Oracle Scratchpad

December 21, 2015

Parallel Plans

Filed under: 12c,Oracle,Parallel Execution — Jonathan Lewis @ 8:40 am GMT Dec 21,2015

This article was prompted by a pair of articles by Yasin Baskan of Oracle Corporation: PX Server Sets etc. and Multiple Parallelizers, plus a little extra prompting from a mistake that I made when reading the second of those two articles. The fact that I made a mistake is significant because, without it, I wouldn’t have created a model to check Yasin’s description of the parallel activity.

I want to examine the following query to find out the order of activity:


select
        distinct t1.n1
from
        t1
where 
        t1.n1 >= 500
and     t1.n2 > (select avg(t2.n2) from t2)
and     t1.n3 > (select avg(t3.n3) from t3)
;

I’m going to be using 12.1.0.2 for this demonstration (lots of changes appear in parallel execution as you move from 11g to 12c, so the version is most significant), with all default settings for the parallel-related parameters.

To get things started, here’s the code to generate the data that I used, and the serial execution plan:


create table t1 nologging as
with generator as (
        select  --+ materialize
                rownum id
        from dual
        connect by
                level <= 1e4
)
select
        rownum                  id,
        mod(rownum,1000)        n1,
        rownum                  n2,
        rownum                  n3,
        lpad(rownum,10)         small_vc,
        rpad('x',100,'x')       padding
from
        generator       v1,
        generator       v2
where
        rownum <= 2e4
;

create table t2 nologging as
with generator as ( 
        select  --+ materialize
                rownum id
        from dual 
        connect by 
                level <= 1e4
)
select
        rownum                  n1,
        rownum                  n2,
        rownum                  n3,
        lpad(rownum,10)         small_vc,
        rpad('x',100,'x')       padding
from
        generator       v1,
        generator       v2
where
        rownum <= 2e4
;

create table t3 nologging as
with generator as ( 
        select  --+ materialize
                rownum id
        from dual 
        connect by 
                level <= 1e4
)
select
        rownum                  n1,
        rownum                  n2,
        rownum                  n3,
        lpad(rownum,10)         small_vc,
        rpad('x',100,'x')       padding
from
        generator       v1,
        generator       v2
where
        rownum <= 2e4 ;

-- don't need to gather stats as they are generated on CTAS in 12c.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation            | Name | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT     |      |       |       |   150 (100)|          |
|   1 |  HASH UNIQUE         |      |    24 |   336 |   150   (4)| 00:00:01 |
|*  2 |   TABLE ACCESS FULL  | T1   |    25 |   350 |    51   (4)| 00:00:01 |
|   3 |    SORT AGGREGATE    |      |     1 |     5 |            |          |
|   4 |     TABLE ACCESS FULL| T2   | 20000 |    97K|    49   (3)| 00:00:01 |
|   5 |    SORT AGGREGATE    |      |     1 |     5 |            |          |
|   6 |     TABLE ACCESS FULL| T3   | 20000 |    97K|    49   (3)| 00:00:01 |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------
   2 - filter(("T1"."N1">=500 AND "T1"."N2"> AND "T1"."N3">))

I’ve pulled the execution plan from memory using dbms_xplan.display_cursor(), which is why the predicate section shows the odd comparison of “t2.n2 > {nothing there}” and “t3.n3 > {nothing there}”. The predicate section produced by a simple call to explain plan would help us to fill in the details:


Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------
   2 - filter("T1"."N1">=500 AND "T1"."N2"> (SELECT AVG("T2"."N2") FROM
              "T2" "T2") AND "T1"."N3"> (SELECT AVG("T3"."N3") FROM "T3" "T3"))

We can infer from the predicate section that Oracle executes the t2 subquery first and the t3 subquery second; but there is a slight oddity in the shape of the execution plan if we apply the “first child first / recursive descent” approach to reading the plan. It looks as if operations 3 and 5 are children of line 2 and should be run before child 2. This is the consequence of “subquery pushing”. In fact the subqueries are both filter subqueries and, in principle (and ignoring scalar subquery caching for the moment), they will be run once for each row produced from the tablescan of operation 2.

The activity is as follows:

  • start scanning table t1
  • when the first row appears where n1 >= 500 run the subquery against t2 to derive the average of t2.n2 (10000.5) and check to see if the n2 value of the current t1 row exceeds that value (it doesn’t);
  • continue scanning t1 checking for rows where n1 >= 500 and n2 >= 10000.5 (no need to rerun the subquery thanks to scalar subquery caching),
  • on finding the first row matching both predicates run the subquery against t3 to derive the average of t3.n3 (10000.5) and check to see if the n3 value of the current t1 row exceeds that value.
  • continue the scan of t1 checking for rows where n1 >= 500 and n2 >= 10000.5 and n3 >= 10000.5 (again scalar subquery caching means no further executions of either subquery).

