-count to two, then adjusts the density to the standard for a column with no histogram. This specific example is for a numeric column.

Footnote: my preferred method of collecting statistics is to use method_opt => ‘for all columns size 1’ (i.e. no histograms) and then run scripts to create the histograms I want. This means that after any stats collection I need to run code that checks to see which tables have new stats, and then re-run any histogram code that I’ve written for that table.

To move from Oracle’s default histogram collection to this strategy, you could start by switching to method_opt => ‘for all columns size repeat’ (i.e. recreate existing histograms, don’t create new ones), then simply delete histograms as you find that you don’t need them, and introduce scripts to recreate the histograms that you do need. When you’ve finally got to the point where every histogram is scripted you can then switch to method_opt => ‘for all columns size 1’.

 Footnote 2: Since 2010 when I drafted this note Oracle 12c has launched, and the changes it has introduced for frequency and Top-N histograms means that I’m far less stringent in my demand that if a histogram is worth having it’s better to write code to create it. There’s a series of three articles about 12c histograms in particular at this link.

March 2, 2014

Auto Sample Size

Filed under: Function based indexes,Indexing,Infrastructure,IOT,LOBs,Oracle,Statistics — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:38 pm GMT Mar 2,2014

In the past I have enthused mightily about the benefits of the approximate NDV mechanism and the benefit of using auto_sample_size to collect statistics in 11g; however, as so often happens with Oracle features, there’s a down-side or boundary condition, or edge case. I’ve already picked this up once as an addendum to an earlier blog note on virtual stats, which linked to an article on OTN describing how the time taken to collect stats on a table increased dramatically after the addition of an index – where the index had this definition:


create bitmap index i_s_rmp_eval_csc_msg_actions on
    s_rmp_evaluation_csc_message (
        decode(instr(xml_message_text,' '),0,0,1)
    )
;

As you might guess from the column name, this is an index based on an XML column, which is stored as a CLOB.

In a similar vein, I showed you a few days ago an old example I had of indexing a CLOB column with a call to dbms_lob.getlength(). Both index examples suffer from the same problem – to support the index Oracle creates a hidden (virtual) column on the table that can be used to hold statistics about the values of the function; actual calculated values for the function call are stored in the index but not on the table itself – but it’s important that the optimizer has the statistics about the non-existent column values.

(more…)

December 9, 2013

Bitmap join indexes

Filed under: Indexing,Oracle,Statistics — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:01 pm GMT Dec 9,2013

Here’s another of my “draft” notes that needs some expansion and, most importantly, proof.

I have a fact table with a status id column that shows a massive skew. But I also have a dimension table that holds the “status code” so (in theory, at least) I have to do a join from the statuses table to the facts table to find rows of a given status. Unfortunately the join hides the skew:

(more…)

October 9, 2013

12c Histograms pt.3

Filed under: 12c,Histograms,Oracle,Statistics — Jonathan Lewis @ 8:13 pm GMT Oct 9,2013

It has taken much longer than I anticipated to get around to writing part 3 of this mini-series on what Oracle has done about histograms in 12c.
In part 1 I gave a thumbnail sketch of the three types of histogram available in 12c
In part 2 I described in some detail the improvements in performance and accuracy for the frequency and top-frequency histograms

In part 3 of this mini-series I’ll be describing how the implementation of the “hybrid” histogram that Oracle produces if the “approximate NDV” mechanism has been enabled and you’ve left the estimate_percent to auto_sample_size. There is little difference between the work needed to create a hybrid histogram and the work needed to generate the old “height-balanced” histogram, but the degree of information captured by the hybrid is much greater than that of the height-balanced.

(more…)

September 27, 2013

Virtual Stats

Filed under: CBO,Execution plans,Oracle,Statistics — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:49 am GMT Sep 27,2013

Or – to be more accurate – real statistics on a virtual column.

This is one of the “10 top tips” that I came up with for my session with Maria Colgan at OOW13. A method of giving more information that might improve execution plans when you can’t change the code. I’ll start with a small data set including a virtual column (running 11.1.0.7), and a couple of problem queries:
(more…)

September 25, 2013

Extended Stats

Filed under: CBO,extended stats,Oracle,Statistics — Jonathan Lewis @ 5:06 pm GMT Sep 25,2013

Here’s a little demo cut-n-pasted from a session running Oracle 12.1.0.1 (it works on 11g, too). All it does is create a table by copying from a well-known table, gather extended stats on a column group, then show you the resulting column names by querying view user_tab_cols.

