Oracle Scratchpad

September 13, 2019

Nologging

Filed under: Infrastructure,Oracle,redo — Jonathan Lewis @ 12:18 pm BST Sep 13,2019

Bobby Durrett recently published a note about estimating the volume of non-logged blocks written by an instance with the aim of getting some idea of the extra redo that would be generated if a database were switched to “force logging”.

Since my most recent blog notes have included various extracts and summaries from the symbolic dumps of redo logs it occurred to me that another strategy for generating the same information would be to dump the redo generated by Oracle when it wanted to log some information about non-logged blocks. This may sound like a contradiction, of course, but it’s the difference between data and meta-data: if Oracle wants to write data blocks to disc without logging their contents it needs to write a note into the redo log saying “there is no log of the contents of these blocks”.

In terms of redo op codes this is done through “layer 19”, the set of op codes relating to direct path loads, with op code 19.2 being the specific “invalidate range” one that we are (probably)interested in.

So here’s a little demo of extracting the information we need:

rem
rem     Script:         nologging_writes.sql
rem     Author:         Jonathan Lewis
rem     Dated:          Sep 2019
rem
rem     Last tested 
rem             12.2.0.1
rem

column c_scn new_value m_scn_1
select to_char(current_scn,'999999999999999999999999') c_scn from v$database;

create table t1 nologging
as
select  * 
from    all_objects
where   rownum <= 10000
/

column c_scn new_value m_scn_2
select to_char(current_scn,'999999999999999999999999') c_scn from v$database;

alter session set tracefile_identifier = 'TABLE';
alter system dump redo scn min &m_scn_1 scn max &m_scn_2 layer 19;


create index t1_i1
on t1(object_name, owner, object_id)
pctfree 80
nologging
/

column c_scn new_value m_scn_3
select to_char(current_scn,'999999999999999999999999') c_scn from v$database;

alter session set tracefile_identifier = 'INDEX';
alter system dump redo scn min &m_scn_2 scn max &m_scn_3 layer 19;


insert /*+ append */ into t1
select * from t1
/

column c_scn new_value m_scn_4
select to_char(current_scn,'999999999999999999999999') c_scn from v$database;

alter session set tracefile_identifier = 'APPEND';
alter system dump redo scn min &m_scn_3 scn max &m_scn_4 layer 19;


I’ve executed a “create table nologging”, a “create index nologging”, then an “insert /*+ append */” into the nologging table. I’ve captured the current SCN before and after each call, added an individual identifier to the tracefile name for each call, then dumped the redo between each pair of SCNs, restricting the dump to layer 19. (I could have been more restrictive and said “layer 19 opcode 2”, but there is an opcode 19.4 which might also be relevant – though I don’t know when it might appear.)

Here’s the list of trace files I generated, plus a couple extra that appeared around the same time:

 ls -ltr *.trc | tail -6
-rw-r----- 1 oracle oinstall 361355 Sep 12 19:44 orcl12c_ora_23630.trc
-rw-r----- 1 oracle oinstall   5208 Sep 12 19:44 orcl12c_ora_23630_TABLE.trc
-rw-r----- 1 oracle oinstall  27434 Sep 12 19:44 orcl12c_ora_23630_INDEX.trc
-rw-r----- 1 oracle oinstall   2528 Sep 12 19:44 orcl12c_ora_23630_APPEND.trc
-rw-r----- 1 oracle oinstall 162633 Sep 12 19:45 orcl12c_mmon_3042.trc
-rw-r----- 1 oracle oinstall 162478 Sep 12 19:45 orcl12c_gen0_2989.trc


And having identified the trace files we can now extract the block invalidation records (I’ve inserted blank lines to separate the results from the three separate files):

grep OP orcl12c_ora_23630_*.trc

orcl12c_ora_23630_APPEND.trc:CHANGE #1 INVLD CON_ID:3 AFN:22 DBA:0x058001bd BLKS:0x0043 OBJ:125947 SCN:0x00000b860da6e1a5 SEQ:1 OP:19.2 ENC:0 FLG:0x0000
orcl12c_ora_23630_APPEND.trc:CHANGE #1 INVLD CON_ID:3 AFN:22 DBA:0x05800482 BLKS:0x006e OBJ:125947 SCN:0x00000b860da6e1a5 SEQ:1 OP:19.2 ENC:0 FLG:0x0000

orcl12c_ora_23630_INDEX.trc:CHANGE #1 INVLD CON_ID:3 AFN:22 DBA:0x058000c4 BLKS:0x0004 OBJ:125948 SCN:0x00000b860da6e162 SEQ:1 OP:19.2 ENC:0 FLG:0x0000
orcl12c_ora_23630_INDEX.trc:CHANGE #1 INVLD CON_ID:3 AFN:22 DBA:0x058000c8 BLKS:0x0004 OBJ:125948 SCN:0x00000b860da6e162 SEQ:1 OP:19.2 ENC:0 FLG:0x0000
...
...     70 lines deleted
...
orcl12c_ora_23630_INDEX.trc:CHANGE #1 INVLD CON_ID:3 AFN:22 DBA:0x05800424 BLKS:0x0004 OBJ:125948 SCN:0x00000b860da6e181 SEQ:1 OP:19.2 ENC:0 FLG:0x0000
orcl12c_ora_23630_INDEX.trc:CHANGE #1 INVLD CON_ID:3 AFN:22 DBA:0x05800428 BLKS:0x0004 OBJ:125948 SCN:0x00000b860da6e181 SEQ:1 OP:19.2 ENC:0 FLG:0x0000
orcl12c_ora_23630_INDEX.trc:CHANGE #1 MEDIA RECOVERY MARKER CON_ID:3 SCN:0x0000000000000000 SEQ:0 OP:18.3 ENC:0 FLG:0x0000