We can add weight to the argument that this is the order of activity by flushing the buffer cache and enabled the extended trace before running the query.  Here’s a section of a trace file that demonstrates the point – with no edits beyond the insertion of a few blank lines:


PARSE #140345652175312:c=1000,e=1813,p=0,cr=0,cu=0,mis=1,r=0,dep=0,og=1,plh=115251305,tim=134216063372
EXEC #140345652175312:c=0,e=62,p=0,cr=0,cu=0,mis=0,r=0,dep=0,og=1,plh=115251305,tim=134216063544
WAIT #140345652175312: nam='SQL*Net message to client' ela= 3 driver id=1650815232 #bytes=1 p3=0 obj#=-1 tim=134216063569
WAIT #140345652175312: nam='db file sequential read' ela= 9 file#=5 block#=131 blocks=1 obj#=133974 tim=134216063627
WAIT #140345652175312: nam='db file scattered read' ela= 315 file#=5 block#=132 blocks=112 obj#=133974 tim=134216064187

WAIT #140345652175312: nam='db file sequential read' ela= 9 file#=5 block#=515 blocks=1 obj#=133975 tim=134216064438
WAIT #140345652175312: nam='db file scattered read' ela= 115 file#=5 block#=516 blocks=112 obj#=133975 tim=134216064732
WAIT #140345652175312: nam='db file scattered read' ela= 18 file#=5 block#=628 blocks=12 obj#=133975 tim=134216066046
WAIT #140345652175312: nam='db file scattered read' ela= 123 file#=5 block#=642 blocks=112 obj#=133975 tim=134216066548
WAIT #140345652175312: nam='db file scattered read' ela= 20 file#=5 block#=754 blocks=14 obj#=133975 tim=134216067760
WAIT #140345652175312: nam='db file scattered read' ela= 124 file#=5 block#=770 blocks=112 obj#=133975 tim=134216068153
WAIT #140345652175312: nam='db file scattered read' ela= 8 file#=5 block#=882 blocks=2 obj#=133975 tim=134216069677

WAIT #140345652175312: nam='db file scattered read' ela= 18 file#=5 block#=244 blocks=12 obj#=133974 tim=134216070049
WAIT #140345652175312: nam='db file scattered read' ela= 127 file#=5 block#=258 blocks=112 obj#=133974 tim=134216070382

WAIT #140345652175312: nam='db file sequential read' ela= 6 file#=5 block#=899 blocks=1 obj#=133976 tim=134216070812
WAIT #140345652175312: nam='db file scattered read' ela= 41 file#=5 block#=900 blocks=112 obj#=133976 tim=134216071028
WAIT #140345652175312: nam='db file scattered read' ela= 42 file#=5 block#=1012 blocks=12 obj#=133976 tim=134216072956
WAIT #140345652175312: nam='db file scattered read' ela= 215 file#=5 block#=1026 blocks=112 obj#=133976 tim=134216073642
WAIT #140345652175312: nam='db file scattered read' ela= 29 file#=5 block#=1138 blocks=14 obj#=133976 tim=134216076334
WAIT #140345652175312: nam='db file scattered read' ela= 154 file#=5 block#=1154 blocks=112 obj#=133976 tim=134216076825
WAIT #140345652175312: nam='db file scattered read' ela= 14 file#=5 block#=1266 blocks=2 obj#=133976 tim=134216081673

WAIT #140345652175312: nam='db file scattered read' ela= 24 file#=5 block#=370 blocks=14 obj#=133974 tim=134216082815
WAIT #140345652175312: nam='db file scattered read' ela= 144 file#=5 block#=386 blocks=112 obj#=133974 tim=134216083232
WAIT #140345652175312: nam='db file scattered read' ela= 20 file#=5 block#=498 blocks=12 obj#=133974 tim=134216084494

FETCH #140345652175312:c=16998,e=21096,p=1105,cr=1111,cu=0,mis=0,r=1,dep=0,og=1,plh=115251305,tim=134216084683

Object 133974 is table t1, object 133975 is table t2, and object 133976 is table t3.

As you can see, we start by scanning t1, then we scan t2 once, then we scan more of t1, then we scan t3 once, then we finish off scanning t1.

We could chase the detail a little further, of course – we could check the session statistics to make sure that we haven’t been using the buffer cache to scan t2 and t3 repeatedly, or we could enable rowsource execution statistics to report the number of times each operation started, or we could check the STAT# lines dumped a little later in the trace files and infer that the t2 and t3 tablescans happened just once each.