(more…)

September 1, 2013

Histograms

Filed under: Histograms,Oracle,Statistics — Jonathan Lewis @ 9:41 am GMT Sep 1,2013

A three-part series on histograms up to and including 11g – written for Allthings Oracle. With Chinese transalation:

And a three part series on histograms in 12c on this blog

A short video recorded at RMOUG 2013 about the improvements in Oracle’s histogram mechanisms as you upgrade from 11g to 12c.

Update (Jan 2016):

A pair of articles by Mohamed Houri, published on allthingsoracle.com adding discussing details of the mechanisms and selectivity calculations for 12c histograms:

 

 

August 19, 2013

Distributed Queries – 3

Filed under: distributed,Histograms,Oracle — Jonathan Lewis @ 7:25 am GMT Aug 19,2013

A comment I’ve made many times in the past about distributed queries is that Oracle doesn’t try to retrieve histogram information from remote databases when optimizing a query. Checking back through previous posts, though, I don’t think I’ve ever mentioned it on the blog – so here’s an example demonstrating the point.

(more…)

August 15, 2013

MV Refresh

Filed under: Bugs,CBO,Infrastructure,Materialized view,Oracle,Statistics — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:12 pm GMT Aug 15,2013

Here’s a funny little problem I came across some time ago when setting up some materialized views. I have two tables, orders and order_lines, and I’ve set up materialized view logs for them that allow a join materialized view (called orders_join) to be fast refreshable. Watch what happens if I refresh this view just before gathering stats on the order_lines table.

(more…)

July 30, 2013

12c Histograms pt.2

Filed under: 12c,Histograms,Oracle,Statistics — Jonathan Lewis @ 9:00 pm GMT Jul 30,2013

In part 2 of this mini-series I’ll be describing the new mechanism for the simple frequency histogram and the logic of the Top-N frequency histogram. In part 3 I’ll be looking at the new hybrid histogram.

You need to know about the approximate NDV before you start examining the 12c implementation of the frequency and top-frequency histograms – but there’s a thumbnail sketch at the end of the posting if you need a quick reminder.

(more…)

July 24, 2013

Linear Decay

Filed under: CBO,Oracle,Statistics — Jonathan Lewis @ 6:11 pm GMT Jul 24,2013

I’ve mentioned “linear decay” in several posts when explaining a problem that someone has seen with an execution path – but I’ve recently realised that I don’t have a post describing what it is and how it works – although it’s in Cost Based Oracle – Fundamentals, of course, if you want some detail – so here’s a brief introduction (based on simple stats with no histograms).

(more…)

July 14, 2013

12c histograms

Filed under: 12c,Histograms,Oracle,Statistics — Jonathan Lewis @ 7:11 pm GMT Jul 14,2013

There are a few enhancements in 12c that might make a big difference to performance for a small investment in effort. One of the important enhancements comes from changes in histograms – which improve speed of collection with accuracy of results. The changes are so significant that I chose the topic as my presentation at OpenWorld last year.

(more…)

July 7, 2013

Cursor Sharing

Filed under: CBO,Oracle,Statistics,trace files — Jonathan Lewis @ 5:49 pm GMT Jul 7,2013

Here’s a couple of extracts from a trace file after I’ve set optimizer_dynamic_sampling to level 3. I’ve run two, very similar, SQL statements that both require dynamic sampling according to the rules for the parameter – but take a look at the different ways that sampling has happened, and ask yourself what’s going on:

(more…)

July 5, 2013

Wrong Index

Filed under: Indexing,Oracle,Statistics — Jonathan Lewis @ 8:00 pm GMT Jul 5,2013

One of the sad things about trying to keep on top of Oracle is that there are so many little things that could go wrong and take a long time to identify. In part this is why I try to accumulate test cases for all the oddities and anomalies I come across as I travel around the world – if I’ve spent the time recreating a problem I’ll probably remember it the next time I see the symptoms.

(more…)

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