orcl12c_ora_23630_TABLE.trc:CHANGE #1 INVLD CON_ID:3 AFN:22 DBA:0x05800103 BLKS:0x000d OBJ:125947 SCN:0x00000b860da6e13e SEQ:1 OP:19.2 ENC:0 FLG:0x0000
orcl12c_ora_23630_TABLE.trc:CHANGE #1 INVLD CON_ID:3 AFN:22 DBA:0x05800111 BLKS:0x000f OBJ:125947 SCN:0x00000b860da6e140 SEQ:1 OP:19.2 ENC:0 FLG:0x0000
orcl12c_ora_23630_TABLE.trc:CHANGE #1 INVLD CON_ID:3 AFN:22 DBA:0x05800121 BLKS:0x0007 OBJ:125947 SCN:0x00000b860da6e141 SEQ:1 OP:19.2 ENC:0 FLG:0x0000
orcl12c_ora_23630_TABLE.trc:CHANGE #1 INVLD CON_ID:3 AFN:22 DBA:0x05800268 BLKS:0x0008 OBJ:125947 SCN:0x00000b860da6e142 SEQ:1 OP:19.2 ENC:0 FLG:0x0000
orcl12c_ora_23630_TABLE.trc:CHANGE #1 INVLD CON_ID:3 AFN:22 DBA:0x05800271 BLKS:0x000f OBJ:125947 SCN:0x00000b860da6e144 SEQ:1 OP:19.2 ENC:0 FLG:0x0000
orcl12c_ora_23630_TABLE.trc:CHANGE #1 INVLD CON_ID:3 AFN:22 DBA:0x05800081 BLKS:0x000f OBJ:125947 SCN:0x00000b860da6e146 SEQ:1 OP:19.2 ENC:0 FLG:0x0000
orcl12c_ora_23630_TABLE.trc:CHANGE #1 INVLD CON_ID:3 AFN:22 DBA:0x05800091 BLKS:0x000f OBJ:125947 SCN:0x00000b860da6e148 SEQ:1 OP:19.2 ENC:0 FLG:0x0000
orcl12c_ora_23630_TABLE.trc:CHANGE #1 INVLD CON_ID:3 AFN:22 DBA:0x058000a1 BLKS:0x000f OBJ:125947 SCN:0x00000b860da6e14a SEQ:1 OP:19.2 ENC:0 FLG:0x0000
orcl12c_ora_23630_TABLE.trc:CHANGE #1 INVLD CON_ID:3 AFN:22 DBA:0x058000b1 BLKS:0x000f OBJ:125947 SCN:0x00000b860da6e14c SEQ:1 OP:19.2 ENC:0 FLG:0x0000
orcl12c_ora_23630_TABLE.trc:CHANGE #1 INVLD CON_ID:3 AFN:22 DBA:0x05800182 BLKS:0x003b OBJ:125947 SCN:0x00000b860da6e14c SEQ:1 OP:19.2 ENC:0 FLG:0x0000

Each line records the number of blocks (BLKS:) allocated and, as you can see, the APPEND trace shows much larger allocations than the TABLE trace (except for the last one) because the tablespace is locally managed with system allocated extents, and the first few invalidation records for the table creation are in the initial 8 block (64KB) extents; by the time we get to the last few blocks of the initial table creation we’ve just allocated the first 128 block (1MB) extent, which is why the last invalidation record for the table can cover so many more blocks than than the first few.

It is interesting to note, though, that the invalidation record for the INDEX trace are all small, typically 4 blocks, sometimes 3, even when we’ve obviously got to a point where we’re allocating from extents of 128 blocks.

I believe that somewhere I have a note explaining that the invalidation records always identified batches of 5 blocks in older versions of Oracle – but that may simply have been a consequence of the way that freelist management used to work (allocating 5 blocks at a time from the segment to the master freelist).

Although we could simply list all the invalidation records and sum the block counts manually we could be a little smarter with our code, summing them with awk, for example.

grep -n "OP:19.2" orcl12c_ora_23630_TABLE.trc |
     sed 's/.*BLKS://' |
     sed 's/ .*$//'  |
     awk '{m = m + strtonum($0) ; printf("%8i %8i \n",strtonum($0),m)}'
 
      13       13 
      15       28 
       7       35 
       8       43 
      15       58 
      15       73 
      15       88 
      15      103 
      15      118 
      59      177 

It’s left as an exercise to the Unix enthusiast to work out how to take the base tracefile name extract all the sets of data, cater for the odd 18.3 records (whose presence I didn’t request), report any lines for 19.x rows other than 19.2 and sum BLKS separately by TABLE, INDEX, and APPEND.

Once you’ve summed the number of blocks across all the invalidation records (and assuming you’re using the standard 8KB block size) the increease in the volume of redo generated if you alter the database to force logging will be (8KB + a little bit) * number of blocks.  The “little bit” will be close to 44 bytes.

If you’ve set your database up to use multiple block sizes you’ll have to aggregate the invalidation recrords by the AFN (absolute file number) entry and check which files use which block size and multiply up accordingly. And if you’re using a pluggable database (as I was) inside a container database you might also want to filter the redo dump by CON_ID.

If you do set the database to force logging and repeat the search for layer 19 in the redo  you’ll find that each individual data block written using a direct path write generates its own redo record, which will have length “data block size + 44” bytes and hold a single change vector of type 19.1 (Direct Loader block redo entry).

Footnote

It’s worth mentioning, that the dump of redo will go back into the archived redo logs in order to cover the entire range requested by the SCN man/max valeus; so it would be perfectly feasible (though possibly a little time and I/O consuming) to run the report across a full 24 hour window.

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