At this point I’ll mention my mistake: when I originally read Yasin’s version of the parallel equivalent of this plan my first thought was that the subquery sections of the plan operate from the bottom upwards (i.e. another one of those examples where “first child first” doesn’t apply) whereas Yasin described them as running top down. I was wrong – I was thinking of the case where the optimizer analyses the query from the bottom up, but it still produces a plan that then runs from the top down – but I didn’t realize my mistake until after I’d been poking around with the parallel version of the query and had made a surprising discovery.

Parallel Execution

So what happens when we manipulate this query into parallelism ? To make it a little easier to see some of the details I’ve added hints to each query block to use a different degree of parallelism; and then, because it all happens so fast, I’ve introduced a function call to slow down the progress of the query. Here’s the function I’ve created (you’ll find it elsewhere on blog) and the final query I started testing with:


create or replace function wait_row (
        i_secs  number,
        i_return        number
) return number
parallel_enable
is
begin
        dbms_lock.sleep(i_secs);
        return i_return;
end;
/


select
        /*+ parallel(t1,5) tracking */ 
        distinct t1.n1
from
        t1
where   
        wait_row(0.01,t1.n2) > (select /*+ parallel(t2,3) */ avg(wait_row(0.01,t2.n2)) from t2)
and     wait_row(0.01,t1.n3) > (select /*+ parallel(t3,2) */ avg(wait_row(0.01,t3.n3)) from t3)
and     t1.n1 >= 1000
--      and     wait_row(0.01, t1.n1) >= 500
;

The wait_row() function simply waits for the number of seconds given in the first parameter then returns the (numeric) value of the second parameter. It calls the dbms_lock.sleep() function which has a granularity of 1/100th of a second, and since I’m planning to use it in a parallel query I’ve included the parallel_enable declaration.

Since the function has not been declared deterministic, or assigned to the pl/sql result cache, and since there are 20,000 rows in the t2 table the time to run the t2 subquery will be roughly 20,000 * 0.01 seconds, which (ignoring parallelism) would be about 200 seconds. I’ve actually hinted DOP = 3 for that subquery so I hope it will complete in about 70 seconds, and the subquery against t3 with hinted DOP = 2 should complete in about 100 seconds.

You’ll notice I have two possible predicates against t1 – the one shown uncommented here doesn’t use call the wait_row() function, the other does. Here’s an interesting point, though, about the example that doesn’t call wait_row() – the simple predicate is going to eliminate ALL the data from t1, there are no rows where n1 >= 1000 and that’s an important point to remember.

Here’s the execution plan:


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                      | Name     | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |    TQ  |IN-OUT| PQ Distrib |
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT               |          |       |       |    57 (100)|          |        |      |            |
|   1 |  PX COORDINATOR                |          |       |       |            |          |        |      |            |
|   2 |   PX SEND QC (RANDOM)          | :TQ30001 |     1 |    14 |    57   (4)| 00:00:01 |  Q3,01 | P->S | QC (RAND)  |
|   3 |    HASH UNIQUE                 |          |     1 |    14 |    57   (4)| 00:00:01 |  Q3,01 | PCWP |            |
|   4 |     PX RECEIVE                 |          |     1 |    14 |    57   (4)| 00:00:01 |  Q3,01 | PCWP |            |
|   5 |      PX SEND HASH              | :TQ30000 |     1 |    14 |    57   (4)| 00:00:01 |  Q3,00 | P->P | HASH       |
|   6 |       HASH UNIQUE              |          |     1 |    14 |    57   (4)| 00:00:01 |  Q3,00 | PCWP |            |
|   7 |        PX BLOCK ITERATOR       |          |     1 |    14 |    11   (0)| 00:00:01 |  Q3,00 | PCWC |            |
|*  8 |         TABLE ACCESS FULL      | T1       |     1 |    14 |    11   (0)| 00:00:01 |  Q3,00 | PCWP |            |
|   9 |          SORT AGGREGATE        |          |     1 |     5 |            |          |  Q3,00 | PCWP |            |
|  10 |           PX COORDINATOR       |          |       |       |            |          |        |      |            |
|  11 |            PX SEND QC (RANDOM) | :TQ10000 |     1 |     5 |            |          |  Q1,00 | P->S | QC (RAND)  |
|  12 |             SORT AGGREGATE     |          |     1 |     5 |            |          |  Q1,00 | PCWP |            |
|  13 |              PX BLOCK ITERATOR |          | 20000 |    97K|    18   (0)| 00:00:01 |  Q1,00 | PCWC |            |
|* 14 |               TABLE ACCESS FULL| T2       | 20000 |    97K|    18   (0)| 00:00:01 |  Q1,00 | PCWP |            |
|  15 |          SORT AGGREGATE        |          |     1 |     5 |            |          |        |      |            |
|  16 |           PX COORDINATOR       |          |       |       |            |          |        |      |            |
|  17 |            PX SEND QC (RANDOM) | :TQ20000 |     1 |     5 |            |          |  Q2,00 | P->S | QC (RAND)  |
|  18 |             SORT AGGREGATE     |          |     1 |     5 |            |          |  Q2,00 | PCWP |            |
|  19 |              PX BLOCK ITERATOR |          | 20000 |    97K|    27   (0)| 00:00:01 |  Q2,00 | PCWC |            |
|* 20 |               TABLE ACCESS FULL| T3       | 20000 |    97K|    27   (0)| 00:00:01 |  Q2,00 | PCWP |            |
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------
   8 - access(:Z>=:Z AND :Z<=:Z)
       filter(("T1"."N1">=1000 AND "WAIT_ROW"(.01,"T1"."N2")> AND "WAIT_ROW"(.01,"T1"."N3")>))
  14 - access(:Z>=:Z AND :Z<=:Z) 20 - access(:Z>=:Z AND :Z<=:Z)

The odd “:Z>=:Z AND :Z <=:Z” predicate is an artefact of rowid-range scans in parallel tablescans, and we’ve seen the “disappearing subquery” problem with predicates pulled from memory so that’s ignorable. The interesting point is that the “T1.N1 >= 1000” predicate will eliminate all the data from t1 very quickly – so why did it take roughly 3 minutes and 30 seconds to run the query ?

Quick Answer – Oracle ran the two subqueries before it started the t1 tablescan !

Slow Answer – I need to start by filling in a lot of background information.

Notice how we have multiple DFO Trees in this execution plan. In the TQ column these are captured as (Q1,xx) (Q2,xx) and (Q3,xx).  In previous blogs I’ve explained how you can follow the order of activity by following the table queues (effectively the “xx” – also known as virtual tables, also known as Data Flow Operations) in order, but I haven’t explained how you deal with multiple DFO trees. It would be nice to think that DFO Trees implicitly told you the order of operation – unfortunately that’s not true (at least in current versions of Oracle), and this query demonstrates the point.

Table Queues, DFOs (data flow operations), and DFO Trees

The first of Yasin Baskan’s two articles describes the terminology to use when describing the movement of data through a parallel execution plan, but for the sake of familiarity I’ll walk through the plan above using the appropriate terms.  (Note: once upon a time the term “DFO tree” didn’t exist and the term DFO was used to describe what is now called a DFO tree, and a number of articles I’ve written in the past echo this out-dated usage).

Lines 1 – 8 show a DFO tree consisting of two DFOs – the tree is labelled as Q3. The first DFO in the tree (DFO 0) is described in lines 5 – 8 where one set of parallel execution slaves scans real table t1 and sends a data set to the other set parallel execution slaves by writing into a virtual table (:TQ30000); the second DFO in the tree (DFO 1) is described in lines 1 – 4 where a set of parallel execution slaves reads from virtual table :TQ30000, does some work and sends a data set to the query co-ordinator by writing to virtual table :TQ30001.

Lines 9 – 14 show a second DFO tree consisting of a single DFO – this tree is labelled Q1;

Lines 15 – 20 show us a third DFO tree, labelled Q2, also consisting of a single DFO.

Essentially (as described by Yasin Baskan) the focal point of a single DFO (data flow operation) is a PX SEND, and the top of a DFO tree is a PX Coordinator.

The key to performance problems and interpreting tricky parallel execution plans is the fact that in the extreme case every DFO tree may operate at a different degree of parallelism, and all the DFO trees may be operating concurrently – an unlucky execution plan may acquire far more parallel execution slaves than you expect.

So what’s the order of execution in this query, how do we find out, how many parallel query slaves will we start (and stop) as the query runs, and what’s the maximum number of parallel query slaves that we will be holding concurrently ? There are lots of places you could look:

  • v$pq_tqstat might give you some idea of processes used and data moved – after you’ve run the query, but it’s a bit broken for multiple DFO trees.
  • v$px_sesstat will give you some information about the work done by currently live slave processes if you can query it while your query is still running (“set pause on” may help).
  • v$px_session joined to v$session_event will give you some information about the time lost to waits for currently live slave processes if you can query them while your query is still running (it would be nice if Oracle were to introduce a “v$px_sesevent”)
  • The SQL Monitor screen in OEM (or the dbms_sql_tune.report_sql_monitor() procedure is fantastic (but a little broken) if you’ve paid the licences for the diagnostic and performance packs.

Here’s part of the text output from a call to dbms_sql_tune.report_sql_monitor() for a slightly different query – one that doesn’t include any predicate at all on the t1 table:


SQL Plan Monitoring Details (Plan Hash Value=3828285674)
==================================================================================================================================================
| Id |            Operation             |   Name   |  Rows   | Cost |   Time    | Start  | Execs |   Rows   |  Mem  | Activity | Activity Detail |
|    |                                  |          | (Estim) |      | Active(s) | Active |       | (Actual) | (Max) |   (%)    |   (# samples)   |
==================================================================================================================================================
|  0 | SELECT STATEMENT                 |          |         |      |         1 |   +256 |    11 |     1000 |       |          |                 |
|  1 |   PX COORDINATOR                 |          |         |      |         1 |   +256 |    11 |     1000 |       |          |                 |
|  2 |    PX SEND QC (RANDOM)           | :TQ30001 |      49 |   60 |         1 |   +256 |     5 |     1000 |       |          |                 |
|  3 |     HASH UNIQUE                  |          |      49 |   60 |         1 |   +256 |     5 |     1000 |    7M |          |                 |
|  4 |      PX RECEIVE                  |          |      49 |   60 |         1 |   +256 |     5 |     4506 |       |          |                 |
|  5 |       PX SEND HASH               | :TQ30000 |      49 |   60 |         1 |   +256 |     5 |     4506 |       |          |                 |
|  6 |        HASH UNIQUE               |          |      49 |   60 |        68 |   +189 |     5 |     4506 |    7M |          |                 |
|  7 |         PX BLOCK ITERATOR        |          |      50 |   14 |        68 |   +189 |     5 |    10000 |       |          |                 |
|  8 |          TABLE ACCESS FULL       | T1       |      50 |   14 |        68 |   +189 |    63 |    10000 |       |          |                 |
|  9 |           SORT AGGREGATE         |          |       1 |      |         1 |   +187 |     1 |        1 |       |          |                 |
| 10 |            PX COORDINATOR        |          |         |      |         1 |   +187 |     4 |        3 |       |          |                 |
| 11 |             PX SEND QC (RANDOM)  | :TQ10000 |       1 |      |         3 |   +185 |     3 |        3 |       |          |                 |
| 12 |              SORT AGGREGATE      |          |       1 |      |        74 |   +114 |     3 |        3 |       |          |                 |
| 13 |               PX BLOCK ITERATOR  |          |   20000 |   18 |        74 |   +114 |     3 |    20000 |       |          |                 |
| 14 |                TABLE ACCESS FULL | T2       |   20000 |   18 |        74 |   +114 |    37 |    20000 |       |          |                 |
| 15 |           SORT AGGREGATE         |          |       1 |      |         1 |   +118 |     1 |        1 |       |          |                 |
| 16 |            PX COORDINATOR        |          |         |      |         1 |   +118 |     3 |        2 |       |          |                 |
| 17 |             PX SEND QC (RANDOM)  | :TQ20000 |       1 |      |         2 |   +111 |     2 |        2 |       |          |                 |
| 18 |              SORT AGGREGATE      |          |       1 |      |       111 |     +2 |     2 |        2 |       |          |                 |
| 19 |               PX BLOCK ITERATOR  |          |   20000 |   27 |       111 |     +2 |     2 |    20000 |       |          |                 |
| 20 |                TABLE ACCESS FULL | T3       |   20000 |   27 |       111 |     +2 |    26 |    20000 |       |          |                 |
==================================================================================================================================================

There’s a little inaccuracy in timings – in the order of the odd second or two – probably because of the granularity used, but the columns “Start Active” and “Time Active (s)” are, nevertheless, very revealing. The first one tells you when a line in the plan first did some work, the second one tells you how long that line has been active. As I walk through the plan remember that the timing granularity is fairly crude, so the numbers don’t quite add up as nicely as we might like.

If you check lines 17 – 20 you can see that DFO tree 2 (:TQ2xxxx) was the first thing to go active with its PX slaves starting at time t = 2 seconds and running for 111 seconds to do that scan and initial aggregation; the PX send line started at time t = 111 seconds and ran for 2 seconds to pass the data from the slaves to the coordinator.

There’s a little glitch (or hand waving moment) around lines15 and 16 where the PX Coordinator receives and aggregates data from the PX slaves – the co-ordinator seems to start doing this several seconds later than it should.

In lines 11 – 14 you can see that DFO tree 1 (:TQ1xxxx) was the second thing to go active with its PX slaves starting at time t = 114 (i.e. just after DFO tree 2 completes);  the full scan and initial aggregate ran for 74 seconds (taking us to time t = 188). The PX send started (a little early, this time) at t = 185 and ran for 3 seconds, with the co-ordinator starting at t = 187 and taking one second to receive and do the final aggregation.

In lines 2 – 8 we can see DFO tree 3 (:TQ3xxxx) starting up, but this DFO tree includes two DFOs. One set of slaves scans table t1 applying the predicates to filter the data then does the initial hash distinct before hash distributing the intermediate result to the next set of slaves that finish off the distinct aggregation.

When DFO :TQ30000 starts at t = 189, the previous DFO trees have completed and the PX coordinator has the results of the two subqueries which it passes to the slave set which can now scan and check for: “n1 >= 500 and  n2 > {derived constant} and n3 > {derived constant}”. The scan and initial aggregation takes 68 seconds completing at t = 255, and at t = 256 the results are distributed to the second set of PX slaves. The second set of slaves has virtually nothing to do and reports only 1 second of execution time before passing the data (DFO :TQ30001) to the query coordinator which does the final aggregation and report.

A key point to note is that this timing information tells us that (a) the subqueries both completed before the tablescan of t1 started, and – perhaps more importantly – that we cannot rely on the TQXnnnn numbers to tell us the order of operation of the DFO trees. In this example DFO tree 2 ran first, DFO tree 1 ran second, and DFO tree 3 ran third – some queries might happen to show the names and the order in synch, that would be a coincidence, not a deliberate design feature.

A little reminder, though – even though we cannot rely on the DFO tree names to tell us the ordering in which the DFO trees operate, when we look at the data flow operations inside the trees (i.e. the last few digits of a TQ name) the order of operation withing a given tree matches the sequence indicated by the TQ name.

Counting Slaves.

There’s more in the Monitor report that can help us understand the workload – and in this case I’ve got a lucky coincidence to help, and a little surprise to go with it.  For parallel queries the report includes a summary of parallel execution activity, and this is what I got from my example:

Parallel Execution Details (DOP=5 , Servers Allocated=15)
===========================================================================================================================
|      Name      | Type  | Group# | Server# | Elapsed |   Cpu   | Concurrency | PL/SQL  |  Other   | Buffer | Wait Events |
|                |       |        |         | Time(s) | Time(s) |  Waits(s)   | Time(s) | Waits(s) |  Gets  | (sample #)  |
===========================================================================================================================
| PX Coordinator | QC    |        |         |    0.03 |    0.02 |             |         |     0.02 |     15 |             |
| p00a           | Set 1 |      1 |       1 |    0.27 |    0.27 |             |    0.10 |          |    163 |             |
| p00b           | Set 1 |      1 |       2 |    0.25 |    0.25 |             |    0.09 |          |    156 |             |
| p00c           | Set 1 |      1 |       3 |    0.26 |    0.26 |             |    0.09 |          |    156 |             |

| p00a           | Set 1 |      2 |       1 |    0.43 |    0.43 |             |    0.15 |          |    221 |             |
| p00b           | Set 1 |      2 |       2 |    0.44 |    0.44 |             |    0.15 |          |    221 |             |

| p000           | Set 1 |      3 |       1 |    0.00 |    0.00 |             |         |          |        |             |
| p001           | Set 1 |      3 |       2 |    0.00 |    0.00 |             |         |          |        |             |
| p002           | Set 1 |      3 |       3 |    0.01 |    0.01 |             |         |          |        |             |
| p003           | Set 1 |      3 |       4 |    0.01 |    0.01 |             |         |          |        |             |
| p004           | Set 1 |      3 |       5 |    0.01 |    0.01 |             |         |          |        |             |
| p005           | Set 2 |      3 |       1 |    0.26 |    0.26 |             |    0.09 |          |    113 |             |
| p006           | Set 2 |      3 |       2 |    0.24 |    0.24 |        0.00 |    0.08 |          |    108 |             |
| p007           | Set 2 |      3 |       3 |    0.25 |    0.25 |             |    0.09 |          |    117 |             |
| p008           | Set 2 |      3 |       4 |    0.25 |    0.25 |             |    0.09 |          |    108 |             |
| p009           | Set 2 |      3 |       5 |    0.25 |    0.25 |        0.00 |    0.09 |          |    117 |             |
===========================================================================================================================

I’ve inserted two blank lines breaking the summary down into three separate groups, which you can identify by the heading “Group#”. In this table we see Group 1 has one slave set of three slaves – which corresponds to the tablescan of t2; Group 2 consists of one slave set of two slaves – which corresponds to the tablescan of t3; and Group 1 has two slave sets of 5 slaves each – which correspond to the tablescan and aggregation of t1. The Group numbers appear to align correctly with the DFO tree numbers.

Another detail that stands out from this list is that slaves p00a and p00b are used in the tablescan of t3, and in the tablescan of t2 (where they are joined by slave p00c). In this example Oracle has reused the slaves from one subquery to run the next. However we can also see that the slaves p000p009 that are used for the tablescan of t1 don’t have names that overlap with the slaves used to scan t2 and t3 – which tells use that we have some (in this case two) DFO trees running concurrently.

Another key point in this article is that not only does a DOP of N mean we could run 2*N slaves concurrently in a parallel query, if we have a query that breaks into a plan that uses multiple DFO trees we might 2 * N * {number of DFO trees) allocated and running concurrently. (And, as we see here, it’s even possible that different DFO trees run with different DOPs, leaving Oracle very confused about what to report as the DOP of the query – dbms_xplan actually reported this one as DOP = 4 !)

A final implementation detail that is not necessarily obvious from this table, but which I can infer because I know the history of what was going on: although, as described above, the tablescan of t3 was the first activity that generated a row source, Oracle started up the 10 slaves for the parallel tablescan and aggregate of t1 before it started the two slaves it needed to scan t3. I can infer this because there were no slave processes active when I started running the query, so it is reasonable to assume that the slave names tell me something about the order in which they were allocated. In general you would not be able to notice this in a busy system where slaves were pre-allocated (parallel_min_servers != 0) and constantly being acquired and released. (I was also able to corroborate some of the details above by looking at v$px_stat and v$session_event for the relevant slave processes shortly after the query started.)

Summary

There are a number of key points this example shows us about complex parallel queries:

  • A single query can produce multiple “DFO trees”
  • Each tree can run at a different degree of parallelism
  • The “tree number” (the X in TQXnnnn) may not reveal the order in which the trees are operated
  • The order of operation of the DFOs within a tree is revealed by the nnnn in TQXnnnn
  • It is not easy to see in a basic execution plan which DFO tree might be executing concurrently and which consecutively
  • PX server processes may be acquired by the query co-ordinator a long time before they actually become active

Footnote:

If you happen to have looked closely at the time information in the Parallel Execution Details you’ll note that the times are total rubbish when compared to the monitoring times. It looks as if the time spent in dbms_lock.sleep() has been ignored (perhaps as an “idle” wait).

 

5 Comments »

  1. Hello Jonathan!
    Thank you for the article, it was really useful for me.
    There is one interesting thing I found with the serial version of your query. Filter operation disappearing from the execution plan when we use query as is (due to subquery pushing, as you mentioned), but if we add /*+ no_push_subq*/ hint to both (or one) of filter subqueries, then the FILTER is back on its place:

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    | Id  | Operation            | Name | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    |   0 | SELECT STATEMENT     |      |   500 |  7000 |   317   (1)| 00:00:01 |
    |   1 |  HASH UNIQUE         |      |   500 |  7000 |   317   (1)| 00:00:01 |
    |*  2 |   FILTER             |      |       |       |            |          |
    |*  3 |    TABLE ACCESS FULL | T1   | 10000 |   136K|   107   (0)| 00:00:01 |
    |   4 |    SORT AGGREGATE    |      |     1 |     5 |            |          |
    |   5 |     TABLE ACCESS FULL| T2   | 20000 |    97K|   104   (0)| 00:00:01 |
    |   6 |    SORT AGGREGATE    |      |     1 |     5 |            |          |
    |   7 |     TABLE ACCESS FULL| T3   | 20000 |    97K|   104   (0)| 00:00:01 |
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    

    I don’t believe this hint can affect actual execution path somehow (in the current case of course) – it is still FS of T1 with subquery execution once first filter (t1.n1 >= 500) returns true, this also confirmed by execution statistics of both version of queries:

    Statistics
    ---------------------------------------------------
          0  recursive calls
          0  db block gets
       1114  consistent gets
          0  physical reads
          0  redo size
       9535  bytes sent via SQL*Net to client
        914  bytes received via SQL*Net from client
         35  SQL*Net roundtrips to/from client
          0  sorts (memory)
          0  sorts (disk)
        500  rows processed
    

    Similar numbers for both hinted and non-hinted versions.

    But I wondered about new cardinality value, its estimation is so precise, the query returns exactly 500 rows. But looks like it turns to be just a fortunate coincidence, since in 10053 tracefile I see following lines for T1:

    Card: Original: 20000.000000 Rounded: Computed 10010: 10009.989990 Non Adjusted: 10009.989990
    >> Single Tab Card adjusted from 10009.989990 to 10000.000000 due to adaptive dynamic sampling
    ....
    Grouping column cardinality [ N1] 500
    

    Computed value is calculated like ((high filter)/(high-low)+1/num_distinct)*card(t1) = ((999-500)/(999-0)+1/1000)*20000 = 10009,98998998999. And oracle decided to correct it to 10000, thanks to dynamic sampling; though with /*+ dynamic_sampling(t1,0)*/ hint it leaves 10010 as filtered cardinality for T1.
    But still final cardinality looks like ~0.5*num_distinct(N1) – it ignores the impact of two filtering subqueries, though in non-hinted version, I believe, filtered cardinality counted like 10009.989990*0.05*0.05 = 25,024974975 (5% for an open-range predicate), what is again confirmed by trace information:

    Table: T1 Alias: T1
    Card: Original: 20000.000000 Rounded: 25 Computed: 25.024975 Non Adjusted: 25.024975
    .....
    Grouping column cardinality [ N1] 24
    

    Actually, I don’t know how it calculated grouping cardinality in this case.

    Oops, I started to write this comment yesterday and looks like I forget what I was trying to say :).

    Anyway, I’m a bit surprised by differences database shows for this two plans. I can’t completely understand, why it invokes adaptive dynamic sampling when we use +no_push_subq – the query was executed after flushing the shared pool and oracle had no chance to compare actual and estimated values.

    I would be very grateful if you can spill some light on this – are those plans really identical for the runtime? And if so, why optimizer’s cardinality estimations are so different?

    Thank you.

    Comment by Viacheslav Andzhich — December 26, 2015 @ 2:42 pm GMT Dec 26,2015 | Reply

  2. Viacheslav,

    There are all sorts of interesting changes, inconsistencies and anomalies with subquery handling.
    I think you’ve hit three broad topics in one comment.

    First – The difference in (potential) run-time behaviour with pushing and not pushing. (My assumption is … ) if you have a filter operation (i.e. not pushing) then the tablescan subroutine has to get rows from the table and return them to the filter subroutine, so there’s a lot of data passing through a call stack between subroutine; if you push then the tablescan routine calls the subquery routine so the data returned from the tablescan to its parent is much smaller. In simple cases this could reduce the CPU usage.

    First – (part 2) – (again my assumption) if you don’t push then exadata/inmemory have to do their tablescans and return data to the front end and then have the filter applied; if you push then (like the parallel option) the subquery can be executed early to become a value that can be pushed to the cell server / applied during in-memory scan.

    Second – Basic Cardinality – “greater than subquery” seems, with one exception, to turn into 5% cardinality. This should be applied for each subquery in turn, but sometimes some of the 5% get lost; the point at which the 5% effect appears depends on whether the subquery is pushed or not; and the costing, in recent versions of Oracle, should be included in the cost of the higher level but sometimes it isn’t (or is for some of the subqueries).

    Third – distinct cardinality – varies with version of Oracle, but may include (for multi-column distinct) factors of 1/sqrt(2), and generally includes the “selection without replacement” algorithm described by Alberto Dell’Era: http://www.adellera.it/investigations/index.html

    Comment by Jonathan Lewis — December 29, 2015 @ 1:53 pm GMT Dec 29,2015 | Reply

  3. Thank you Jonathan!
    It now seems much more clear.
    I extended the tables in the expample from 2e4 to 2e6 rows to check CPU consumption and found that when we push (non-hinted version), Oracle spents 2.04 sec on CPU on average, while hinted version requires 2.17 sec. Also, I believe, your assumption can be confirmed by column projection information for FS of T1 – for pushed subq it looks like “T1”.”N1″[NUMBER,22], while for hinted query it references all three columns: “T1”.”N1″[NUMBER,22], “T1”.”N2″[NUMBER,22], “T1”.”N3″[NUMBER,22].Looks like it has to fetch all the rows from T1 into intermediate dataset to pass them to filter operation subsequently. Now it’s clear for me that those plans have significant differences.
    Also, thank you for your tips on cardinality estimation and link to Alberto’s works – I’ve read his whitepaper on SWR but never tested it in real world, and so forget most of his conclusions; need to read it again, obviously :)

    Comment by Viacheslav Andzhich — January 5, 2016 @ 11:38 am GMT Jan 5,2016 | Reply

  4. […] used a query with a couple of “constant” subqueries as a focal point for a blog note on reading parallel execution plans. One of the comments on that note raised a question about cardinality estimates and, […]

    Pingback by Subquery Effects | Oracle Scratchpad — January 11, 2016 @ 12:51 pm GMT Jan 11,2016 | Reply

  5. Better late then never. By the time you have published this article, I printed it out and read it carefully in my daily 1 hour way to work. When done with this reading I wanted to say only one thing : THANK YOU.

    Best regards
    Mohamed Houri

    Comment by hourim — June 19, 2016 @ 6:23 pm GMT Jun 19,2016 | Reply


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